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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I haul a motor cycle on a trailer fairly often and I always worry that I will screw something up. On of the things I worry about is unloading the bike. I will not even handle a bike that has no front brake, without the front brake I feel like I do not have control of the bike. Being a dummy, I washed a bike while it was on the trailer and then delivered it to the owner. The tires were wet, the trailer was wet so guess how the unloading went. Not a total wreck but scary for sure. I did not think of it until much later but I could have put the bike in gear, manipulated the clutch and had a rear brake also. Am I the first one to use engine braking to control a bike coming off a trailer?? Maybe I am just a little slow to pick up on such easy tricks. If you haul a bike and tie it down with ratchet straps, do not put the side stand or center stand down. You can bend the frame and possibly do other damage to the bike. Comments any one???
 
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When I've hauled a bike, either in a truck or on a trailer, I've never believed in using the side stand or the centerstand. I've always tied the bike down to the corners of either the bed or the trailer from the handlebars for the best leverage. Depending on how far I've taken the bike, I've often not even bothered to tie the rear of it, particularly if it's in a truck bed with the gate closed. As for unloading, you can definitely use the clutch with it in gear, but the front brake is the safest way to keep it under control. And yeah, wet surfaces definitely add to the risk factor
 

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Used to tow a moto-x bike in a little trailer. No stands - but there were close fitting rails either side of each of the wheels. SOP was to tie straps between the handlebars and attachment points on the bed of the trailer, and then firmly tighten each side to compress the forks to about 3/4 their travel. That allowed the fork springs to keep the tension on the straps, with a little travel remaining to absorb bumps if needed. Couple of loops of bungee cord around the front brake lever to lock the front wheel, and that was about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I really posted this because there are some new members on the forum. Most of us know how to trailer a bike but some may not know.
I saw a Harley being hauled and it had at least 300 feet of orange straps on it.
I have a Harbor Freight wheel clamp/socket/pocket or what you want to call it and it really works.
 
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When there's access to a truck, the above of securing the front and compressing the forks is what I've done. Half the time securing the rear, half not. No side/center stand.
As for the scoot, this will totally be my new method of bringing home bikes, assuming I can find another person to assist... it's a 2 person job. Just secure webbing to the back of the scoot, then run it to the bars of the bike being trailered and go!


Doode hauled one with a scooter, still wondering about that one.
 

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When there's access to a truck, the above of securing the front and compressing the forks is what I've done. Half the time securing the rear, half not. No side/center stand.
As for the scoot, this will totally be my new method of bringing home bikes, assuming I can find another person to assist... it's a 2 person job. Just secure webbing to the back of the scoot, then run it to the bars of the bike being trailered and go!
Two people! That's cheating!:)
 

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Doode hauled one with a scooter, still wondering about that one.
When there's access to a truck, the above of securing the front and compressing the forks is what I've done. Half the time securing the rear, half not. No side/center stand.
As for the scoot, this will totally be my new method of bringing home bikes, assuming I can find another person to assist... it's a 2 person job. Just secure webbing to the back of the scoot, then run it to the bars of the bike being trailered and go!
Two people! That's cheating!:)
I knew it!! :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Are you saying that you towed the bike with the scooter???
We towed a bike home with a piece of rope from bike to bike because one was out of gas.
That did not work really well but we got home with it. Yes, with 2 people.
 

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I did it once and I'd never do it again. Granted, it was a long tow, about 20 miles (I was young, nuts, no truck and broke, couldn't afford to do it any other way), but the number of times I had to let go of the rope or get yanked down sideways was more than I'd ever risk again. And it was my first CBX, so well over 600 lbs... wasn't anything graceful about it
 

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It sure beats taking it apart and loading it in the back of an suv, which is what I usually do.
Especially when I forget an important tool, or my stand, or the bike has been sitting outside for years and everything is corroded and I can't get the the front or rear wheel off... I end up removing the swing arm and steerer, and I forgot my stand!



Two people! That's cheating!:)
 

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I go to Uhaul and rent the motorcycle trailer for $25 a day. They are low and have a full width ramp. It takes two people to load my Goldwing. When I brought my 450 home we used the back of my kid's Toyota 4x4. I will never do that again.
 
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