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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a '71 CL450 K4 Scrambler. A recent barn find rebuild. I love this thing. But the gas tank equalizer line confuses me. It runs under the frame from either side of the tank, so before I can pull the tank off, I have to remove the line, otherwise the line effectively ties the tank to the frame.

Problem is, there's no way to turn off the gas where the line connects to either side of the tank, so I have to either completely empty the gas out of the tank before removing it, which gets old after awhile, or do a quick juggling act of trying not to spill too much gas all over the place as I try to pull the lines and quickly plug the tank outlets. A lot of gas comes out in a very short amount of time (my wife says the same of me).

Design flaw? Or a breakdown in my limited problem solving skills? I'm not fond of draining the tank every time I want to remove it, so I've devised a way to minimize the spillage, but still I'm not satisfied with my solution. Here's how I'm currently doing it:

1. Petcock turned off.
2. Place rags strategically everywhere, a pan and cardboard on the floor.
3. With the equalizer line still in place, clamp shut both ends of the equalizer line as closely as possible to where they connect to the tank.
4. Quickly slip off one end of the equalizer hose from the tank and shove a homemade plug over the tank outlet before too much gas shoots out, although too much gas seems to always shoot out anyway.
5. The clamp, or at least the clamp I use, is too large to slide through the area where the equalizer line threads through the frame, so I release the clamp on the end that I just disconnected from the tank, and catch the fuel that drains from the equalizer line.
6. Leaving one end of the equalizer hose still connected to the tank, I lift the tank off while carefully dragging the loose end of the hose through the frame. Voila.

Not the most difficult job, I know. But messy and a lot of messing around just to remove a tank. I can't believe this thing is designed like this. What am I missing? Or am I just not comprehending a simpler solution?

Thanks for any insights.
 

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Siphon pump, then connect a length of fuel line to one of the petcock outputs and turn it to reserve, collect the gas in a small fuel can. Tilt the bike to the right to get any from the left side to the right, until no more drains. Then you should be able to put the bike back on the side stand and disconnect the right side of the crossover and lift the tank off.
 

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Put on a long enough piece of hose to go over the top of the frame. The gas will siphon over to the other side as needed and you don't need to undo it to raise the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
There goes... my newbies are showing again. Never even heard of a siphon pump for such an application. Thanks for the tip! And thanks for the more detailed description, WintrSol. I look forward to trying this approach. And thank you, Mike in Idaho, but my tank/frame/seat configuration doesn't make the over the frame setup practical. Good idea, though. Thanks for trying.
 

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I just use about a foot of fuel line. I pull the hose off the petcock and put the spare line on it. Stick the spare line in a 5 gal gas can, turn the reserve and go do something else for 5 min. My crossover is a little long so I lift the back of the tank before breaking it free. That way it doesn't need to be all the way dry. I have seen cutoff valves for the crossovers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Whaaat? Fuel Line Quick Disconnect Couplings? I never knew such magical things exist! Just the idea I've been hoping for. Thank you! And the extra little length of crossover line is a great idea. I'll be giving that a try, too. I dirt scramble more than road ramble on my CL450, and I've been dreading the day when I'll need to take the tank off in the hills. Now I'm feeling a whole lot better about things. Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Whaaat? Fuel Line Quick Disconnect Couplings? I never knew such magical things exist! Just the idea I've been hoping for. Thank you! And the extra little length of crossover line is a great idea. I'll be giving that a try, too. I dirt scramble more than road ramble on my CL450, and I've been dreading the day when I'll need to take the tank off in the hills. Now I'm feeling a whole lot better about things. Thank you.
 

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If you get the couplings, install them to one side or the other so you can reach them when connecting and disconnecting. I didn't :oops:
 

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OK these bikes are NOT all that heavy, we're not talking Harleys.

Drain it down with the petcock as far as it will go.
GENTLY - Lay it over on it's side pop off the crossover tube and put a plug cap on both sides.
Pick up the bike and take off the tank.
 

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If you get the couplings, install them to one side or the other so you can reach them when connecting and disconnecting. I didn't :oops:
And it gets crowded in there for large hands, so study it a while before choosing the spot. I installed quick disconnects without the internal fuel valves, just so I didn't damage the lines pulling one end free. But the self-sealing ones are good, too.
 

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First, weld a thimble onto a coat hanger. Then carefully use it as a dipper to get out as much gas as possible, transferring it to a suitable receptacle. Rent a small crane, and attach a hook to the rear wheel. Slowly lift the bike off of the ground so that any remaining gas flows to the front of the tank. Then disconnect the crossover. Once you've done what needs to be done, go through the steps in reverse order. Or get a quick disconnect fitting.

Sorry, procrastinating at work and feeling sarcastic!
 

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re sarcastic, be sure to notify your local union rep first.
:D
 

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Make sure you get the double disconnects. Some only stop the flow of fuel from one side. You need one that stops both sides. Less than $12 on eBay.
 

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I got the motion pro ones that I think are about $35. They lasted several years. Finally broke in very cold weather while disconnecting to put bike away for winter. The orings that came with it were junk and were replaced with army spec ones from McMaster Carr. It broke at the logical thin spot and I may try to gut it and make one from brass. I always used a needle nose to disconnect it because it's pretty obstructed no matter where it's at. I don't think I'll get another. A little foresight and patience and I'll be fine.
 
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