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Discussion Starter #1
To remove a Frozen Broken Exhaust Stud on an old motorcycle can be challenging to say the least. I'll show you the hack I use to get this one out of a 1972 Honda CL350 twin without taking the engine out of the bike. It's a tough one, cause it's really stuck.
 

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Love the names you give your bikes, We do that too, but always a nickname cause of something that happens to it, with it, or something unique about the bike, or an old girlfriend.
 

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Love the names you give your bikes, We do that too, but always a nickname cause of something that happens to it, with it, or something unique about the bike, or an old girlfriend.
Thanks! Sounds like how my cars get their names. My favorite was the Red Baron, which was my old beat-up Camaro that was always a challenge to keep running. Luckily, we were always able to get the Red Baron to fly again!!
 

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Nice work & good trick.
A couple of things you can add to it:

1st: Try using Left Hand Drill bits when drilling out the hole.
Sometimes you get lucky and the broken stud will back out while drilling.

2nd: After heating the stud apply some parafin or candle wax to it.
It will wick into the threads better than oil does.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Heating the stud was to soften it a bit because, it was work hardened when it was broken off. It made it soft enough so I could force the torx bit into the hole and not wreck the bit. Yes it expanded when I heated it, but as it cooled it shrank. Then when I heated the aluminum, the threaded hole got bigger and finally let go of the stud.
 

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Heating the stud was to soften it a bit because, it was work hardened when it was broken off. It made it soft enough so I could force the torx bit into the hole and not wreck the bit. Yes it expanded when I heated it, but as it cooled it shrank. Then when I heated the aluminum, the threaded hole got bigger and finally let go of the stud.
I had heard of an arc welder being used, in the process of removing a broken bolt or stud, but had never known the details or seen it done, til now.
 

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I've removed studs or bolts that were broken FLUSH.. take a washer with a center a little smaller then the broken bolt/stud..WELD it to the stud(filling the hole of the washer).. the then take a nut, and weld it to the washer the same way... the heat from welding seems to allow a bit of expansion and then contraction to the bolt /stud, allowing the two metals (head and bolt) to "seperate".
I was informed to try this trick when I broke a drill bit off in one bolt/stud.. and then broke an extractor off in another. One came out .. the outer I had to "work" out, piece by piece with a tiny micro carbide bit on a dremel and a dental pick...
Oh the head was cast iron ..
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The torch is just a propane torch. The video was taken at the end of june and it's nice and warm then. It's cold as hell here now. Snow and rain and really short days. Got to heat the garage with the wood stove if I want to wrench on something. It sucks to know there is 5 months of winter still coming, but lots of time to build bikes.
 
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