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Sensei
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Discussion Starter #1
There are several things you will have to decide/determine before fabricating (or mounting) rear-sets. Number one on the list is " Will you have (or can you make) the clearance necessary to have them function well, comfortably, and foremost, SAFELY?".....
This usually entails relatively complete assembly except for the pegs and pedals (with at least the engine, exhaust, seat, and rear wheel mocked into riding position) , and some careful measurements and thought.
First, sit on the bike and locate where you want the pegs to be.....Simply moving them back to the "buddy-peg" position is common, but may not give enough height to locate the brake pedal in a comfortable position for your foot/ankle angle......Too high and your knees and hips will cramp.....Too low defeats their purpose, and they'll drag in turns (NOT GOOD!) Remember, your toes will now be positioned pointed down at the roadway when you are in the "tuck"........ Get seated comfortably, and have a friend mark where the front of your heel is placed (a bit of masking tape helps here) This is where the peg SHOULD be...... Are there existing mount points nearby? (How will you mount the components?)... Will the peg, pedal, linkages, and bracket (if necessary) clear the kicker?....Pipe? ...... Chain? Will the linkages bind on the swingarm anywhere in its arc?......
If the answers are everything will clear, you can proceed...If not, you'll have to re-engineer the linkage paths, or alter the position slightly (if it would still be comfortable.)
Once you have determined all this, it's time to fabricate.....

Now that you have the basic idea, I'll show how I proceed on the 90, with more detailed explainations and pics..... Stay tuned!.... :D Steve
 

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Cool, look forward to reading more on this too, I did spend the better part of 2 weekends over the winter working on rear sets on my cb 350, I had the shifter side done and working good with throttle linkage parts meant for a dual carb set up on a car, I was concerned about it lasting though, it didn't seem like it would stand up to alot of shifting. Then I got to the brake side, robbed some stuff of an old dirt bike played around with a few things but in the end decided to put it all back to stock for this riding season and tackle it next winter. The right side is really tight for room like you say, I played around with the idea of heel braking, Ever hear of anyone doing this?
 

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gord said:
.. I played around with the idea of heel braking, Ever hear of anyone doing this?
No, and I'd be surprised if you did. If you're mounting rearsets then the presumption is that you want to be set up to go around turns in a spirited way. When going fast on a race track and setting up for a turn you, typically, want to be on the balls of your feet so you can slide of the bike a bit to 'hang off', or, so you can transition from turn to turn quickly. If you want to use your rear brake it's counterproductive to be flat footed and trying to use your heel to do something.

With that said, when I'm racing I rarely, if ever, use the rear brake so it wouldn't be an issue but if you've got a space limitation and can adapt to its use on the street where a racing style of riding is not necessary (or recommended) then give it a try. If it doesn't work you can always change it around to something else.

Actually, there was a Formula 1 motorcycle racer a few years ago who damaged his foot but still needed to race and his race style was to use the rear brake (unusual). He adapted his hydraulic rear brake to thumb operation and had great success. I don't recall but he may have won the world championship that year.
 

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It doesn't sound like I've sold you on the heel brake technique :lol: I was holding the brake lever in differant positions, it is hard to tell how weird and impractical it would be without it mounted though. Either way it's riding season now so I'm not changing anything until next winter, just soaking up info, thanks :D
 

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gord said:
It doesn't sound like I've sold you on the heel brake technique :lol:
No, and you probably won't. However, I'm not the one that needs to be sold on it since I'm won't be riding it.

Good luck and have fun. Just because I wouldn't do it doesn't mean I'm not interested in how it turns out for you. :)
 

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Sensei
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Discussion Starter #7
I would also NOT recommend "heel braking".... The reason that shift and brake "sides" and motions are now standardized is too many accidents were occurring on "reverse pattern" bikes.....Your body tends to get into an "auto-pilot" or "muscle-memory" situation.... I am often reminded of this when riding my left-kick, right-shift, left brake Sprints..... One of the reasons I'm adding rear-sets is to make it easier for a "normal" rider to shift the 90.... The existing (1963) shift pattern is Neutral at the top, and push down to upshift (GP style)......By reversing one linkage lever arm, I'll be able to at least have the rider "toe-up" to up-shift, step-down to downshift (closer to and more like the current "conventional" shifting pattern instead of GP style)..... This also gives me the option of easily altering the pedal "throw" distance required to shift at the same time.....We'll go further into this when I get to the picture/diagram/full explaination stage here.....

Your solution may be the same as I shall have to use to allow kicker clearance.....(folding Brake pedal and folding footpeg)......
Steve
 

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MNellis said:
gord said:
.. I played around with the idea of heel braking, Ever hear of anyone doing this?
No, and I'd be surprised if you did. If you're mounting rearsets then the presumption is that you want to be set up to go around turns in a spirited way. When going fast on a race track and setting up for a turn you, typically, want to be on the balls of your feet so you can slide of the bike a bit to 'hang off', or, so you can transition from turn to turn quickly. If you want to use your rear brake it's counterproductive to be flat footed and trying to use your heel to do something.

With that said, when I'm racing I rarely, if ever, use the rear brake so it wouldn't be an issue but if you've got a space limitation and can adapt to its use on the street where a racing style of riding is not necessary (or recommended) then give it a try. If it doesn't work you can always change it around to something else.

Actually, there was a Formula 1 motorcycle racer a few years ago who damaged his foot but still needed to race and his race style was to use the rear brake (unusual). He adapted his hydraulic rear brake to thumb operation and had great success. I don't recall but he may have won the world championship that year.

**** Doohan! 5 time world champion.
500cc GRAND PRIX DEBUT 1989, Suzuka, Japan
500cc GRAND PRIX STARTS 137 (1989-99)
500cc GRAND PRIX WINS 54 (1st win - 1990 Hungaroring, Hungary)
500cc PODIUM FINISHES 95 (1st podium - 3rd, 1989 Hockenheim, Germany)
500cc POLE POSITIONS 58 (1st pole position - 1990, Jerez, Spain)
500cc WORLD CHAMPION 1994-95-96-97-98
(BTW-- Nicky Hayden from Owensboro Ky debuts on Ducati Sunday April 12TH under the lights at Quatar. It will be his 100TH start in MotoGP)
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And, the part about balls of the feet. Absolutely!!
The habit of "hanging 10" whether straight line riding or cornering can really get you in serious trouble. It will only take once for your toes to snag something and get bent back 180' under that peg! You won't do it again.
 

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Sensei
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Discussion Starter #9
OK.... Here is a sketch showing a "normal" Honda rear brake linkage (in #2 pencil)
The Green additions show the "negligable error" rear-set additions.... The lever lengths A,B,C,D show the original lever vs the rear-set lever.... As long as the ratios are the same (A/D vs B/C) the travel arc (not distance) and "feel" will remain as on the stock set-up. Travel distance is controlled by making both the A arms attached to the brake levers longer or shorter...



Sorry about the sketch quality..... I'll add pics of the "real thing" as I fabricate them this coming week.....
If this doesn't at least clarify the basic idea, ask questions please....
 

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Sensei
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Discussion Starter #10
The best part of this basic design is the height and/or distance back from the original footpeg position is irrelevant.... The only change necessary is to have a long enough secondary linkage rod (green) to suit........ Since both the linkage rods are in tension (rather than compression), a smaller diameter and lighter rod can be used......Simply fabricate or find a place to mount the rear-set peg that is suitable and comfortable for you....
 
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