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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey guys, I start thinking on how to properly store my bike for the winter and saw different thoughts out there. I know you put fuel stabilizer and fill up the tank, that's a given, but do you keep fuel in the carbs or dry them out. What are the pros and cons? Someone at work suggested to spray WD-40 all over the bike to prevent it to rust and keep things shinny and balck. You can wash it in the spring and/or it will burn off the engine and exhaust system. I used to do it on my snow machines and it worked really well, had the nicest exhaust and slide rails out there, but do you do it on motorcycles as well? And what else do I forget?

Thx
 

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Hey guys, I start thinking on how to properly store my bike for the winter and saw different thoughts out there. I know you put fuel stabilizer and fill up the tank, that's a given, but do you keep fuel in the carbs or dry them out. What are the pros and cons? Someone at work suggested to spray WD-40 all over the bike to prevent it to rust and keep things shinny and balck. You can wash it in the spring and/or it will burn off the engine and exhaust system. I used to do it on my snow machines and it worked really well, had the nicest exhaust and slide rails out there, but do you do it on motorcycles as well? And what else do I forget?

Thx
Instead of WD-40, use Boeshield.
The problem I have with draining carbs is, you may find your carb gaskets and seals dried out come spring.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Instead of WD-40, use Boeshield.
The problem I have with draining carbs is, you may find your carb gaskets and seals dried out come spring.

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I agree on the gaskets! Will have to check on Boeshield, never heard.
 

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I also spray all of the chrome with Rust Check, spray some into the exhaust as well. I then put rubber stoppers into the ends of the exhaust to prevent rodents from finding a home for the winter. I know that the draw back to this is that there is no air circulation into the exhaust. I had a friend whose bike stunk the entire summer because he had a family of mice spend the winter in his exhaust. I also wax all of the paint, put fogging oil in the cylinders, clean and lub the chain. This is just me but I also bring the seat indoors for the winter. I figure the freeze/thaw cycles of Southern Ontario can't be any good for the vinyl. Ya I know it is overboard.
 

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I take the mufflers off, tank off, headlight off, speed / tacho off and the carbs off the bike (for putting them in a dry and warm place) oil in the cylinders and set the engine timing that both valves are closed, spark plugs out, and a oily cloth in the spark plus holes. Spray oil into the exhaust and intake ports from the outside and close them with an oily cloth. I spray (cover) the bike with acid-free white vaseline (spray) and use silicone oil for the tyres. Then I place the bike on the mainstand and put someting underneath the engine to left also the front wheel from the floor. At last I pour the engine full with oil. O yes, and the battery will be stored in a warm dry place too....

In the Dutch winters the temperatures and humidity are fluctuating all the time, so condensation of water is is the biggest enemy on the cold steel and aluminium of the bike.
 

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I take the mufflers off, tank off, headlight off, speed / tacho off and the carbs off the bike (for putting them in a dry and warm place) oil in the cylinders and set the engine timing that both valves are closed, spark plugs out, and a oily cloth in the spark plus holes. Spray oil into the exhaust and intake ports from the outside and close them with an oily cloth. I spray (cover) the bike with acid-free white vaseline (spray) and use silicone oil for the tyres. Then I place the bike on the mainstand and put someting underneath the engine to left also the front wheel from the floor. At last I pour the engine full with oil. O yes, and the battery will be stored in a warm dry place too....

In the Dutch winters the temperatures and humidity are fluctuating all the time, so condensation of water is is the biggest enemy on the cold steel and aluminium of the bike.
A monumental waste of time.

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A wool carpet and a dustcover, maintance charge every 2 weekend, inside a uninsulated garage. South Norway, 15-40ish humidity and all from -2 and up to -15. But never had colder than -8 inside garage, then we had -27 outside.... Never had any problems with my bike, lawnmover or snowblower. Still riding here btw, next week is the last before I park it for winter....

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A monumental waste of time.
It just takes a few hours, not that bad. My 1966 CB450 K0 is original, chrome, cables and paint also, not restored, guess why....
I see all the fully restored bikes, with new chrome and paint, and I think "what a waste of money", and on top of that the value of a restored bike is lower.

btw, I rather have very low temperatures, because then there's no humidity in the air, in the case of the Netherlands, the temperature is around -2 to 10 degrees Celsius

I just wrote up what I do, not how anyone should do it...
 

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I've read some interesting stories in the British motorbike press. This company offers bags to fit your bike along with moisture monitoring and removal equipment. https://www.autopyjama.com/permabag-engl/motorbike/. I try to follow aircraft manufacturers recommendations for storage. This is a good article on the subject: https://www.cessnaflyer.org/mainten...g-interrupted-modern-engine-preservation.html. The key points are:
1. geographical location affects the level of storage required - moisture is the enemy,to lakes, oceans, rivers and in humid regions there's a greater need for engine preservation than those operated in arid regions.
2. Clean engine oil will provide more internal engine corrosion protection.
3. Engines with over 50 hours will have better protection because of varnish build up. If your engine is freshly rebuilt you may want to do more.
4. If you are storing the bike for over 30 days spray the cylinder with preservation oil. You can use aviation oil, but a light household petroleum oil will work, but gun oil is very close to aircraft preservation oil.

For me, I fill the gas tank to the brim with the lowest % ethanol gas I can get. This web page lists pure gas outlets around the country. https://www.pure-gas.org/extensions/map.html. I run the engine out of gas then drain the float bowls.

WD-40 was designed to protect aerospace structures from corrosion. I never have done it but have read many others who do. I wouldn't spray it on. The applications spec sheets I have read say to use a rag to rub it on the surface.

Finally, I try to ride the bikes at least once a month. In my part of the world it is hard to do in the December to February time frame. During this time I will idle the bikes as hot as I can get them. And I use a trickle/ float charger.
 

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I generally leave it coated with its protective layer of oil and dirt.
I agree! But one more thing, never put the bike away with a mechanical problem. Always fix it first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
4. If you are storing the bike for over 30 days spray the cylinder with preservation oil. You can use aviation oil, but a light household petroleum oil will work, but gun oil is very close to aircraft preservation oil.

Do you mean the ouside or inside of the cylinders or both?
 

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For me, I fill the gas tank to the brim with the lowest % ethanol gas I can get. This web page lists pure gas outlets around the country. https://www.pure-gas.org/extensions/map.html. I run the engine out of gas then drain the float bowls.

Finally, I try to ride the bikes at least once a month. In my part of the world it is hard to do in the December to February time frame. During this time I will idle the bikes as hot as I can get them. And I use a trickle/ float charger.
Seconding both of these. I've got a bike in Seattle at my dad's and I go back home twice a year, Christmas and summer. I always run the carbs out of gas on my last ride, and have never had a problem with gaskets drying out prematurely. Gas sitting for 6 months can gum up jets requiring removal (although my bike in Seattle is a 550K, so a little tougher to get those carbs off than a twin). Dunno if the cold of Canada will make a difference.

And if you can, I'd second the starting up and riding around. Although I'm guessing that you'd be snowed in and there wouldn't be anywhere to go. In that case, starting it up every once in a while could cause more harm than good with condensation.
 

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You said it, Brother!
The bikes also hate getting cold as well so move them inside the house too. haha.
Definitely one way to save the time it takes to remove the battery!
 

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Condensation shouldn't be a big problem in Sudbury during the winter, cold is dry. The temperature swings through spring and fall are harder on the bike then the cold. I don't winterize bikes, boat or ATV's. Keep the battery warm and charged and the gas tank topped and just run the bike until warm once a month through Dec, Jan, Feb, ride it early Nov and late March and you'll be fine.
 
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