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So I was at the scrapyard and they have a bunch of stainless steel shelving etc... that looks like it came from a commercial kitchen or somewhere.

They had used a cutting torch to cut some and it was rusted. Was it the extreme heat from the torch that caused it to rust along the cut?

If I bought a piece to use for trim, seat pan, side plates or whatever how would I cut stainless steel and keep it from rusting?
 

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mitchellsk said:
So I was at the scrapyard and they have a bunch of stainless steel shelving etc... that looks like it came from a commercial kitchen or somewhere.

They had used a cutting torch to cut some and it was rusted. Was it the extreme heat from the torch that caused it to rust along the cut?

If I bought a piece to use for trim, seat pan, side plates or whatever how would I cut stainless steel and keep it from rusting?
Yes the heat actually changed the molecular structure of the metal, and may have burned out the "stainless" elements of the metal blend in the molten area.

Maybe cut it with a slow-speed band saw or something??
Not sure, never tried it.
 

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tbpmusic said:
mitchellsk said:
So I was at the scrapyard and they have a bunch of stainless steel shelving etc... that looks like it came from a commercial kitchen or somewhere.

They had used a cutting torch to cut some and it was rusted. Was it the extreme heat from the torch that caused it to rust along the cut?

If I bought a piece to use for trim, seat pan, side plates or whatever how would I cut stainless steel and keep it from rusting?
Yes the heat actually changed the molecular structure of the metal, and may have burned out the "stainless" elements of the metal blend in the molten area.

Maybe cut it with a slow-speed band saw or something??
Not sure, never tried it.
Yep, your absolutely right. The key words to cutting it being SLOW SPEED, sharp band saw blade and a lot of cutting oil. Great stuff, but tough as all get out.

High heat of the cutting torch melts the stainless and in essence, remakes it in that area, into a different composition.

Have fun, wouldn't wish working with the stuff on my worse enemy..

Henry
 

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Thanks, thats about what I thought. I haven't bought any but that stuff sure looks nice and theres a ton of it. Maybe some pneumatic snips would be best if I try out a piece.
 

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I'm sure these guys are right about how the heat affected the stainless. Stainless comes in a large number of grades and some are more corrosion resistant than others, but even the least ressitant holds up pretty well. A little polish or wax is all you'll need.

It is tough to work with though, I've got some covers off a rug beater from a car wash that i have drug out messed with and put back several times just because i didn't have the paitents to deal with it.

Ernie
 

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the usual apporach is drill your holes within the piece and then drill relief cut holes. Then a metal bandsaw is best to rough cut the pieces. Grinder comes next to cut to line and shape as needed. Take your time allow for cooling intervals as you go. Then hand filing is TOUGH going but will clean up the edges nicely. It'll take time and work but i think the results are SOoooooo worth it!
 
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