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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy compadres!

I posted a little while ago about discovering odd giblets in my side cover when I was adjusting the cam. That turned out to be pieces of starter clutch--THANKS to the folks on this forum for identifying said giblets. Good news! I fixed that and rebuilt the starter while I was at it. I've done a fair bit of work, but never rebuilt an electric motor, so it was really interesting. The starter kicks over great, sounds like it ought to-- quiet, without clanking and marbles rattling. Awesome!

But... I have a CL360, which required removing the exhaust to get at the side cover. Here's my dilemma: when I removed the RH ("passenger side") downpipe, one of the studs had been replaced by an oversized bolt and nut. It's something standard, not metric. I got it off with a 13mm, but it was sloppy on there. The nut, threaded down onto the bolt, tightened down onto the exhaust collar. Make sense? Still surprised I never noticed it, but it never leaked so I guess I never looked.

I got new copper gaskets for it, and all I have left to finish up is the exhaust. But now I'm wondering: should I gingerly reinstall this bolt/nut Frankenstein or actually attempt to repair it properly with a heli-coil or similar? I simply don't have time or resources to pull the head, remove the engine, etc. etc. I really just want to putt around the neighborhood, or maybe take a Saturday cruise to southern Ohio for some twisties and a cheeseburger once in a while (120 mile round trip). It's a decent bike, but not a "concours d'elegance" kinda motorcycle.

Thanks, again, for your help!

Jim B.
Grove City, OH
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Crud, I meant to include a pic. Here's a photo, I threaded the bolt/nut back into the head for a lil bit better visual. Obviously, missing the collar and so forth. Imagine an exhaust collar being pinched by that nut. WP_20180823_21_13_59_Pro.jpg Also, I don't know why the pic is sideways. I assure you, the bike is vertical!

Jim
 

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On the one hand, if the bolt is tight and giving a good seal between the pipe and the head, it’s probably fine. On the other hand, gross, replace that :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's exactly what I'm thinking! I mean, someone managed to run a tiny bit larger bolt into the head without buggering it up, and I can run the bolt back in on the threads it "made", but man this seems like a sketchy repair. What worries me is, once I get the ports cleaned up and torque the new gaskets down, what's gonna happen? Also, though it's slightly ratty, the bike is 100 percent original aside from maintenance items: tires, chain, shocks (Progressives, believe it or not!)

At least, if all else fails, I have a V Strom 650 Adventure as a backup, so there's that!

Cheers!

Jim B.
Grove City, OH
 

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But you don't "torque down" on exhaust gaskets, you only tighten them until they seal. If the existing repair still works its a successful repair. I might replace the rusty bolt and nut, but if the concept works keep it.
I've made the same repair before, but it was on the #2 pipe of a 4 cylinder bike and was hard to see. Yours may be more of a visible blemish.
 

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Since it is no longer the original size hole, and since you will likely have no problem removing the last bit, I might suggest looking into a heli coil insert to bring it back to the original size.
 

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What someone did was drill out the (most likely stripped) M6 tapped hole in the head and tapped it out to 1/4-20 or maybe 5/16-18.

The cleanest thing you could do would be to replace that standard bolt with a standard stud (may be able to find one at an automotive supply or hardware store, or just fabricate one from a standard bolt using the proper die) and just run it as-is.

If the original hole has been hogged out too far, you'll never be able to run a Heli-Coil or other proper thread repair. The next step would be to pull the head and have the hole welded up, then chuck it up in a mill and have it drilled and tapped back to M6. Alternately, you could just chuck the head into a mill, have the existing hole drilled and tapped to something way bigger (like a 1/2-13), then install a "plug" cut from a 1/2-13 bolt that gets threaded into place and held with red Loctite, then machined flat to the head surface, and drilled and tapped to M6.

I'd just run the proper standard stud and ignore it until it causes problems, which it likely won't.
 
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