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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi everyone i am a new member seeking some help , i have been searching for one of these beautiful old bikes for 3 years and recently found the bike i wanted as a teenager in a barn where it has been for about 35 years .unfortunately it has no documents or license plate so i am guessing the age at moment as i have been researching on the internet and have found lots of conflicting information . now i am hoping to find some people with a love for these old bikes that i can learn something from and i would like to hear anyones thoughts on what to do with my bike ..caferacer ? flattracker ? or original restoration its a CB125T possibly a 1969 k3 what do you think ? I am not sure what models came to the uk and what years the models changed

Frame = CB125-4044969 Engine=CB125E-4045087 Key +T3364

Now i have read on various sites that 1969 was the last year with knee pads on the tank and the frame numbers start with a 4 in 1969 a 5 in 1970 a 6 in 71 and so on not sure if these facts are true so i thought time to ask some experts .. ive also read somewhere there is some numbers on the wiring loom under the tank ? and that the key with a T prefix is late 60's ..The front of the engine is stamped 124cc and the clocks are in the headlight and the rev counter goes up to 14000 rpm and red lines at 12000 rpm
i am finding it difficult to find any site with any details of ageing this bike so i'm hoping you guys have some knowledge of these little hondas

i would really appreciate any information or your personal opinions on which way to go with the restoration .. thank you for taking the time to read my post .. many thanks Jay
 

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Nice find........stored for over 30 years, then loads of stuff will be stuck, be extremely patient/careful with the engine etc., as valves may/will be stuck.

You know of cmsnl for the exploded views which will help you.

You know of david silver spares ?

After studying the cmsnl exploded views and a workshop manual, remove the spark plugs and pour in some 2t oily petrol or similar and leave for a day or 2.

remove relevant engine covers, the alternator rotor cover on the left of the bike, also the rocker cover hex alloy caps, to expose the valve working clearance adjusting screws/lock nuts etc, and spray in some penetrant, to lub the tops of the valves.

If it where mine I would also remove the carbs and exhaust headers, to allow lub access to the valves and their stem, that may well be/are "stuck". Lub and leave for 2 days applying lub several times.

If you just whizz the engine over on the starter or kick starter and a valves is stuck, you will really damage the engine, bending a valve and possibly breaking a valve guide !!!!!!!!

After 2 days of regular lub/penetrant application, I would attempt to "turn the engine over" via the bolt on the alternator rotor, VERY CAREFULY with 2 assistants eyes looking for movement ( lack of movement more like as that means a stuck valve !!!!! ) of the valves. They need to open and close.

This is your first important hurdle, be very careful else wreck the engine, which would be a pity, as its survived this long.

TAKE YOUR TIME !

Remember all nuts and bolts will be seized/corroded in/on, particularly the exhaust header to head nuts. Penetrant penetrant penetrant, p[atience and some heat will help greatly.

Drain the engine oil/sludge and look for metallic particles, and, study the exploded views for a centrifugal oil filter etc......

I think I have a manual for this bike, will check later for you.

I cannot stress enough, importantly, for you to research, take your time, be very patient and enjoy the experience.
 

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Cool! Will you be able to get it registered with no papers?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thank you so much Drydreamer this is exactly the sort of important valuable expertise i am looking for. thankfully i have not touched it other than a jetwash since i pulled it out the barn because i wanted to do as much research as possible before starting work .. i have so far managed to get keys from david silver which arrived today ..ignition works but the reason it was left in the barn was the steering lock has a broken key stuck in it and is in the locked position which i will attempt to ease out later today .. thank you fantastic information
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks ctrider yes hopefully i will as i know it was a uk registered bike not a import so i have applied to the DVLA who should be able to track the reg number from the frame number but as all government department it will take 4 to 6 weeks
 

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Please, please, don't ruin it by going the flat tracker or café racer route. Apart from other considerations, think how silly you'll look hunched over clip-ons and rearsets whilst the local teens come flying past on their mopeds :lol:

It looks as though you have the potential for a nice bike there. I'm pretty sure that a lot of the parts are common to the CB175.

You may be surprised by the DVLA. When I applied for a UK registration for my US imported CL175, I got the V5 back by return of post. I was probably lucky, it'll be interesting to see how long it takes when I apply for a registration for my CB 175.
 

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I know, those damn mopeds/scooters beat me off the line every time, and I'm on a 350!
Embarrassing to say the least
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks richards. i think i might just clean it up and get it running nicely first and use it with the patina look before i do a full resto .the more i look at it the more i love the originality of it.i just want it to look cool and different but i have no intention to make the bike or myself look stupid and yes i think you're right from the research i've done it appears the cb175 is a very similar bike. as for the DVLA i really hope they are as quick for me as they were with you but judging from the phone call i made to them i hope they open the post faster than they answer the phone l.o.l.
 

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Hi JJ,

So your an "oldie".........

Anyways by now your little beauty will be nice and warm and dry sitting in a clean, dry, tidy, well organised well lit workspace with your first can of penetrant used up, the run off or drips being cleaned off the painted floor, or absorbed by old carpet or cardboard floor protector, listening to classical music no doubt.

This helps with your struggle with adversity.

Get another 3 tins of penetrant, money well spent.

Don't put all your trust in computers for recording your progress as when they die, all the info dies with them.

Did you take a picture of its former resting place?

Keep a log with pictures of your progress, a before, during and after record, a book of your and the bikes "journey".

Print off the cmsnl exploded views, priceless info, a fantastic resource and free !

Are the valves free and open and close all ok?, or is that Sundays event ?

Could you post a close up of the left side of the engine please.

Be advised that when the engine is running, do not try to select a gear as the clutch will surely be "stuck", a crash into gear will not do the dogs any good.

Computer fans are good for engine run cooling.

With a dummy fuel tank and 2t in the fuel, let the engine tick over for periods, cooled by the fans.

After several engine runs and when the engine is warm/hot, place bike on its centre stand, something better than the mop bucket, so the bike is safe and steady and will not roll /fall off.

With engine off ( and rear wheel capable of being rotated ) select a high gear. Start the engine with the clutch pulled in. Blipping the throttle, so the rear wheel experiences run and over run conditions. Other than stripping down for proper cleaning etc., this is the gentlest way of freeing off a stuck clutch.

When the clutch cover is off, you can clean out the sump floor of all the sludge/crap etc. lying there, as well as the clutch drum/basket and centrifugal oil filter. The oil pump filter screen can also be cleaned at this time. Make sure you can get a clutch cover gasket, or make one, paying particular attention to any oilways in the clutch cover.

JIS screw drivers ( as well as hex sockets ) are great but be careful using an impact driver. Sometimes a small sharp centre punch and SMALL hammer is the way to go, particularly on pre mangled screws, else drill the screw heads off and deal with the remains when the cover is off. Sometimes even pre mangled screw can be got out after being "shocked".

How is the rear wheel "spacer" , free and rotates on the axle ?
 

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How is this project going, and, you now realise that this bike will be mot AND tax EXEMPT ! ( but will need an MOT for tax exemption, typical dvla, vosa and british government eh ).

Its always better to get the yearly MOT pass, even if its still just a basic safety check and a bit of a farce . Its an "independent" safety check, someone else's opinion rather than yours.

PS keep this bike well locked up else THE SNOWMAN may "borrow" it ! ( cb160 ? )
 

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Great find, very rare in UK, my uncle had one similar way back when I was a kid, he was always missing gear shifts resulting in a bent valve or two, he would bring it to our house for repair, Dad would bash them straight on the back of the vice, Dad had a very low opinion of Japanese bikes in those days.
I bought a '75 CB200 a couple or three years ago, been stood since '84, cleaned the rust inside the tank using white vinegar, ultra-sonic carb clean, oil change, new battery, primed the oil with the plugs out, then she started first press, rode her round the garden with the clutch in, just as the clutch freed off the brake linings detached themselves and jammed the rear wheel, good thing I hadn't been tempted to road test her.
 

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just as the clutch freed off the brake linings detached themselves and jammed the rear wheel, good thing I hadn't been tempted to road test her
I'd read about this sort of thing in the magazines, not really sure that I believed it, until I recently bought a used brake plate and found that the linings had come adrift from the back shoes.


Games Auto part Tire Automotive wheel system Automotive tire
 

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One of those easily overlooked things, I've had it happen a few times before, mostly on trials bikes where the brakes have been subject to copious amounts of mud and water, and I recall a RD250B that I "rescued" had the same trouble, corrosion between the aluminium shoe and the brake lining.
 
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