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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everybody! My name is Alex and I’m from San Diego, California. After many years of wanting a bike I was FINALLY able to get my first bike a couple weeks ago: A 1972 Honda CB450 DOHC twin. I’m here for help on parts and mods as I would like to add some special touches over time (new seat, tires etc)

Any customization and part guidance would be amazing! ??

Thanks!
 

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Welcome to the group. A bit more information would be helpful, like the condition of the bike and your experience level, both riding and wrenching. If you haven't already done it I would suggest the MSF basic rider course.

Browsing through the project logs here might provide some inspiration but I suggest starting out by getting the bike safe and reliable before you start on the mods. Here's some guidance that can help to make that happen.

http://www.hondatwins.net/forums/67...n/16105-basic-checklist-new-you-old-bike.html

Got pictures?:p
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I start the course at the end of February, and I have no riding or maintenance experience. The bike is in amazing condition. Bike is completely stock. Clean carbs, new tires. The only things are that the kickstart does not work and the handle bars have the slightest wiggle to them. The previous owner said that he tightened them to the best of his abilities but there still seem to be just a tiny bit loose.

Also, my buddy rode from LA to SD for me and the battery is now dead. What’s the standard procedure? Do I buy a new one entirely? If so, where’s the best place to get one online?

Obviously I have A LOT to learn but I am super excited to have this as my first bike and really get to know it!
 

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Buy a charger for the battery - you can get a 12V charger at any auto parts store. Get one that is a "tender" as well - doesn't keep on charging after it's "full".

Battery shouldn't be dead from a trip - it could be a bad battery, could be a problem with the charging system, could be a short. But we don't need to go there just yet. Could be an old battery :).

THIS IS JUST MY OPINION but I tend to like plain old wet-cell batteries and you can buy those in auto parts stores as well. The one battery I bought online stunk, so I'm a little biased.

Get those handlebars tended to and show us some pics! That may explain why they're loose.

Welcome to the madness.
 

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Welcome, lots to learn but its all fun.
 

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Couple of possibilities for the handlebar looseness - first, the conical bushings in the crown (upper triple clamp) can get compressed and/or worn and make the handlebar mount posts a little loose in them, which can't be tightened beyond a certain point because the mount posts have a shoulder that prevents the nut from being tightened any further, or it's possible that the posts are slightly loose in the lower handlebar clamp where they are molded (or pressed) together. If the second possibility is the case, the handlebar mount posts will have to be replaced. while you're there, you may as well replace the bushings too. Items #4 and #5 at the link below

https://www.cmsnl.com/honda-cb450k5-1972-usa_model453/partslist/F++03.html#results

I wish you good luck with the riding course. Always good to see another vintage Honda enthusiast, especially a DOHC 450 owner!
 

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Paint looks like a '73. See if your SN is CB450-6XXXXXX, if so it is a '73, a '72 would be CB450-5XXXXXX.

Charge the battery, start the bike, put a meter on the battery and rev the motor to about 3000 and see if the voltage goes up. If no, you need to troubleshoot the charging system.

The handle bars do have a slight wiggle, that is normal. They are dampened with rubber bushings.
 

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Neeto! Waaay back when, I bought a used '70 CB450. Since it was my first bike and my only mode of transportation, I gave it lots of TLC and learned on my own how to work on it. Japanese bikes were new to rural Colorado.

I was struggling with battery issues as you are and I recall my boss at the Texaco station saying "these Jap bikes have an alternator, they need electricity to make electricity, buy a battery and clean all your connections". I did a life was good. No matter how I abused that bike, it never let me down.

Your bike is in much nicer shape than mine was. But they are complicated, so buy a manual and learn how to work on it. Enjoy!
 

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Actually, the 450 has a permanent magnet alternator and though they don't run well with a low battery - too low and they won't run at all - they do make charging power without the need for voltage for an excited field like the 4 cylinder Hondas have
 
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