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I've been looking for a decent video to show how to rivet a cam chain, but there don't seem to be many out there.
This is the most informative chain riveting video I could find, it covers drive chain breaking and riveting,
but much of the info applies to cam chain breaking and riveting as well.

The informative part begins about 13 minutes in.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've been looking for a decent video to show how to rivet a cam chain, but there don't seem to be many out there.
This is the most informative chain riveting video I could find, it covers drive chain breaking and riveting,
but much of the info applies to cam chain breaking and riveting as well.

The informative part begins about 13 minutes in.

Thanks for the reply with a great video. I’m confused because the product description says it’s a “press-type” master link and NOT a rivet-type.



What the heck is a press-type master link?


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Yep, and I'm more comfortable with the rivet type links... at least when you mushroom the ends of the pins on a rivet link, you have a better feeling that the side plate can't come off
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yep, and I'm more comfortable with the rivet type links... at least when you mushroom the ends of the pins on a rivet link, you have a better feeling that the side plate can't come off
Can you elaborate? Are you saying with the master link I have, I’m just supposed to press the plate on with a chain tool and that’s it? No riveting or clip or anything to secure it?


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That's correct. All you need to do is press fit the master link with a chain tool.
Just make sure both pins are through and the link is fitted evenly.

Don't worry about it, it will stay and won't go anywhere. I have used a ton of press fit master links and none have failed yet.
 

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I'm pretty sure the chains from common motors are all 219H in which case the master link from 4into1 will not work on them.
I wasn't sure but from the picture at the top, the links look like the DID 450 chain except it says "Japan" on them instead of DID
 

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The 219H EK chains are also made in Japan.
 

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Just chiming in here. I have the same CMC replacement cam chain for my CB360. I was also concerned that it is just a "press on" link without a need to mushroom the ends. I confirmed that with contacting CMC about this directly, and I was reassured that it would not come off. I think the types of pins that allow for mushrooming are hollowed at the ends to allow for deformation. The link in this case was a PITA to press on, so I can't imagine it going anywhere after installation!
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just chiming in here. I have the same CMC replacement cam chain for my CB360. I was also concerned that it is just a "press on" link without a need to mushroom the ends. I confirmed that with contacting CMC about this directly, and I was reassured that it would not come off. I think the types of pins that allow for mushrooming are hollowed at the ends to allow for deformation. The link in this case was a PITA to press on, so I can't imagine it going anywhere after installation!
Thanks dude! That is a relief. Can you expand about how you pressed the master link down? I checked out your thread and it looks like you had trouble with CMC’s chain tool.

I opened the corresponding EK chain master link (press-fit type), and found that the master link plate was not easy to "press on". Instead of using the dedicated "press plates" in the chain breaker, which were sized for a drive chain, I worked the master link plate onto the master link pins little by little each side with a depressed anvil and a hollow plate.
What is a depressed anvil and a hollow plate and how did you use them to press fit the master link?


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Tough for me to describe since I don't have the tool with me where I am currently residing, but I'll do my best to remember.

I think all of the "anvils" that came with the CMC chain breaker kit were meant for smashing a hollow pin to mushroom it, none really seemed to be specially designed for a press-fit master link plate. What I ended up using is one of the adapter pieces that looked like a cone with a hole in it (nipple), where the hole was larger than the diameter of the pin. I used that piece to compress the master link plate onto the pins, by compressing it a little very carefully one side at a time, until the total outside dimension of the two plates matched those of the other plates in the linkage.

OK refer to this image to follow along with me. What I did is I used the center anvil with a hole in it to compress the plate onto the pin a little bit at a time each side


On the other side of the tool (where the master link with two pins are) I used the flat rectangular piece with no holes in it to compress that side
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Tough for me to describe since I don't have the tool with me where I am currently residing, but I'll do my best to remember.

I think all of the "anvils" that came with the CMC chain breaker kit were meant for smashing a hollow pin to mushroom it, none really seemed to be specially designed for a press-fit master link plate. What I ended up using is one of the adapter pieces that looked like a cone with a hole in it (nipple), where the hole was larger than the diameter of the pin. I used that piece to compress the master link plate onto the pins, by compressing it a little very carefully one side at a time, until the total outside dimension of the two plates matched those of the other plates in the linkage.

OK refer to this image to follow along with me. What I did is I used the center anvil with a hole in it to compress the plate onto the pin a little bit at a time each side


On the other side of the tool (where the master link with two pins are) I used the flat rectangular piece with no holes in it to compress that side
Thanks man, you're the bomb. I'll grab that tool and give it a go.
 

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Mike - did you notice the reviews on it? More than a few said it's a cheapie, and the Stockton chain breaker/staker I bought from Amazon was a piece of cheese too. I used it to break the new chain for my 450 and the first time it worked perfectly, but the second time the "tool steel" tip of the breaker bent. I ended up modifying the staking tool part by grinding it to a somewhat blunt point and it stakes chains decently now but the use as a cam chain breaker is pretty much over. To break a new one, I just use a dremel to grind the tops off the pins in the link and then gently pry the side plate off, but you have to be careful using a dremel or you can nick up other links
 
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