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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK so before I start smashing things how are these in here?? I already ordered NOS replacements...

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IMG_2396.jpg
 

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OK so before I start smashing things how are these in here?? I already ordered NOS replacements...

Thanks-
They're probably just rusted in the dampers - they're like studs that bolt into the sprocket and then the stud-like posts slip into the damper bushings
 

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OK so before I start smashing things how are these in here?? I already ordered NOS replacements...

Thanks-

View attachment 222410
I can't see the picture, but it sounds like you're trying to remove the rear sprocket studs from the drive cushes. That's the easy part, wait until you try to remove the drive cushes. More on that in a minute. Use Kroil or PB Blaster on the studs and tap them out from the back. For the drive cushes, a 1" bi-metal hole saw in a drill press is the perfect size to remove them. You can use a hand drill if you're careful, I've done it.

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^^^yes, I'd forgotten that they are accessible from behind - a good drift punch and hammer effort should do it, but a soak with PB Blaster prior will help
 

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For the drive cushes, a 1" bi-metal hole saw in a drill press is the perfect size to remove them. You can use a hand drill if you're careful, I've done it.

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I'm about to remove the cushions from a CL350 rear hub, how do you keep the hole saw centered in the bushing?
 

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I'm about to remove the cushions from a CL350 rear hub, how do you keep the hole saw centered in the bushing?
Clamp your hub down firm in a drill press , if available. Before I had a drill press, I eyeballed it with a hand drill. Just have to be very careful.

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I've just been though the process of removing dampers - well half through; it was such a mission that I decided to take a rest after getting two out.

After trying all the suggestions I found here - heat, hammer, drilling the rubber, cutting rubber with a screwdriver (with acetone to try to soften the rubber) and cutting the inner sleeve with a hacksaw - I eventually went and bought a hole saw and drilled the rubbers out. This was easy and I just put one foot on the rim and lined it up carefully.

Getting the outer sleeve out was another mission. I cut two slots in hte sleeve and then used a rod and BIG hammer to bash it out from the back. You have to hit it HARD!! In teh next one I tried to save time and only cut one slot. It worked but was more difficult than with 2 slots.

At this point - 2 hours or more after starting (and that was just yesterday) – I decided to take a rest and leave the others for another day.

The bushes are not reusable!;)

Rear Wheel Dampers - Remnants.jpg

Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So now that I'm reading these stories about the business removing the drive cushes I'm wondering if I remove the bolts and cushes at all. There was no problem with them as far as I know I was just being anal and replacing anything that looked crappy on the bike. Obviously these haven't been touched since it left Japan. If I do it are there any tricks to getting the new cushes in?
 

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So now that I'm reading these stories about the business removing the drive cushes I'm wondering if I remove the bolts and cushes at all. There was no problem with them as far as I know I was just being anal and replacing anything that looked crappy on the bike. Obviously these haven't been touched since it left Japan. If I do it are there any tricks to getting the new cushes in?
My understanding is heat the drum up in the 250-300 range after having frozen the new bushings for a day or so and they will drive in easily.
 

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So now that I'm reading these stories about the business removing the drive cushes I'm wondering if I remove the bolts and cushes at all. There was no problem with them as far as I know I was just being anal and replacing anything that looked crappy on the bike. Obviously these haven't been touched since it left Japan. If I do it are there any tricks to getting the new cushes in?
That's what I think, I left them on my racer and my cl. They ain't goin anywhere.
 

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So now that I'm reading these stories about the business removing the drive cushes I'm wondering if I remove the bolts and cushes at all. There was no problem with them as far as I know I was just being anal and replacing anything that looked crappy on the bike. Obviously these haven't been touched since it left Japan. If I do it are there any tricks to getting the new cushes in?
After my experience, I would recommend that approach. There's a lot to be said for the "If it ain't broke, don't fix it!" way of life.

I'll be putting - or trying to – the new ones in today or tomorrow. Not sure how I'll heat the housing as it is still attached to the rim - probably carefully with a blow torch. I'll let you know how it goes.

If anyone does have any tips/tricks please speak up now.

Sean
 

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If you don't want to unthread and rethread the spokes (a learning experience in itself :D), and you have a hot air gun, you could try resting the wheel flat on some blocks, with the gun braced to blow into the hollow side. I'd be wary of using a torch, because it will make hot spots that could blister the clear coat and discolor the aluminum. If that's all you have, be very careful, and use the widest flame attachment you can find.
 

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Thanks for advice Rick.

Haven't got there yet; Xmas intervened! :)

When using teh torch, I keep moving it around to avoid overly heating one spot.

Tomorrow maybe will get to it.

Happy Xmas

Sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
OK so after cracking the hub casing my NOS hub arrived and also the new bolts and bushings. Before I make any more sadness happen tomorrow I wanted to check with people here about what I'm about to do. I'm putting the bushings and the bolts in the freezer tonight. Tomorrow I'll heat up the hub with a heat gun (not a torch) and install the cold bushings/bolts by tapping them in with a piece of wood over them and hammer. This sound right to everyone? Also I assume I tap the bushings in first and then the bolts (not put the bolts in the bushings and tap the two part assembly in as one) right?
Thanks-
DW
 

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OK so after cracking the hub casing my NOS hub arrived and also the new bolts and bushings. Before I make any more sadness happen tomorrow I wanted to check with people here about what I'm about to do. I'm putting the bushings and the bolts in the freezer tonight. Tomorrow I'll heat up the hub with a heat gun (not a torch) and install the cold bushings/bolts by tapping them in with a piece of wood over them and hammer. This sound right to everyone? Also I assume I tap the bushings in first and then the bolts (not put the bolts in the bushings and tap the two part assembly in as one) right?
Thanks-
DW
Sounds good, but I would also put anti-seize or grease on the bushings before hammering in. Sometimes it takes a press to get them in.

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Wait grease or anti seize? I didn't think you wanted any kind of lubricant between the bushings and the case...???
 

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I literally did this this afternoon. The "bolts" are actually pins the slide into the bushings, nothing to do there. Leave the bushings in the freezer overnight. Heat the hub up in the oven to 200 degrees, I used the barbecue. I positioned each bushing, doing one at a time, and tapped it into position. Then I used a socket that was @.005" smaller than the bushing to drive it in. Use the back side of the socket so you have the widest drive face possible. You do want to have them below the surface of the hub, slightly recessed, there's a chamfer so get it to the bottom of that.
 
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