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Rince your tank out with hot water then fill to the top. For a 4 to 5 gal tank add a cup of Arm and Hammer Super Washing Soda, NOT baking soda. Use an electrode, like a welding rod through a rubber plug to stop up the fill hole. Connect rod to a 12 volt battery charger; positive to the electrode and negative to the tank body. Be patient, it will take 5 or more days. Repeat if not completely clean.

Keep your tank from rusting by keeping fuel in it.

And, I am one who would not recommend POR-15 or any other liner. When you have the experience of it peeling off, and it will, you'll understand why. Just keep fuel in your bike !

This info comes in part from the boys over at http://www.kawasakitriplesworldwide.com
 

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I've done it this way several times and it works great. Big diff here is I hook the positive to the tank and the negative to the rod. It only takes a couple of hours to get the tank spotless.



Basically, you fill your tank with white vinegar and water (maybe a little salt) you add a steel rod to the tank hook it up to a MANUAL battery charger and you essentially elctroplate your steel rod with the rust in your tank.

The Steel rod must be taped so that bare metal doesn't touch the tank anywhere I used a piece of rebar taped where needed with electrical tape. I would imagine stainless would work even better. You fill the tank with a water/vinegar solution (60/40 should do) then hook up a MANUAL battery charger at somewhere between 6 and 12 amps, negative to the steel rod and positive to the tank( iused the tank mount bracket). let that cook for a while, an hour to two plus depending on how bad your tank is and your amperage, It is best to do it a slower (less amperage pace) DO THIS OUTSIDE OR IN A WELL VENTILLATED AREA as this process creates a toxic gas. You will see it frothing and bubbling etc. after a while dump out the solution (its just vinegar and salt) and check it. repeat as needed. If your tank is deeply pitted you probably won't get rid of all the rust but you probably will make the tank usefull again.

I have done this several times and have been amazed at the results!
 

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Positive on the tank and negative on the rod? This should end up with the "plating" on the tank instead of on the rod but what the heck. If it works it works!
 

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I know, right? When I read this I went back and read what I took my info from and sure enough that's what it said. Thats the way I remembered doing it as well. What the info I read said was, and I paraphrase :), "the positively charged particles on the tank are attracted to the negatively charged rod." Now I was drunk and stoned all through high school so I don't know for sure about any of this, just doin' what the internet says :shock:

I'll see if I can find the original copy of what I took it from and post it here, but what I do know is that in a couple of hours time I have nice shiny tanks!! :D
 

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Sounds reasonable, when I get back to my project I've got just the tank to try it on.

My thinking was based on the idea that in the electrical world electrons flow from the negatively charged article to the positively charged article. This may not have a darn thing to do with getting rust off a tank.

God I love this site!
 

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Direction of electron flow depends on if you view it based on Standard Theory, or Edison Theory.... They are opposite points of view.....Both are useful.....Use the one that makes it easiest for you to "relate" to the transfers of energy....
 

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66Sprint said:
Direction of electron flow depends on if you view it based on Standard Theory, or Edison Theory.... They are opposite points of view.....Both are useful.....Use the one that makes it easiest for you to "relate" to the transfers of energy....
Okay dude, you just blew my mind! :eek:

All kidding aside, I'm going to try it the other way around and see what difference it makes. I've got a Suzuki GS450 tank that needs cleaning. I'll do an experiment and report back.
 

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RicH2 said:
Rince your tank out with hot water then fill to the top. For a 4 to 5 gal tank add a cup of Arm and Hammer Super Washing Soda, NOT baking soda. Use an electrode, like a welding rod through a rubber plug to stop up the fill hole. Connect rod to a 12 volt battery charger; positive to the electrode and negative to the tank body. Be patient, it will take 5 or more days. Repeat if not completely clean.

Keep your tank from rusting by keeping fuel in it.

And, I am one who would not recommend POR-15 or any other liner. When you have the experience of it peeling off, and it will, you'll understand why. Just keep fuel in your bike !

This info comes in part from the boys over at http://www.kawasakitriplesworldwide.com
Hey what's wrong with POR-15 :( I use it extensively and have never had a fail, on the other hand "cream" is not the best and is prone to peeling.

Rod from OZ :cool:
 

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otr002 said:
Hey what's wrong with POR-15 :( I use it extensively and have never had a fail, on the other hand "cream" is not the best and is prone to peeling.

Rod from OZ :cool:
I've had good success with POR-15 as well. Although, I've only had it in my tank for two years. Not sure how it fairs long term.
 

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At least this thread isn't as dangerous as the last tank cleaning thread I saw. The petcock of most old Honda's has an aluminum body and a brass tube too. If you use electro-chemisty or acid-base or just put nuts and bolts in there and shake--remove the petcock first. If toasting out the last of oem plating is cool by you then these kind of steps are not so bad once the petcock is out. If not one can #1 bend the brass tube,#2 toast away all or part of said tube, #3 toast away the aluminum body of the petcock, #4 have something go kaboom-those gas bubbles are hydogen gas and your playing with something that could make sparks. The chemist in me as well as the vintage motorcycle guy would tell anyone--remove the petcock and plug the hole with a wood or plastic plate, if you need to make up some sort of seal or gasket then do so. Shake with nuts and bolts or chain and flush out so you get rid of all the easy to remove stuff --plus it reduceses the load on the chemicals. Then use Evaporust--- e vapo rust---because it kelates the ions as they form it uses only a low amount of phosphoric acid-may take a day or so. Then do a post shake out with nuts,bolts ,chain or what-ever only this time don't rinse with water.( I like acetone or MEK removes organics and water) If I'm coating ready to rock-otherwise then kerosine or mineral spirits to stop rust untill gas goes in, or coat. Now one can put the petcock back in.
As for Por-15, it was not developed for gas tank repair but has been recomended for everything from as a kind of fiberglass resin for floor board repair to gas tank seal. It has re-actions with water and one day I would not be suprised when it's recomended for diper rash. Just clean, dry, and paint the baby's ass with Por-15, let dry, and diper.
 

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You talkin bout my mention of nitro methane?? :?: Like anyone would have that laying around anyway, or actually took me seriously.. I have used it before and it is good as a final flush (if you've got some laying about & you're wanting to get rid of it), and prevents rust because of the oil content. Like I had mentioned, it's RC nitromethane. 20% Also, anyone who cleans a tank pretty much knows to remove the petcock. If they don't then they usually ask questions here about it, and they get told to. This topic has been covered here on Hondatwins a gazillion times, on other sites frequented by many of us a gazillion times, and the entire internet a gazillion times.. Most of it is old news and has been covered before. A simple Google search will help most anyone on this topic anymore....

It's just not rocket science my friend... It doesn't take a degree in chemistry or a training class from OSHA to clean a rusty fuel tank, but we're glad to have you here with yours.. Please don't take THAT the wrong way...

My 2....



GB :mrgreen:
 
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