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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Winter project this year is to replace front brake pads/shoes on my 78 CB400a. At the same time, I'd like to replace the wheel bearings as I sometimes get a hint of disconcerting wobble. Could be my imagination (seems to happen in the same spots--maybe it's the road surface), but with an older bike I'd rather just replace them than wait to be sure.

I see some bearing kits on ebay, but I'd like to know if anyone here has a suggestion for a decent set. Seems like something not terribly expensive even if I pay up for the non-discount Chinese version. Brakes seem fairly straight-forward, but if anyone has a preference there, I'd be interested as well.

Apologies if I've missed it in my search, but if there's anything I need to know about getting the old bearings out and preserving anything, I'd definitely appreciate the advice.

Thanks!
 

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Moved to SOHC Wheel section
The front wheel bearings are standard bearing number 6302Z which can be sourced from any local bearing supply house. I would avoid eBay for bearing as you're likely to get real cheap Chinese ones. Bearing houses only sell decent quality parts and they're typically cheaper than anywhere else.
There is a seal on the right side that can usually be reused but it's still available from Honda 91252-230-003, size 26 x 42 x 7 mm
There's a spacer collar inside the wheel that pushes to one side so you can use a drift/punch to drive one bearing out.
 

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The disconcerting wobble is likely to be the steering head ball bearings, possibly just needing a good clean and grease or maybe replacing one or more balls.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Jim... I will look into this. If any of them are damaged, do you have any thoughts on replacing the steering stem bearing balls with roller bearings? They seem like they'd be a little easier to manage, although if it fails I guess the whole set needs to be replaced.
 

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I like the tapered rollers and the original ball bearings. The tapers add a bit of resistance to the steering which is not bad. I've got tapers in the road bike, balls in the CB400T1 and tapers will be going into the CL350.
Maintenance wise the balls should be greased twice as often as the tapers, balls are @10K mile intervals
 

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When you pick up your brgs you might ask if they rent or loan internal brg pullers . They make pulling a bearing easy.


Bill
 

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I went down the wheel bearing rabbit hole.....help!

I don't have a local bearing house so will have to order online. I understand that the "z" means metal shield on one side only. You can get zz, rs, 2rs. Thats for double metal shield, single rubber and double rubber seals. Are rubber sealed bearings better or worse for this application?
In regards to specs such as clearance ratings... I see alot of bearings with "C3" clearance which is "greater than standard". "CO" is the "standard clearance" on the chart. Should I be looking for "CO" bearings in this regard?
ABEC ratings typically seem to be 1 or 3. Should I be specifying one or the other?
To bad Honda doesn't make these anymore would have just gotten OEM!
 

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I picked up my bearings from 4into1, I think. Their kits are cheap enough. Regardless of the supplier, all the kits probably use bearings from the same small pool of manufacturers.

On my CM400E, the stock bearings were either no seal or sealed one side. The replacements were sealed both sides. They were 6302. The resistance to turning was slightly greater than the good stock bearing, but once on the bike, I haven't noticed a problem. It could be that the older bearings were worn a bit. Note that on one of my nicer bicycles, the stock bearing is a 2RS, and humans can only output a sustained fraction of a horsepower. If the bicycle world thinks sealed bearings don't have enough resistance to matter, I doubt your motorcycle even notices.
 

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I have replaced open bearings with sealed bearings on most of my bikes with no issues so far. The bearings from 4 into 1 have worked well, as have the All Balls kits that I have used.
 

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I would imagine a seal on either side would be better than none, or one side only, and I think that the rubber "rs" seals may do a better job than the zz type?
I'm more concerned with the ABEC and "C" type rating specifications I should be ordering
 

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I have replaced open bearings with sealed bearings on most of my bikes with no issues so far. The bearings from 4 into 1 have worked well, as have the All Balls kits that I have used.
+1 on using 4into1. They have bearing kits for both wheels that come with the seals for less than $10 each. I have used their bearings on 350’s and a 450 so far. Will do it again in the future. Plus you can order any other bits from them while you are at it. They ship quick.
 

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I have also used 4into1 numerous times in the past. Great company with fast shipping, reasonable prices/shipping.
I'll contact them and see where they source their bearings from. My bike only has 7k miles on it. bearings seem smooth, but have the wheel off for tire change and brake service etc. When I spin the wheel on the axle it seems smooth but when i rotate the bearings by hand (while still installed in wheel) I can feel a little bumpiness. Although doing it this way puts more of a side load on them. I just figure might as well swap them out while i'm in there. Definitely looking for quality equivalent to OEM or better!
 

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I agree with swapping them out even on a low mileage vintage bike. It's really the only way to know just how old your wheel bearings are.
 

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I would imagine a seal on either side would be better than none, or one side only, and I think that the rubber "rs" seals may do a better job than the zz type?
I'm more concerned with the ABEC and "C" type rating specifications I should be ordering
The extra clearance option in ball bearings is for applications where the bearing is a pressed-on fit to the shaft and/or the mounting hole. A press-fit installation will reduce the clearance between the ball races so the bearing is built with more clearance to suit. The standard clearance factor is just right for wheel bearings since the outer race is a very light press fit(almost none) and the inner race is a slip fit on the axle.
The rubber seals are best, they keep the grease in and water out, you can re-use the original rubber seals since they are only needed for a dirt shield.
 
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Although I purchased the Koyo bearings in the Ebay ad I listed earlier, I did find this listing for Koyo bearings online later. They even list the bearing as a replacement for several motorcycle manufaturers with OEM part numbers.
https://www.thebigbearingstore.com/koyo-6302-2rsc3-radial-ball-bearing-15x42x13/
The bearings in my front wheel were also KOYO, i assume they are the originals. Since I wasn't careful and bent the dust covers on both sides, I ordered both. The one LDR listed earlier and the rotor side is #91258-410-013 40X50X5 mm
BTW, I read somewhere that the inner spacer between the bearings had enough clearance side to side to get a tool on the backside of bearing to punch out. Not so on mine, its tight. If you rotate one bearing it spins the collar and other bearing too due to the pressure.
 

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Oh, wow would you look at that! I'll be picking up one of those anchors tomorrow thanks for the link!
 

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Get the double seal type.

read up on bearing removal and reffiting. Yes the raw plug idea, sometime you have to resort to welding/tacking the balls to the inner and outer races and the drift out that way. or tack a "disc" and drift against that!!

research rear wheel bearing removal also, check the exploded views as some have a welded on "DAM or weir" on the wheel internal spacer meaning that comes out one way only.

Research on refitting and tools needed.

Be very careful when refitting the front wheel not to damage the speedo "dog plate".

Steering head bearings, the races become "indented" and the movement becomes "notch" resulting in weaving down the road.

Research on them and their replacement/refitting.

Does your steering lock arrangement use the head stock mounted lock to engage in a hole in the bottom yoke steering tube ??

If so, you now have the means to make steering race re grease a 10 second job, have a think about that one......a simple machining and drilling and tapping process with a lathe, and a simple fitting job.

It is also reverse able, no frame component modification at all, mearly an "addition".
 

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Well I tried the concrete bolt idea. Didn't work, just slipped out when I hit it with a hammer. It was 1/2" size, next size up was 5/8 and too big. But 9/16" if available would have been the ticket. I did notice the inner spacer had fallen just enough to allow a punch nudge up against the outer race so I got it out that way no big deal. Appreciate the tips on on steering bearings and rear wheel bearings etc. will make note of that when I get to those. Will have to check how my steering lock is set up.
 
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