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Discussion Starter #1
I need to replace the front brake shoes on my CL350. I see plenty listed on flea bay but wondered which brand to go with. I see some NOS Honda shoes and some EBC shoes mostly. Considering that Honda has changed part numbers along the way, and considering that EBC is aftermarket, which shoes have any of you guys had good luck with? I have read that some shoes are too wide and cause rubbing on the backing plate, and that some have the wrong radius. Any suggestions? Part numbers? Thanks.
 

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NEW - Aftermarket is the way to go.
NOS could be a really bad deal.
The biggest problem with these brake shoes is NOT them wearing out but the GLUE that holds the braking material to the metal shoe aging and coming loose.
I have opened up (3) different set of brake and found at least one of the brake pads loose.
If they come loose while braking it will make for a really bad day.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Yendor, just saw your reply. I did end up getting some new EBC front brake shoes. They seem okay but certainly not Japanese quality. The pivot ends had to be sanded and smoothed since EBC doesn't even dress them after die casting - they leave the draft angle at the casting parting line so the shoes rock in their pivots. So I took care of that. Then I adjusted the twin leading link so that I have a perfect parallelogram in the linkage. Then chalked the shoes and installed into the hub. Cinched the brake tightly and tightened the axle nut. Activated the brake and spun the wheel with the brake dragging. Pulled it apart and could see that only one shoe was touching. Took the shoes off and laid them one on top of the other on a granite surface plate. I used some vee blocks to butt the ends of the stacked shoes against so I could compare the thickness of the lining material. You could see without measuring that one lining was way thicker than the other. Measured out at about 0.025 inches difference. So I sanded off about that much on the thicker one and refitted the whole thing. Took it back and forth apart about 200 times sanding the final little high spots to get them both even. Now everything works great. Unfortunately they seem to be the only company supplying new shoes now, so I guess I'm lucky just to get them. If a guy slaps these in without fiddle fussing a lot, I don't think he will ever have good brakes. Just way too poorly manufactured to ever bed in just by riding. Oh by the way, I did take my originals which look to be 1969 original, and whacked the linings from the side pretty good to see if they were loose from the metal. I could not knock them off as hard as I could whack. So if need be, I might be tempted to de-glaze them and use them in the future. Thanks for the info.
 

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Another way to arc shoes is to glue sandpaper strips in the drum with rubber cement to arc the shoes Assemble the wheel and apply the brake when turning it, peel the sandpaper/glue out when finished. If you have access to a lathe you can chuck up the backing plate assembly and cut the lining to get it even.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The problem with gluing sandpaper to the drum is that the final radius of the shoe will be about 0.020 of an inch less than the drum because of the thickness of the sandpaper and glue. Then the shoe will only contact in the middle, so you still have to break it in a long time. The lathe is probably the best approach but I didn't have access to one this time around.
 
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