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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I try to turn out one or two projects yearly, sometimes to make a profit on resale, but I must really emphasize the sometimes. The last two have been Yamaha 650's, great bikes, fun to work on, and pretty well bullet proof engines. I found this 1976 Honda CB500 on Letgo, and since it was close, had a clear title, the price was right, and owner was moving, yep, it went on the trailer. Of course it is "bobbed" but I must say I have seen worst workmanship in the past. Of course it has been sitting outside for years, (at least it was covered with a plastic tarp.) The wiring must have been done with some influence of alcohol, but so far I have lights, horn occasionally, a part time starter, fire to the plugs, and even turn signals. The gas was awful and the carbs are on the bench, but honestly they look like they have been rebuilt sometime recently. I am going to have to do some research here to see if there is any great differences between the 450 and 500 twins since all of my repair manuals are for the 450. The compression seems decent and it still is running a Honda speedo showing around 6K which the seller believes is the actual mileage, we will see about that one. I did locate a big arse nest of black widow spiders living under the gas tank this afternoon,(the last Honda I did had a small copperhead in the battery box.) Nothing like these old twins to provide a little extra excitement, not a good thing for this old 69 year ticker. Wish me luck guys, I will looking for tips and help...........
 

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i dont know why but it seems like every time someone is sitting around with a can of paint and something in front of them they feel the need to paint it... must be why there are so many bikes out there with red frames. I know a guy who painted the frame on his cb brown. :confused:

anyways, I actually think it's a cool looking bike despite the green. I've always liked the look of bobbers.
 

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...I've always liked the look of bobbers.
But this one looks like pain to ride to me. Swing arm rear suspension was one of the huge advances in motorcycling.
 

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I have ridden bicycles with no suspension, but those you have your weight on your feet and you can offer yourself some cushion. this looks like all your weight would be on your butt with no option to stand or brace yourself. so yeah I can see how it'd be a rough ride.
 

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Your butt would be the last concern I think when riding a hardtail. I rode one once and after only just 10 miles or so, I thought my back was going to give out.
You feel every little bump and pebble on the road through your spine. Oh yeah making a turn at speed is really exciting too when the rear wheel would hop.
 

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exactly - hard to believe that there were so many hardtails ridden for so long before even the plunger boxes came around. lots of bad backs out there, I'll bet. not going to compromise function for form in that area
 

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Paint the white parts yellow and slap a John Deere sticker on it:D
 
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Before rear suspension touring bikes had a sprung seat. The seat was sprung on a shock absorbing center post and rear springs. Harley carried this through into the 70s even when the had rear suspension. Kidney Belts were used to reduce back damage.
 

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The plunger box was a bad idea conceived IMO. True it does provide some minimal suspension to the rear but doing so at taking away the only strength of a rigid frame by making it not rigid anymore (allowing flexing)
It also allows the rear wheel to wobble and twist sideways.
 

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The plunger box was a bad idea conceived IMO. True it does provide some minimal suspension to the rear but doing so at taking away the only strength of a rigid frame by making it not rigid anymore (allowing flexing)
It also allows the rear wheel to wobble and twist sideways.
yeah, it might have felt like an advance then, but I sure wasn't implying that it was good! when I started at the Police garage in Tampa in '76, they had the old FLHs with sprung seats, then when they bought the first Evo version later, it had one too - still, in the '80s, but likely just for the cops version, and they all had swingarm rear suspension by that point (I would say obviously they all had it, but when it comes to advancements and H-D...)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Gentlemen, if I can get it up and running enough for a test drive that will be enough for me. It is certainly not a machine you head to Bike Week on with a thousand miles ahead of you. I did have an old hardtail Triumph Bonneville Chopper with an extended front end for a number of years. I brought it back from the dead and held onto it for nostalgia more than anything else. It was ok for a quick run to the hardware store provided you a had 40 acre parking lot to around in. Of course I am having a devil of a time freeing the valve adjusting lock nuts, they have been having a good soak with PB Blaster for about 24 hours now. I had forgotten how much of a PITA valve adjustment is on these twins. I just competed winter maintenance on my Moto Guzzi and if I had a pet monkey he could have adjusted the valves for me. With the big Holiday approaching free time is becoming scarce but I would like to try it at least get fired up in the next week or so.....
 

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I used Seafoam Deep Creep on those adjuster nuts. Just heat them up with a torch and then sprayed some on there and let it soaks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I used Seafoam Deep Creep on those adjuster nuts. Just heat them up with a torch and then sprayed some on there and let it soaks.
I walked away tonight and still my nuts are tight. Sorry, but that is true. A couple of bouts with heat and PB Blaster and still no luck after a 24 hour soak. I hit them with heat one more time and the PB before calling it a night. I have adjusted the valves using the lock nuts (.002 feeler and all were extremely loose). I am on the fence about what the next course of action will be. Some thoughts open for discussion are:

1. Drill a pilot hole in the outside lock nut and hope the Blaster will penetrate further into the threads..
2. Adjust them one more time using the lock nuts only and secure them with a dab of JB Well and say to hell with it. (I am thinking the JB Weld could easily be chiseled off for the next adjustment.
3. Try them again in the morning, very gently with light blows using a hammer impact driver with the Wife holding a 14mm box end on the nut. I know this result in at least a good domestic dispute.
4. Final and most drastic, dremel the outside lock nut off hopefully without damaging the threads of the actual adjuster screw and buy new ones at True Value.

Now I am going to have a couple of beers to drown my troubles and start soaking a country ham for the big Holiday.....
 

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I wouldn't do any of that to be honest.
I would just use a better penetrant than PB Blaster which isn't all that great to begin with. Try Kroil or mix your own using 50/50 ATF and acetone mix.

I would not try to adjust the valves with the lock nut stuck like that.
 
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