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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Something like this may have been posted before, I don't know. Tonight I had to shorten the drive chain so I thought I'd document it. The same process (and tool) is used when breaking the cam chain.

Today I received a new JT, 33t, sprocket that I ordered from my llocal Suzuki dealer for my T500. Here are some pictures showing the simple process.

The first thing I do is mark the pin I'm going to remove. Once, in the past, I looked at the link to be removed then turned around to grab a tool and came back to remove the link. In my haste, I ground off the wrong pin so now I always mark the link to be removed. In this case, I only needed to remove one full link.



Next take the grinder or dremel tool of your choice and grind the pin flush with the link plate.



Here is the chain breaking tool that I use. It's a Motion Pro tool and is great for removing the links and also for riveting the new pins if it's a pressed master link. In this case, my chain is a non-O ring type 520 chain and uses a master link so I didn't get any pictures of the "press plate" in action. You'll notice that one of the drive pins is broken. This is not due to any poor quality but quite the oposite, not using the tool properly. When I first got the tool someone told me you could press the pin out without grinding the pin flush. Well, maybe you can and maybe you can't. In my case I couldn't because it broke the drive pin. I haven't tried to order a replacement since I can still get the pin out with what I have.



Here is the tool in action. Out of the picture, I use a ratchet (or the supplied rod) to press the pin out.



Here is the pin pushed about 80% of the way out. If the drive pin wasn't broken it would have come out all the way. In this case I use a pair of pliesr and pull it off.



The single link in all it's glory waiting for the trash can. That's all there is to it.

 

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Sensei
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(Strictly for terminology clarification purposes), to me that piece would be two links...one inner, and one outer (number of involved pins or holes minus one equals number of links in the length of chain).....Even with that "rule", there is such a thing as a "half-link" (half inner, half outer).....The typical master (or joining link) would be one outer link....
 

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I'd grind both pins flush, then pop the side plate off
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
66Sprint said:
(Strictly for terminology clarification purposes), to me that piece would be two links...one inner, and one outer (number of involved pins or holes minus one equals number of links in the length of chain).....Even with that "rule", there is such a thing as a "half-link" (half inner, half outer).....The typical master (or joining link) would be one outer link....
Yes, I guess in looking at it again I'd call it two links as well. I call each side plate one link and there are two there. Thanks for the clarification.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
jayel said:
I'd grind both pins flush, then pop the side plate off
If it was a riveted master link I had to break, then I would have ground both pins flush as well. Since it's a clip type master it's only necessary to remove one pin at the end of the chain to shorten it.
 

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I have a chain breaker, nice tool.
I also have an 18 volt DeWalt die grinder, a hammer and a chisel I use for removing links on chains.
I just can't use my Dremel :? , it is too small and tedious a tool for me to deal with, so I use finesse when using my DeWalt. :twisted:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
fasterspider said:
I have a chain breaker, nice tool.
I also have an 18 volt DeWalt die grinder, a hammer and a chisel I use for removing links on chains.
I just can't use my Dremel :? , it is too small and tedious a tool for me to deal with, so I use finesse when using my DeWalt. :twisted:
The die grinder works great too. I will use that if its sitting handy. Twice the work in half the time. Just don't let it get away from you :)
 
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