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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the engine side covers removed for polishing. I'd like to clean out the sludge that is in the lower case as much as possible. The engine is out of the frame. My plan is to prop up the engine and place a pan under it. Remove the drain plug and spray in somthing to cut the crud down so it can drain out. I figure some carb cleaner should work. Anyone have a method they have used.
 

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I have done a bit of a clean out with kerosene by putting half a pint into the engine with the plug in place and shaking the engine to move the kerosene around in the sump and after several minutes and much shaking drain it out. (don't crank the engine with the kero in there you don't want it in the workings!) The kero comes out dirty but I am sure that it only removes a small amount of gunk.
I would stay clear of anything more potent than kerosene and I am a little doubtful about the engine flushing compounds available which might be another way to go.
 

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Hi,

Maybe splitting the cases, and clean the lower casing will work ?

Jensen
 

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scout4924 said:
I have the engine side covers removed for polishing. I'd like to clean out the sludge that is in the lower case as much as possible. The engine is out of the frame. My plan is to prop up the engine and place a pan under it. Remove the drain plug and spray in somthing to cut the crud down so it can drain out. I figure some carb cleaner should work. Anyone have a method they have used.
Kero is the way to go as the Roo stated. Once the engine is back together you can use an engine flush, which is a high detergent oil that is run through the engine for around ten minutes and then flushed out and replaced with oil. I use this process on all running bikes i buy and as the flush is reusable (up to 4 times) it works out quite reasonable. I paid $50 for 5 lt in Oz for an Oz brand and it works well.
 

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Thanks for the vote of confidence Scout!
Jensen is right, the very best is to split the cases and do the job, but I understood that the engine was still in the bike?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes pulling the cases apart would allow the greatest access to the sump. My objective is to avoid splitting the cases. (If it ain't broke don't fix it) I'll flush it and let you know if or when it blows-up.
 

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Hi,

If you really want to flush it to avoid splitting the cases, you could pump fluid around while filtering it.
I use an old pump with an petrol filter in the line and a nozzle to get a pressurized flow.

For this job I once coupled an oil pump to an DC motor, to pump around the fluid.
I tried different fluids, but the results where not what I expected (hoped for).

Later, when the high detergent synthetic oils came, it wasn't necessary anymore and I do this if I won't open the cases :

Step 1 : flush with kerosene or petrol (don't start the engine)
Step 2 : Put oil in the engine, warm up the engine (a short ride will do) and drain the oil.
step 3 : clean the oil filter (if centrifugal) or replace (paper filter).
step 4 : fill it up with highly detergent full synthetic oil and ride the bike for 300 miles, and in case of a centrifugal filter try to avoid low revs, because the detergent oil WILL clean your centrifugal filter)
step 5 : clean the oil filter (centrifugal) after the first 50 miles, and if the filter is really dirty, do it again after 50 miles, otherwise after 100 miles again.
step 6 : flush the oil, put new oil in and clean the filter again. If the filter stays clean after 100 miles, it's ok, if not, repeat as long as necessary.

Be carefull and check what's in your filter because in the sludge there are metal parts from the engine, and these parts WILL grind you engine if they are gonna be freed again after all those years. Since the oil pump is located before the filter, it is worth replacing the oil pump after this.

After a few 1000 miles the engine will be clean. Expensive ?, yes, oil is expensive, but it works.

If possible, I split the cases, because the junk in the sludge is not nice to have in your pump and saves you money in the end.

Jensen
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Now I'm thinking of just setting it engine in the parts washer ans running cleaner through it and let the solvent run out the drain plug and feed hole on the left side and back out the right side. With the covers off I should be able to keep it below the crank. I can "prime the oil pump with fresh oil before closing up the engine.

Well, first things first! Time to hit the shop! I need a "roller" first! I'll be cleaning up the frame.
 

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+1 for Kerosene, pretty sure that's what the book recommends for the clutch etc., If you do separate the cases I've had great results with non-chlorinated brake parts cleaner for hard to reach nooks and crannies but I've only used it on the gutted cases. I think the freezing temps of the brake cleaner helps.

I really like the idea of circulating oil through the motor with a pump, hook it up to the oil galley at the side cover and let it wash the motor from inside out. Got any pump recommendations?

Here's a glimpse of a 71 CL450 I'm working on resurrecting now that has the worst case of engine snot I've ever seen. That white stuff all over the clutch is reminiscent of the crud that accumulates on battery terminals. 1700 miles, motor sat with spark plug holes open for 11 years. The smell..., it smells so bad inside that motor :lol:

 
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