Honda Twins banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,
I have been restoring a CB200 and have reached the stage of what to do with the barrels & head. Normally I just get them Vapour Blasted and leave it at that but I have never really been happy with the finish. Has any one tried some of these Very High Temperature Aluminium spray paints. I'm trying to get as close to the colour and finish as when the bike was new. There seem to be a lot of different makes on the market all of which claim to be the best.
Any advice or suggestions on which to use will be greatly appreciated.
Many Regards,
Glyn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
I’ve used Simoniz engine enamel before which goes on well and looks ok if a little bright; but dulls down once heated. I used the Matt enamel, which comes in 500ml rattle cans and is enough for the whole engine, properly mask all the holes and joint faces before spraying. It’s not very scratch resistant until it’s dried for a day or so, but didn’t chip off when I put the engine back in the frame.,
HTH.
Nigel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Nigel,
Did you use the engine enamel on the head and barrels or just the casings.
Regards,
Glyn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
I have a good method with rattle can ... you can see in my signature.

Few tips... run a dehumidifer in the space. I aim for 80f. And 30% r.h.

The cans need to be hot ... get a large stock pot and put super hit water in. Aim to spray the cans at 105 degrees... i use a laser thermometer i got for ten bucks.

Then ... heat cycle as it dries! Ideally an hour at 100, and hour at 150, and hour at 200.

If you do this the finish will be spectacular... and will last very well.

I use a ceramic coat.

Make sure your paint is designed for engines not mufflers. Muffler/grill paint will hold heat in. You want a ceramic cost designed to dissipate heat.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi Nigel,
WOW! that finish is just what I'm looking for so Simoniz Engine Enamel it is.
Thanks for the help,
Regards,
Glyn.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,002 Posts
Personally, I'd vote for leaving the head and cylinders in bare alloy, also the centre crank cases, assuming that they are not horribly pitted with corrosion. That's the way they came from the factory, after all.

I once saw a 400/4 at a local show, entire engine had been painted silver. I thought that it looked awful, but that is of course just my opinion.

I've used the Simoniz silver on engine cases, then baked them in the domestic oven to cure and harden them. I wasn't keen on the results, looked too bright, so I've reverted to silver Hammerite, as recommended to me by another on here. Surprisingly, the Hammerite stands up well as case paint ( not the head and cyinders ) and matches the original paint well.

My CB200 engine. Cases were badly corroded, so I did paint the centre cases and cylinders with Simoniz enamel. Head left in bare alloy. Outer cases painted using Halfords steel wheel paint. Bad idea - it washes straight off with petrol.

DSCF2445.jpg

One of my CB175 engines, bare alloy, with Hammerite on the cases. Looks much nicer, IMHO

DSCF2692.jpg

No vapour blasting here, just elbow grease ....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
Couple of comparisons both with Simoniz; a CL450; and CB360.
AD46C34E-5A98-402D-9096-AA4C095DB1BE.jpg
BD2AC94A-1651-483D-8CD3-FFD8B4904673.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: Glyn and workdogz2

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Personally, I'd vote for leaving the head and cylinders in bare alloy, also the centre crank cases, assuming that they are not horribly pitted with corrosion. That's the way they came from the factory, after all.

I once saw a 400/4 at a local show, entire engine had been painted silver. I thought that it looked awful, but that is of course just my opinion.

I've used the Simoniz silver on engine cases, then baked them in the domestic oven to cure and harden them. I wasn't keen on the results, looked too bright, so I've reverted to silver Hammerite, as recommended to me by another on here. Surprisingly, the Hammerite stands up well as case paint ( not the head and cyinders ) and matches the original paint well.

My CB200 engine. Cases were badly corroded, so I did paint the centre cases and cylinders with Simoniz enamel. Head left in bare alloy. Outer cases painted using Halfords steel wheel paint. Bad idea - it washes straight off with petrol.

View attachment 238978

One of my CB175 engines, bare alloy, with Hammerite on the cases. Looks much nicer, IMHO

View attachment 238986

No vapour blasting here, just elbow grease ....
Hi Richard,
I agree that the Simoniz Silver may be a bit on the bright side but I am considering using Simoniz Matt Aluminium enamel which may be a little closer to bare metal colour and finish. I suppose only experimenting will give me the right results.
Regards,
Glyn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,364 Posts
Has anyone sent parts to "Jet Hot" to have their "ceramic coating" applied to motor parts as apposed to just headers or exhaust manifolds?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,537 Posts
I don't think you have Dupli Color Engine Enamel in the UK. I used the Cast Aluminum color on the center cases, cylinder and head. The cam bearing blocks and side covers had the scrapes blended, then polished and followed up with clear Lacquer. The Dupli Color was primed and top coated with the color. The cases were ultrasonically cleaned before painting and I made sure there was a water break free surface before application. The head and cylinder was media blasted by the machinist. I know you guys in the UK are very particular about originality. My memory of the 450 DOHC and 305 back in the day the cylinders and jugs were not painted from the factory and after a couple of years they oxidized and really didn't look very good. After two seasons the engine still looks good.

Jim's CB450 Engine.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
Thanks James for sharing your experience we didn’t get the 450’s at least the CL variants; and we do have a far more aggressive climate in the UK; when we spread salt on the roads in winter; I can remember back in the day taking off the clutch cover on my 250 Superdream, polishing the corrosion out and spray painting the cover with Holts “ Steel Wheels” a paint meant for steel wheels but which is actually very close to the Aluminium originals. I also applied Halfords clear Laquer and it was good for the next few years before a car driver decided that they were parked on the wrong side of the road and went for them. I had a Superdream and an BMW R80 Parked on the road and she got both of them. I’m still riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
A couple questions about painting my engine. I'm looking at VHT and wondering whether to use the VHT Engine Enamel or the VHT stuff developed specifically for motorcycle engines? VHT Very High Temperature Flameproof Automotive Paint

Can I paint the jugs and head with this? As in is it durable enough wo withstand those temperatures and will it also allow the heat to dissipate correctly?

I'm vapor blasting my engine. Is that enough or do I have to sand it down before priming/painting?

Do you prime first?

Do you clear coat over the paint?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
Mike -

You might have better luck starting a new thread than replying to 3 separate ones with nearly identical questions :D though I applaud your enthusiasm!

Anyway - you can skip the flameproof for engines. If it passes 600 degrees on the outside of the engine, you’ve got bigger problems than paint. I’ve had good luck with the VHT engine enamel. Vapor blasting should leave you with a “peened” surface, so lightly textured already. I would prime with a color similar to the one you’ll be painting over it with. Clear isn’t completely necessary, but can protect the finish. Big secret seems to be, set yourself up with a makeshift paint booth to keep the dust off, and then throw your paint cans in warm water for an hour or so before painting to get the paint up to temperature. Anything below 70 is dicey for spray paint, in the paint itself, the surface, or the ambient temperature where you leave it to cure. Follow the instructions on the can, and many light coats are better than few heavy ones. After you paint them, I throw the pieces in the oven at 200 for an hour to cure it to chemical resistance, as you’ll probably get gas on it at some point (I hope! Means you’re making progress :D)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Mike -

You might have better luck starting a new thread than replying to 3 separate ones with nearly identical questions :D though I applaud your enthusiasm!

Anyway - you can skip the flameproof for engines. If it passes 600 degrees on the outside of the engine, you’ve got bigger problems than paint. I’ve had good luck with the VHT engine enamel. Vapor blasting should leave you with a “peened” surface, so lightly textured already. I would prime with a color similar to the one you’ll be painting over it with. Clear isn’t completely necessary, but can protect the finish. Big secret seems to be, set yourself up with a makeshift paint booth to keep the dust off, and then throw your paint cans in warm water for an hour or so before painting to get the paint up to temperature. Anything below 70 is dicey for spray paint, in the paint itself, the surface, or the ambient temperature where you leave it to cure. Follow the instructions on the can, and many light coats are better than few heavy ones. After you paint them, I throw the pieces in the oven at 200 for an hour to cure it to chemical resistance, as you’ll probably get gas on it at some point (I hope! Means you’re making progress :D)
Sorry! I’m relatively new here and have been on forums (899 Panigale cough cough) where you get flamed for starting a new thread on a topic that has existing threads. So I used a “shotgun effect” on old threads in hopes of being answered. Duly noted to just start a new thread next time

I’ve read on another site that primer isn’t necessary for anything but sheet metal and increases the thickness of the paint coat which reduces heat transfer. Is there truth to that? I plan to paint the whole engine (jugs and head included) matte or satin black. Also have you had experiences with clear “yellowing”?

Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
One more thing! Would you paint pieces separately or assemble engine with no internals and paint it as a whole?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
No worries! Wasn't trying to be mean about it, just trying to get you more replies ;) a lot of the guys have a pretty encyclopedic knowledge of particular models of bikes and the best posts for some of the more common issues (or they cheat and bookmark em and just let me believe that), so sometimes you'll just get a link to the other post as a reply to keep things succinct.

Anyway - others can chime in, but the extra few microns of thickness have never been enough for me to worry about. A brain trust of much more informed opinions runs through it in detail here: http://www.hondatwins.net/forums/60...clearcoat-engine-painting-heat-retention.html

From personal experience, my engine is done up in VHT engine aluminum on the valve cover, head, and cases and VHT engine gloss black cylinders, and no clear. The clear would have kept me from chipping a couple of things when reinstalling, but I'll touch them up eventually (right now it's all hidden behind scrambler pipes :D ); the conclusion on that other thread seems to be that a very high quality clear applied to a very clean surface shouldn't yellow (YMMV depending on where you store it, of course). That said, a lot of it comes down to what kind of fining you're shooting for - a no-clear finish might not polish to quite a shine, but it'll be easier to touch up any scratches or dings for a daily rider. If you're going for a Concours finish, well... ask a professional for his very expensive assistance :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
If you've already got it apart, definitely paint it separately. It'll keep you from having to mask all your bolt heads (and you don't want to paint your bolts - to some it gives the appearance of "not caring enough to do proper masking"). You can tape and mask all of your gasket surfaces and holds separate with the engine apart too.

If you have a working engine, I wouldn't disassemble it for painting alone - you can mask around it too. But if it's already taken apart, you'll find it a lot easier to paint in pieces I think.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,838 Posts
If you've already got it apart, definitely paint it separately. It'll keep you from having to mask all your bolt heads (and you don't want to paint your bolts - to some it gives the appearance of "not caring enough to do proper masking"). You can tape and mask all of your gasket surfaces and holds separate with the engine apart too.

If you have a working engine, I wouldn't disassemble it for painting alone - you can mask around it too. But if it's already taken apart, you'll find it a lot easier to paint in pieces I think.
If you plan on upgrading to stainless steel hardware, you can paint over the old hardware and then install the new stuff.
 
  • Like
Reactions: spirograph

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Thanks! I am replacing all the hardware, but I have the engine apart so I'll paint piece-by-piece. I plan on polishing the cooling fins after painting. What precautions should I take to prevent oxidation after removing the paint and several layers of aluminum on the fins?
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top