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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

i just bought a CB350. The previous owner didn't strike me as a very mechanically inclined guy, and i'm aftaid he never looked at the battery; it's a 6 cell wet battery, and while cells 1, 3, and 5 are full to the brim, cells 2, 4, and 6 look empty. I'm new to wet batteries, but from what I've read that's the opposite of what they're supposed to be filled to. I've read that the cells should be filled to even levels, just enough to cover the
 

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There should be a full level line on the casing somewhere. I'd remove as much as possible from the overfilled cells and add it to the underfilled ones. Use a glass eyedropper if possible. Use proper safety precautions.

Afterward if you need to top off any other cells use distilled water only.

If you have a small led flashlight, those are handy to shine into one side of your battery so that you can easily see the liquid level inside from the opposite side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There should be a full level line on the casing somewhere. I'd remove as much as possible from the overfilled cells and add it to the underfilled ones. Use a glass eyedropper if possible. Use proper safety precautions.

Afterward if you need to top off any other cells use distilled water only.

If you have a small led flashlight, those are handy to shine into one side of your battery so that you can easily see the liquid level inside from the opposite side.
Awesome, thank you. I'll be sure to grab a glass eyedropper on my way home from work.
 

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As a general rule bout 10 to 15mm from where the clear battery body meets the black plastic top correlates to the marked max min lines.....a good battery maintainer will give you an indication bout the batterys overall health....e.g to hold charge.....
 

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Why not get a hydrometer for a battery ?

This will enable you to top up the battery and adjust electrolyte levels via the rubber bulb sucker, and monitor the specific gravity and state of charge etc..

Specific gravity is called relative density, and distilled water is called De ionised water these days.

Electrolyte is still called electrolyte, the solution of pure white after and sulphuric acid, that's SULPHURIC ACID !!!

Read up on wet battery safety and charging, failure to do so could be quite "explosive" with severe burns risk, heat and chemical....

You have been warned !!!
 

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It is not a good idea to move electrolyte from one cell to another.
When you top up the robbed cell with water it will now be diluted and the SG will never come up to the correct value again. Conversely the cells you have added electrolyte to will have their SG increased because they only needed water.
 

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Per Google: Deionized (DI) water is water that has been treated to remove all ions – typically, that means all of the dissolved mineral salts. Distilled water has been boiled so that it evaporates and then re-condensed, leaving most impurities behind. Distillation is one of the oldest methods for creating pure water.


Not the same animal, I can find both here.
 

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It is not a good idea to move electrolyte from one cell to another.
When you top up the robbed cell with water it will now be diluted and the SG will never come up to the correct value again. Conversely the cells you have added electrolyte to will have their SG increased because they only needed water.

That assumes just as much as my suggestion did.

Who can know the condition of the electrolyte in each cell without using a Hydrometer. Motorcycle Specific Hydrometers are available, but can be hard to find. Import quality and low cost betray their level of accuracy.
 

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This talk of lead-acid batteries has reminded me of the 1970's when I was involved with the maintenance of a fleet of deep-sea trawlers. All had proper radio rooms with equipement powered by 24V batteries.
A common sight was the Marconi Marine engineer touring the battery lockers with a watering can and topping up all the cells. Where did he get the water? From the tap over the galley sink of course! And we are in a notoriously hard water area.

Nothing to do with the origjnal question though. I've no idea what the life span of those batteries was 😕
 

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Wikipedia is not a reliable source of accurate information for most purposes, many educators will not accept them as a reference.

I'm glad to discuss anything but I'm not here to argue, you win.
 

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Hey guys, distilled and deionized water is different as indicated.....both "OK" for a battery...
Quality of de-ioinized water varies....the better ones are made by a distillation process followed by reverse osmosis (so more pure than general distilled).....the cheaper ones usually just use precipitation, so not as good as "well made" distilled water.
Distilled water often still contains some residuals like chlorine....unless it uses additional steps e.g. triple distilled and "filtered"...so look for triple distilled if you can find it.

Hydrometers for (checking) bike batteries don't really work specially those filled with "floating balls" (inconsistent readings) but they can tell you if a batteries in a poor state.....but a hydrometer when mixing acid for initial electrolyte addition is fine...remember "do as you oughta, add acid to water" old chemist saying....when diluting!

Going forward....upgrade to a AGM battery.....one of the best things I've done with my bikes.....they only need a refresher charge every 3 to 6 months ....and youll never get boil-over or corrosion secondary to fumes around the battery carrier...
( Re the water question worked in a QC/R&D lab for many years....;))
 

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Gotta agree wholeheartedly with the AGM; it's not that much money, and really does hold it's charge for longer periods of inactivity. While you're at it, look at the date code on your tires. So often a seller will claim "new tires" that are actually 10 years old, but they consider them new since they only drove 100 miles on them. The rubber starts to harden on old tires, and you should NOT ride anything more than, say 5 years old.
 
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