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Discussion Starter #1
Went to change the oil on my 360, and the drain plug is perfectly rounded. I can probably vice-grip it off, but I'll need a new plug.

Does anyone know the correct size, or if there is a cheaper and more readily-available solution than the one that's currently listed on eBay for $30?

Thanks.

-MK
 

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I know the 350 and 450 ones are interchangable.... I have a spare for those.... If it will fit (I'll check today) it's available to you....... Steve
 

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mine was shagged/stripped and solidly locked into drain hole.
ring spanner and extension bar no good, even after made flats with a file.
gentle heat with gas torch and vice-grips with extension...STILL no luck. just could not shift it.

resorted to drilling it and using screw extractor, still no good. at this stage i can say that id never met a sump plug that had been forced in so tight....ever.


cut slots with a hack saw and tapped/banged it unscrewed with a cold chisel and hammer as last resort....(religious referenced expletive)*.

* Mod edit: Some members might find this inappropriate or distastefully used...
 

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The problem with these drain plags are that the contact surface (which is also the diameter of the drain plug at its max) is considerably larger than the area where you turn it (the hex where you put your wrench). A mechanical engineer could probably explain it better, but you probably get the idea.

This used to happen a lot on the fill plug of Honda car manual transmissions when I used to work on them. Try this: get a 6" chisel (or bigger, if that's what you have), and bang a notch into the outer rim of the plug. Basically, you'll point the chisel directly at the center of the plug, and give it a few whacks on the edge to put a notch in it. Be careful that you aren't hitting the oil pan (sic). Once you have a notch, angle the chisel in the notch so its pointing in the direction of "loosen", and whack it again.

An enterprising owner might use a dremel to cut the notch, and then use an air hammer to spin the plug. Just don't use the air hammer on full blast!

71hondacbtwin
 

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Discussion Starter #9
otr002 said:
In all, do your research and life becomes easer :D
Thanks for the tip...

Still trying to get the old one out. Wow is it stuck...

-MK
 

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Mine was stuck a few weeks ago. The nut was not stripped it was just very tight. Just as it was about to 'give' I had a fleeting thought - too late, I may add- that this may not end well. With my hand curled around the socket wrench, (I still cringe when I think about it) that damn thing broke the hold and *WHACK* my middle fingernail went full force into the exhaust pipe. I was fortunate that it split at the cuticle so there was no pressure to build up under the nail. Some blood was spilled and I got a little light headed out in the garage at about 2am. There really is no moral to this story other than watch the projected travel of your all important fingers as you are fighting the nut.

I know how much we all like pictures. I will spare you in this instance. :oops:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I may try that. I have a huge Rigid wrench, and since my drainplug now resembles a well-used lead hammer, it may be my only option at this point.

-MK
 

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try the cold chisel mate. the shock loading acts like a impact wrench freeing the bond between the flat mating surfaces, or the thread, whichever is stuck worse in your case.
 

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Have you guys tried using hex sockets rather than rings. There is another type of socket that pushes on the flats rather than the corners. These will help and Im sure we have all been there at one time or another.
I always add a little copper slip to the threads before I retighten mine now I have to say it does seem to help stop the oxide build up on the plug.

71hondacbtwin said:
The problem with these drain plags are that the contact surface (which is also the diameter of the drain plug at its max) is considerably larger than the area where you turn it (the hex where you put your wrench). A mechanical engineer could probably explain it better, but you probably get the idea.
I believe its called mechanical advantage from many distant years ago at school.
On a normal nut or bolt the thread is usually about half the diameter of the head or nut, giving a 2:1 advantage before the spanner is attached. However the drain plug is the opposite of this with the hex part at half the diameter of the fine threads and thererefor halves the effective length of the spanner.
(not that Im a mechanical engineer so this explanation might be a complete load of cobblers but it sounds ok he he )
 
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