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I get these from a Pazon and thought the group could benefit fro this one

Taking out your ignition system is an expensive mistake to make.
You see, not all ignition coils are the same.
With so many different coils, you need to make sure you have the right ones to suit your ignition system, for not only the best results, but also so you don't suffer an ignition failure.

So how do you know what's right for your ignition system?
First you need to ask the question: what type of ignition do you have on your bike.
How will I know, I hear you ask.
Well, did it come with coils in the ignition kit, or not.
Is it an analogue or digital type system?
Did your bike have points originally, or has it always had electronic ignition on it. Questions, questions.
As you can clearly see, there are many variables, so let's start again, shall we?
Starting with the analogue type system, these are inexpensive and often don't come with ignition coils. These systems are normally designed to work on bikes that were originally fitted with points and condensers. Most analogue systems are designed to work with the original points type coil(s), or an equivalent replacement.

Problems can arise when your original coils are faulty or worn out.
If you're looking to replace those old coils, don't go out and buy those tiny modern coils that sit in the palm of your hand. Yes, they are neat and light, and can be tucked out of the way, but like Joe with his wrong pickup line blowing up in his face, these coils will do the same. And this will more often than not damage other ignition parts too.
You see, these digital coils have a much lower primary resistance rating than the points type coils. For the digital coils, the typical primary resistance range is 0.5 to 1 ohms, compared to between 2 to 4 ohms for the points type coils - a big difference.

So why does this difference in resistance matter?
The lower the resistance, the higher the power drawn through the ignition coil.
Extra load is also placed on the ignition unit ('black box') and battery.
This extra power means ignition parts run hotter, and can fail as a result.
The points type ignition coils are designed to be switched on for a long time, necessary to fully saturate (charge) the coil before it is turned off.
The digital type coils are designed to be switched on for a very short period, before being turned off. So, running an analogue system (or the original points) with a digital type coil, will mean that the coil is switched on for too long, drawing too much power.
By contrast, running a digital system with a points type coil will result in the coil being switched on for too short a time, resulting in very weak sparks and poor performance.
If you have a digital system on your bike, or are about to purchase one, those neat little coils will normally be included with the kit. These systems will be designed specifically to work with them, for maximum performance.
 

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Hi Group
There to types of ignition system in common use on motorcycles. One is the Kettering system. This was invented here! Well about 25 miles west of here and probably improved to the point that it was a usable system rather than invented. This is the classic points, capacitor, and coil system. This is what most of our Honda twins came with. Many electronic ignition systems replace the points with a power transistor. The other is the Capacitive Discharge Ignition. The CDI charges a capacitor then dump the charge in the capacitor through the ignition coil.
My guess is that these people are calling the Kettering system an analogue system and calling the CDI system a Digital system. This is nonsense! I do not know any Kettering system based electronic ignitions that use a digital processor but I expect that there are some out there. But many CDI systems have no digital processor in them.
If we accept there screwy system type definitions the point that they make is correct.
Points are good for about 4 amps. The current in a transistor ignition system based on the Kettering system is limited by the power transistor. So system are set up to handle much more than 4 amps some are not. AS CDI dumps what ever is in the capacitor through the ignition coil I think the question becomes can the coil take the high instantaneous current?
TomC in Ohio

"So how do you know what's right for your ignition system?
First you need to ask the question: what type of ignition do you have on your bike.
How will I know, I hear you ask.
Well, did it come with coils in the ignition kit, or not.
Is it an analogue or digital type system?
Did your bike have points originally, or has it always had electronic ignition on it. Questions, questions.
As you can clearly see, there are many variables, so let's start again, shall we?
Starting with the analogue type system, these are inexpensive and often don't come with ignition coils. These systems are normally designed to work on bikes that were originally fitted with points and condensers. Most analogue systems are designed to work with the original points type coil(s), or an equivalent replacement."
 
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