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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Considering the time and trouble to get it replaced I would go with new.
Square stock is another name for bar stock or steel bar, in this case it's square instead of flat bar.
 

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I get it, that idea is much clearer now and yet another perfect way to make this tool. I will start in a bit when this coffee kicks in.
 

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For the size square stock you will need, ask for "keystock"....Its higher carbon steel and can be hardened.....
 

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I have yet to tear down my CM400 that far, so don't know how much room there is inside the clutch, but couldn't you replace that notched nut for a regular nut? Leo
 

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It's funny. I was looking for away to remove the nut and thought of using a pipe or a wrench socket after spending some time searching in the garage. I decided to take a look at Hondatwins and of course LDR has already done it. It made the choice easy but how do you remove the nut when everything just spins?
You need a holder, I had to think for a while and came up with a solution by drilling a piece of wood. I'm just curious what everyone else did since nobody mentions this problem.
 

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If you're reading this then you've discovered what the rest of us know. Nobody makes one, so you have 2 choices for removing and reinstalling the clutch hub nut. 1) use a punch to drive it off and on or 2) make a socket.
Using a punch to take it off is ok but putting it on tight enough is improbable. Under the nut there is a concave washer [attachment=7:1fyhrcym]201_4458.JPG[/attachment:1fyhrcym]that functions as a lock washer, marked on one side as "outside", that's directional. [attachment=6:1fyhrcym]201_4457.JPG[/attachment:1fyhrcym]
Stuff needed:
15/16" 12 point socket
Dremel tool/motor
Dremel cutoff blade(Dremel Part #EZ406) and grinding drum
10" mill file
the bloody nut
Note: you'll want to file off any distortions on the nut from using the punch before trying to fit the nut to the socket
[attachment=2:1fyhrcym]201_4455.JPG[/attachment:1fyhrcym]
Starting with the socket[attachment=5:1fyhrcym]201_4441.JPG[/attachment:1fyhrcym] Wrap it in tape to make cut marks on[attachment=4:1fyhrcym]201_4445.JPG[/attachment:1fyhrcym] The tabs line up with 4 of the 12 inner points and you'll be cutting out 8 of those or 2 between each tab. The depth of the tabs is 7mm and the width is 5mm. [attachment=3:1fyhrcym]201_4449.JPG[/attachment:1fyhrcym]Using the Dremel tool and cutoff blade cut down to make the tabs, then across between the tabs. Depending on the size of the cutoff wheel you may not be able to cut that out completely without cutting into the tabs which you don't want to do since they'll be weak. Cut as much as you can and break the section out. Now that the larger section is out grind the inner section of the socket tabs for clearance on the nut[attachment=1:1fyhrcym]201_4450.JPG[/attachment:1fyhrcym] Now with the mill file narrow the tabs to get them all to fit the nut and so the nut drops into the socket[attachment=0:1fyhrcym]201_4453.JPG[/attachment:1fyhrcym] Now remove the tape and you're done :D :D
This took less than an hour to make and now I know I'll have the nut tight and right.

Or you can buy one here for $41.66 instead of a $5 socket and some time spent http://www.hondapartsnow.com/genuine/ho ... 20203.html
I made one of these today. It worked like a charm. I also made a holder to hold the clutch from turning while getting the bolt out. Thanks for the write-up on how to make one. Very much appreciated.

Jay
 

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It's funny. I was looking for away to remove the nut and thought of using a pipe or a wrench socket after spending some time searching in the garage. I decided to take a look at Hondatwins and of course LDR has already done it. It made the choice easy but how do you remove the nut when everything just spins?
You need a holder, I had to think for a while and came up with a solution by drilling a piece of wood. I'm just curious what everyone else did since nobody mentions this problem.
I made a holder out of plywood. I drilled a hole in the center for the socket tool and holes for the bolts. I used the lifter plate as a template for the holes.



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I made a holder out of plywood. I drilled a hole in the center for the socket tool and holes for the bolts. I used the lifter plate as a template for the holes...
Nice, so did I. I just put the plate on a piece of wood and drilled like you did. Mine is longer so it rests on the footpeg when I losen the nut.
 

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Is it funny that I saw that the other day in an IchibanMoto video? I didn't know if it was for real or not, thanks for confirming it will work.

I held the clutch basket in my 250 Nighthawk with a 1.5" length of 1.5" square steel tube stock (held in a C (or G) clamp) while I turned the nut loose.

 

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Is it funny that I saw that the other day in an IchibanMoto video? I didn't know if it was for real or not, thanks for confirming it will work.

I held the clutch basket in my 250 Nighthawk with a 1.5" length of 1.5" square steel tube stock (held in a C (or G) clamp) while I turned the nut loose.

It worked great along with the custom cut socket. Came right off.


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I was surprised how easily mine came off too. 38 ft/lbs is spec on my 250 Nighthawk (and 250 Rebels) it certainly wasn't torqued to spec.
 

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And maybe it's just me being overly cautious, but if it were mine I'd be using all 4 bolts in the clutch hub to spread the load around better, just to be safe
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
And maybe it's just me being overly cautious, but if it were mine I'd be using all 4 bolts in the clutch hub to spread the load around better, just to be safe
Those post are fragile, not designed for torsional strength. I stick a penny in the gears, crank to basket.
 

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I'll be trying that one when I reassemble.

Do you recommend the 1962-1982 U.S. pennies with their 95% copper content vs the later ones that were 97.5% zinc? Or is zinc soft enough on the gears? 🤪
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I prefer to use the first one I find in my pocket, never the 2nd one but maybe the 3rd. I'm an odd type person.
Any coin will be fine, they're all soft metal. I use pennies because I'm cheap.
 

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I was surprised how easily mine came off too. 38 ft/lbs is spec on my 250 Nighthawk (and 250 Rebels) it certainly wasn't torqued to spec.
Mine came off easy too but 38ft/lbs is not much.
I tried to lock the wheel but I felt a "softness" (can't find a better english word) I didn't like when I began to unscrew the clutch nut. I don't know if it was because of the the chain or something else. The wood tool worked great, I used 4 bolts but not much force is needed however from now on I will keep in mind that the basket is fragile.

LRD 😂 Ok, the first penny it is.
 

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Mine came off easy too but 38ft/lbs is not much.
I tried to lock the wheel but I felt a "softness" (can't find a better english word) I didn't like when I began to unscrew the clutch nut. I don't know if it was because of the the chain or something else. The wood tool worked great, I used 4 bolts but not much force is needed however from now on I will keep in mind that the basket is fragile.

LRD 😂 Ok, the first penny it is.
I did read and watch a few videos where the instruction was to just hold the clutch basket with one hand and turn the ratchet with the other. Mine was oily and dripping so that was out in my case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I did read and watch a few videos where the instruction was to just hold the clutch basket with one hand and turn the ratchet with the other. Mine was oily and dripping so that was out in my case.
Someone has stronger hands and arms than I do if they can hold the basket while torquing or loosening. 38 ft/lbs isn't a huge amount of torque per se but it's more than I would even think about trying. I suspect they're not torquing the nut, just getting as tight as they can and later down the road wondering why they have clutch problems.
 

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Someone has stronger hands and arms than I do if they can hold the basket while torquing or loosening. 38 ft/lbs isn't a huge amount of torque per se but it's more than I would even think about trying. I suspect they're not torquing the nut, just getting as tight as they can and later down the road wondering why they have clutch problems.
I think they were probably removing an already loosened nut, you know YouTube style. Improbable and hard to duplicate here in the real physical universe where the rest of us live.
 
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