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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to install clubman bars on my 71 CB 350 and am planning to cut them down as tight as the controls will allow, but I'm wondering why some people do not cut them to size. It seems to me that the bars out of the box are way too long, and put your arms way too far out.

But am I missing something? Is there any downside to making the bars shorter that I'm not considering?

Clubman do.JPG Clubman dont.JPG
 

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One downside is that with the shorter bars there is less leverage for turning. If you can try them first before cutting to see how they are and then cut down a bit if you feel you would like it a bit shorter. I had them on a bike a few years back and I believe I ended up cutting them down by about an inch or so.
 

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More steering leverage with longer bars. If you use a disc brake, then that and the switches should give you plenty of bar. Or like in the pic. Why not try it out first to see if it's comfortable/easier to handle, and hack em off if you like it.
 

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less steering leverage, less clearance causing the bar to hit the tank when turning or parking, etc.....
 

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And oh yeah, the shorter bar is going to make riding that bike very uncomfortable very quickly.
Especially at the angle your wrists would be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hmmm, see, I would think that the longer the bars are, the wider and lower your hands would be. Cutting them would put your hands closer in and higher.

My FZR has clip-ons and I don't have issues with steering leverage or an uncomfortable positioning.

I'll try it both ways before cutting them down.

Good advice, thanks all
 

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You’re only gong to find out if cutting them works for you so Chop em. And report back.
 

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I had a BSA A65 back in 1983; and I fitted chopped bars. Hit a raised Manhole cover; fell off; went to school; bled out in the classroom and nearly died. That was a few years ago granted but I’m still here. If you have an Idea, follow it using all your intellect and if it works; patent the idea and prosper.
Merry Christmas.
Nigel
 

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Yes, most of them are made too long. I cut some of the length off mine, but not as short as in your first picture. The wider they are, the more hunched over you are. It also kills me to see people rotate them straight down - that's the most awkward, uncomfortable-looking mess I've ever seen.
image.jpg
 

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There are two forces at play here, one is ergonomics and the other is aerodynamics. Ergo wise, your wrists should be straight into the grips with the bar at 90 degrees to our forearm. you don't want your wrists to bend when you are in your riding position. Aero wise is a little more difficult. The riding position should be 'tuned' to the most common speed you ride at. The goal is to minimize the weight or conversely the pull on your arms. Upright wide bars work for slower speeds. At slow speeds your arms are only holding the bars, but as you go faster you will need to 'hang on' against the wind blast. Bringing your arms closer together will reduce the size of your body 'sail' and leaning forward will balance against the wind blast. Clubman and clipon handlebars are intended for high speed riding. Everybody is different, I find the European style bars from the CB400F work great for my 450. I ride mostly secondary roads, when I get on the freeway I can slide back on the seat a little and this puts more weight on my arms. Around town I slide as far forward as possible on the seat. My GL1200 has the full fairing and that allows me to sit upright at all speeds. The GL1100 will be naked and it has the stock tall bars. I have seen European style bars on the GL1000. These principals will apply to the 1100 bar selection.
 
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