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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it necessary to clear coat over buffed aluminum to keep it sharp?
Will clear lacquer stick to it?
Adheasion primer?
Wondering if it can handle the engine heat.
I think alittle polishing once in a while would suffice.
 

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scout4924 said:
Is it necessary to clear coat over buffed aluminum to keep it sharp?
Will clear laqour stick to it?
Adheasion primer?
Wondering if it can handle the engine heat.
I think alittle polishing once in a while would suffice.

No,-- Lacquer will melt off an engine (cam covers, points covers, valve covers-- probably the side cases too) like wax off a birthday candle.

And, again--no,
"a little polishing" will not suffice. A lot of polishing will be needed-- depending on riding conditions. Any clear coat you put on it will take away some of the shine.
However, the results (to me) are worth the effort. A 3 or 4 inch good quality buffing wheel on the end of a electric (not battery powered-- ain't fast enough) drill and some polishing compound (the white or brown stick-- not the paste), makes it a fairly quick and easy job.
A follow up with a good wax helps a bit.
 

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scout4924 said:
Is it necessary to clear coat over buffed aluminum to keep it sharp?
Will clear laqour stick to it?
Adheasion primer?
Wondering if it can handle the engine heat.
I think alittle polishing once in a while would suffice.
I just asked the same question over on dotheton. I got a couple of different answers, all I think were valid. You have to remember that these things came from Honda with cleared engine cases and the like. Granted by the time most of us get a hold of these old bike the clear is old and yellow but most of the time these bikes have been left outside and they are 40yrs old! That's not to say that clearing is a good idea but it has and can be done. One of the posts to my question I thought was interesting was the clear that was specificly made for polished metal, it's at the bottom of the page, it talks about "glisten pc". I may go this route but I'm leaning toward powder coating. Read the thread below. Good luck!
http://www.dotheton.com/forum/index.php?topic=18758.0
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The ton link failed but I did find this.
http://www.por15.com/GLISTEN-PC/productinfo/GPCGG/
It's high priced stuff.

Looks like the same company that sells the fuel tank liner. That has mixed reviews, mostly due to poor application methods.

I got the covers looking nice now. Just woondering if my handy work will last or turn to crap in short order.
 

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scout4924 said:
The ton link failed but I did find this.
http://www.por15.com/GLISTEN-PC/productinfo/GPCGG/
It's high priced stuff.

Looks like the same company that sells the fuel tank liner. That has mixed reviews, mostly due to poor application methods.

I got the covers looking nice now. Just woondering if my handy work will last or turn to crap in short order.
I think their sever is down. They get a lot of traffic and that seems to happen fairly often. Try the link again later, maybe it'll come up. Like I said I think I'm going to go the powder coating route, and since the metal is prepped and their is really not a whole lot of stuff if you're just doing engine covers I can't imagine it would be crazy expensive to get done if you shop around a bit.
I see your from IA, I have a job interview next week in Sioux City. Other side of the state from you I guess but at least I know there is some stuff going on up there with these bikes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Your talking clear powder coat? I guess I never considered it caome in a clear.
You don't see too many cafe' style bikes in this area. That was part of the reason I decided to build one. Heres a link to my Flickr photos of a 500f I did a couple years back. It's the typical style bobber I suppose. :cool:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
 

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Yeah if that thread I posted to dotheton comes up there is a guy that powdercoats for a living and he posted a few pics of some stuff he has done. He said it had to be done right so if you go that route you may want to ask to see a few examples for the clear work they have done.
 

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Engine cases from Honda are all painted, clear or Aluminum color. Cylinders and heads are bare aluminum. There are a couple of reasons for this. First, is the temperatures the part will see, next is the material used in the castings. The heads around the exhaust valve area are the highest temperatures an internal combustion engine will see. In relation to the cylinders and heads, the engine cases are relativity cool.
By nature, pure aluminum is fairly stable and corrosion resistant. The downside is pure aluminum is very soft. It does alloy well and the strength can be greatly increased. With this in mind the basic Honda design uses a more benign alloy for the heads and cylinders. The casings are high strength alloyed with Zinc. Unfortunately, in the presence of an electrolyte, zinc and aluminum make a pretty good battery. These parts are very susceptible to corrosion and require protection and maintenance. This is the reason Honda applies a coating to these parts. Other maintenance plans can be used such as polish and wax, but this is very labor intensive. In comparison, classic British bikes use benign alloys in their casings. They are 3-4 times as thick as the Honda casings.
Currently I'm bringing my Goldwing back to life after 10 years in the garage. I have developed a clear costing process that is really close to the factory finish and I'm really happy about how it came out. It should be a durable as well. In the factory Honda either paints the cases or polishes them. The polished cases are sprayed with clear lacquer. I used a similar process at home with great results. So far i have applied it to the polished carb parts. The castings have a nice deep luster and the clear coat has great adhesion. This is process based:

1. strip the factory finish using aviation stripper.

2. polish the aluminum to the desired luster.

3. detergent wash the excess buffing compound.
Note: At this point do not touch the parts with bare skin.

4. Deoxidize the aluminum with Turco Alumiprep No. 33* per the instructions on the bottle.

5. apply Alodine 1001* (not 1200 as it is gold colored) per the instructions on the bottle. This is similar to passivation of steel.

6. apply your favorite clear coat. I used Dupont Acrylic clear

* Available from Aircraft Spruce and Specialties http://www.aircraftspruce.com/menus/cs/ ... plies.html

Note: the chemicals listed are hazardous to your health. If you like you kidneys be sure to use protective gloves and read the MSDS sheets.

This is how they turned out:
 

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