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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do i clean my fork bodies?

engine cases?

what do i do? Never been here before...
 

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Sensei
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First, you'll have to remove any remaining clearcoat and/or paint....I use an aerosol paint stripper made by Mar-Hyde and it works very well. Spray it on...wait ten minutes, hose off with water... Once the "plastic' is off the metal, sand/smooth any imperfections or stains...... Repaint or polish......
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i think the plastic is gone.

i rubbed some sos pads on it, and it was metal dust, no plastic flaking?


what's a good paper grit process?

800, 1200, 1500 with polishing compound?
 

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Are you going for the polished look, or are you painting??

Go ahead and use that Aircraft Paint Remover that Steve mentioned. the metal flakes you saw could be the SOS pad.
If there's any coating at all remaining, it will take forever to polish.

bill
 

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JeyLux said:
i think the plastic is gone.

i rubbed some sos pads on it, and it was metal dust, no plastic flaking?


what's a good paper grit process?

800, 1200, 1500 with polishing compound?
Hi JeyLux,
Once the clearcoat is removed, and depending on how gouged or nicked up the fork lowers are determines what paper to start with. If you have some gouges and nicks, work them with at least a 320 wet working perpendicular to the length of the fork tube. Do not sand up and down the length of the tube. It's better to be able to have the forks off the bike and at the very least, lying on a bench or table and rolling the fork as you sand it. A bench vice holding the fork tube in a thick wrap like a towel works also.

So, 320, 400, 600 will give you the "brushed aluminum" look that is pretty close to stock appearance. If you want high gloss, keep going up on the sandpaper grit and achieve the luster you're looking for. Be sure that you don't focus your sanding too much in one area; you can leave divots in the metal that you won't see until you think your finished and standing a few feet away -- a real "aw, sh*t" moment.

The final decision to make is whether or not to clear coat your newly prepped work. I just hand polished the front and rear hubs on my CL and used a rattle can clear coat and was extremely disappointed in the result. It turned a nice high shine finished into a cloudy/dull finish. To fix it, I had to break out the paint remover and do them all over. I've opted to keep them protected with aluminum polish/sealer. I know this works well b/c I machine buffed my alt cover/points cover and clutch cover on my CB160 about 3 years ago and they still look the same with just the aluminum polish/sealer I put on at the time.


Take your time and don't rush the job and you'll be well rewarded.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the great info!


I have a lot of work to do ...
 

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MilestoGo said:
JeyLux said:
...... do them all over. .

How well I know that routine.
I'm making my third pass at painting a tank right now.
I do ok till I try to put the stripes on.
Oh to be friends with a graphic artist - I'm terrible.

bill
 

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How I did some parts for my SL125 cafe racer project:

The beginning:



Use a product called "aircraft stripper". Kind of a glorified paint stripper. This does a good job getting the OEM finish off. Here's a look after several applications of it (it doesn't get it all of on the first try). I use a scotch brite pad and water to clean it off.









Next, sanded with 240 grit wet sanding, then 600 grit wet sanding, then 1500 grit wet sanding, then 2000 grit wet sanding. Pretty tedious, but not too bad. Your final results will directly reflect how fussy you are with all these steps.






Then, use a cloth buffer wheel set up in a bench grinder, drill press, hand drill, etc. First couple attempts, use white rouge paste on the wheel. Then, using a different wheel, use tripoli paste on the wheel. There's a third, finer polishing compound available, but I didn't happen to use it. Followed off with some polish like Mother's Aluminum polish.







Took one day to do all the bits and bobs you see. Plus, the pictures don't do it justice - the before components looked worse in person, and the after parts look better in person.

Kirk
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
that's pretty much exactly the info i was looking for, very nicely done. My CL350 case looks like your post stripped finish, and so does my CB500 forks.

I can't wait to make them pretty again.
 

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What kind of paint, and what kind of prep did you do to the rest of the motor to paint it black? I like the look you have going and might have to duplicate it on my 350F.

- Woody

kirkn said:
How I did some parts for my SL125 cafe racer project:

The beginning:

Use a product called "aircraft stripper". Kind of a glorified paint stripper. This does a good job getting the OEM finish off. Here's a look after several applications of it (it doesn't get it all of on the first try). I use a scotch brite pad and water to clean it off.

Next, sanded with 240 grit wet sanding, then 600 grit wet sanding, then 1500 grit wet sanding, then 2000 grit wet sanding. Pretty tedious, but not too bad. Your final results will directly reflect how fussy you are with all these steps.


Then, use a cloth buffer wheel set up in a bench grinder, drill press, hand drill, etc. First couple attempts, use white rouge paste on the wheel. Then, using a different wheel, use tripoli paste on the wheel. There's a third, finer polishing compound available, but I didn't happen to use it. Followed off with some polish like Mother's Aluminum polish.


Took one day to do all the bits and bobs you see. Plus, the pictures don't do it justice - the before components looked worse in person, and the after parts look better in person.

Kirk
 

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Thanks. It was just generic rattle-can high-temp semi-gloss black paint. Don't remember off-hand what brand, but I'll look after work.

This is the third motor I've used it on, and it holds up very well. On super-hot parts, like exhaust pipes within 6" of the head, it burns off, but on every other part (cylinders, heads, cases, mufflers further away from the head, etc) it held up well.

Plus, I like the semi-gloss sheen. Gloss paint is just too artificially shiny, and flat doesn't look right either.

As for prep, I had split the cases on this rebuild, and I painted 'em while apart. They were thoroughly degreased and dried, then sandblasted using my cheapie Harbor-Freight total-loss outdoor sandblaster with ordinary sandbox sand. The blaster setup is maybe $40 plus a $39 hood and a 50-lb bag of sand is about $3 at Home Depot.

Degreased & masked, before blasting:


After blasting:


Done:



*edit* Here y'go:

 

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When painting with rattle can clear coat, air temp is critical. Cool air is what causes the clouding. I won't even try it unless the temp is above 70.
 

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I'll second that!..... But the metal you are painting must be above 70 degrees as well, and STAY that way until the paint is completely dry.... I keep the parts inside a heated building overnight to assure they are " warmed through... not just "surface warmed"..... And, HUMIDITY is also a factor to consider....Too humid will "fog" clearcoats and color coats...... Not just rattle-can either..... Steve
 

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I'll throw my two cents worth in here....

I've found the Duplicolor engine enamel to be good stuff, cheap, and widely available - apply thin, it will run on you. I generally use self-etching primer underneath.
And I always bake the parts after they've dried, if possible - instructions are on the can, I usually do it at about 200 degrees for an hour or so.
Once it's baked the stuff is incredibly hard - you can dig your thumbnail into the surface as hard as you can, and it won't leave a mark at all. But carb cleaner, the dreaded brake fluid, and solvents will still attack it. Gasoline not so much, if you clean it up quick. And it will chip if you drop stuff on it, like tools or whatever.

Of course, the engine or parts need to be disassembled before you throw them in the oven. I just use pieces of wire to make little hooks and suspend the parts from the very top oven rack. And remove all the seals and gaskets first, naturally.

Parts which may be critically affected by the heat shouldn't be baked.
However most engine parts can easily withstand the relatively low 200 degrees with no ill effects.
And there is probably no paint that's easily available that could survive being on exhaust pipes all that well (especially within the first 6" from the engine), so don't expect much there.
 

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Hope you all don't mind me jumping right in here..

What kind of aluminum sealer are you all using, after polishing/buffing cases, etc, to a mirror finish. I'd like to keep em that way, but don't know of any sealers currently on the market...?

GB :mrgreen:
 

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None. Never found a coating or paint that works. At least on the mirror finish.

For lesser finishes, ie just 'brushed' or 'clean' finish, rattle-can clear coat seems to works well. And, what the others have said about how to keep it from getting cloudy.

Kirk
 

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Kirkn, I like the pics of your cases after sand blasting. Did you strip the clearcoat/paint off before blasting, or did ya just blast away? Very intrested in doing the same thing on my 360 and 350 motors!
 
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