Honda Twins banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I'm new to the forum and currently in the process of rebuilding my 722A carbs for my 72 Cl350! I purchased the bike about a month ago and the PO said it fired when he sprayed carb cleaner in it, I confirmed this when I got home. But this also had gas in it while it sat since 2013, we all know how that goes. I cleaned the fuel tank out now which is just about spotless and rebuilt the petcock and installed a new fuel cap gasket. The tank is currently sitting on the shelf filled with gas leak free. Onto the carbs.

So I tore down the carbs completely and soaked them in Berryman's Chem dip for 24 hours two different times. I noticed the bowls and jetting area had a white almost calcium looking residue you could maybe call it?

*NOTE: In some pictures the carb is still wet from rinsing*
In the 3rd picture of the right carb bowl area you can really see what I'm talking about. I was told that simple green would remove it easily so I put them in for about 10 minutes in a simple green mixture in my ultrasonic cleaner but did not want to leave them to long in fear of discoloring the bodies, I also tried scrubbing it off with a toothbrush to no avail. What would your advice be? Run it the way it is or do you know a better trick?

Also, I noticed the choke butterfly screws on one of the carbs are loose. Is it at simple as tightening them back up? I had a quad that I loosened the throttle butterfly's and they told me to JB Weld the scews back in does the same thing apply here?

Thanks for any help everyone I do have a Clymer Manual that I have been working along with!

Here is a picture of the bowl area on my left carb


Here is a picture of the first bowl


Here is a picture of the bowl area on my right carb


Here is a picture of the second bowl
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
Do not use JB weld on the butterfly screws. If you want to use anything for peace of mind, use a drop of red loctite on the threads. JB weld can potentially chip once hardened and you don't want a piece of that going through your intake valves and into your engine. Just my $0.02

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
Have you tried a bit of kerosene/diesel and some fine steel wool for the calcified deposits in the bowl? Maybe also a few wooden toothpicks to chip away at the really stubborn chunks. Just an idea.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Have you tried a bit of kerosene/diesel and some fine steel wool for the calcified deposits in the bowl? Maybe also a few wooden toothpicks to chip away at the really stubborn chunks. Just an idea.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk
I have not tried that but I will give that an attempt and see if it gets me anywhere? I there anything other than kerosene or diesel I could use that I might already have in my garage? I have steel wool but no kerosene/diesel.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
You could use gasoline, not quite the same effect but it might work. Gasoline is a solvent, so it's good at breaking down certain types of deposits. Whereas kerosene and diesel are fuel oils, so they are great at not only dissolving certain things, but also keeping the particles in suspension as you scrub, so in essence it acts like a detergent.
You can get a small can/jug of distilled white kerosene at your local hardware store for relatively cheap. It is sold as lantern fuel and/or heater fuel. It can be filtered/strained through a paper-type coffee filter and reused many times for cleaning purposes.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
If you do go that route, I would recommend a follow up bath in the ultrasonic cleaner to get rid of any dislodged dirt and metallic particles left behind by the steel wool. Possibly a blast through all the passages with an air nozzle after that as well.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,571 Posts
A trip to the local NAPA store and pick up a can of NAPA carb cleaner. The choke screws should have a small slots in the back. Snug up the screw and spread the gap a little.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,085 Posts
Hello all,

I'm new to the forum...

...Thanks for any help everyone I do have a Clymer Manual that I have been working along with!
Welcome - nice breakdown of what you're doing. You should get a FSM (factory shop manual) and retire that Clymer to doorstop or beer coaster duty, they are notoriously incorrect often. Here's a link to download one. https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8RLEMngUB63YV9TYm1maVkzb0E/edit Since this is your first post, please read the link below and do an Introduction so we can get to know you and your bike better

https://www.hondatwins.net/forums/23-member-introductions/121120-critical-read-before-posting.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,475 Posts
Just use a wire wheel on a Dreamel tool to remove the oxidation from the insides of the carb bodies. As for cleaning solutions, the carb dip is fine, but all you need is Dawn dish soap and water in your ultrasonic cleaner. Other chemicals like Simple Green will attack the Zinc and Anodized coatings on the steel parts and cause them to rust. As for rebuild parts, just go to your local Honda dealer ande get new seal/O-ring kits. Honda still has them. The aftermarket kits SUCK!
TOOLS
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,006 Posts
It looks like you soaked the carb bodys with the throttle plate still intack.

If so you have washed all of the OIL out of the Felt Washers that seal the Throttle Shafts from a vacum leak.
You will need to remove and disassemble the throttle plates and oil the felt washers.

When you re-assbele be sure to get the throttle plates back in EXACTLY as they were when removed.
The edges are beveled for sealing purposes.

As TOOLS1 Said use RED Locktite to secure the throttle plate screws.

Also Do NOT ATTEMPT no matter how TEMPTED you are to remove the screws that secure the Choke & Throttle Plates to the shafts with a PHILLIPS Head Screw Driver.
NONE of what "LOOKS" Like a Phillips Head Screw on these bikes "IS" a Phillips Head.

They are JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard)
The Angle of the "+" is VERY different and using a Phillips Heads "WILL Cause them to strip.
Here is a LINK to an Excellent Set:
https://www.amazon.com/Hozan-JIS-4-...ocphy=9003799&hvtargid=pla-503880026860&psc=1

Also note: The Throttle & Choke Plate screws were DRILLED on the back side and PUNCHED to Expand the back end to prevent them from coming loose.
To Remove you will need to work them In/Out SLOWLY or you can damage them.
It is nearly impossible to replicate the PUNCH Expansion that is why you will need to use RED LOCTITE.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
More important than any calcium deposits is to make sure your idle jet and any emulsifier tube holes are open and clean. You should be able to hold the jet up to a light and see a tiny, and I mean tiny, hole right through the center of the jet. I use a #10 guitar string to clean those small holes followed by judicial application of a spray carb or brake cleaner. If you don't get a good solid spray through the jets it will not idle properly, if at all, and have a bad hesitation on accell Don't think that just because you soaked those jets in Berrymans, which is an excellent carb dip, that your jets are clean.... You can leave them in the dip for a week but only spray carb/brake cleaner will actually clean them. Also I hope you gently screwed the idle mixture screws in and counted the turns. Those have to come out and be cleaned. Then put it back in to the same number of turns. Only when you can spray carb/brake cleaner through the hole where the idle jet installs and have the spray come out into the carb throat, is that circuit clean. Good luck and have fun.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DieselKrampus
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top