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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Honda 1974 CL 360. I had been riding the bike for about a year when a Diaphragm busted on one side. So i decided to replace it with a set a mikunis. Since i got those I had to get a new smaller battery because the new airpods are to long and get in the way. Now with the new set up The bike does not fire on both cylinders and it switches which side it does not want to fire on. I thought maybe the battery because of it being the only really new electrical component was the problem but when I plugged in the old battery same results. I have since replaced the points and also got new ignition coils. Still the same problem. It idles fine most of the time but on high power it just does not like to run on both cylinders.

Any Ideas?
 

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You changed the battery and you changed the carburetors. The battery affects both cylinders equally, no way it can work on one side and not the other. Each carburetor affects only one cylinder, no influence on the other. If you're having problems with one cylinder firing and not the other you need to concentrate on the system that affects each cylinder independently.

Welcome to the group.

Got pictures?:p
 

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Sensei
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What size Mikunis are you running, and did you port match the new intake tracts?
 

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Discussion Starter #4

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Not contradicting J-T, but a low battery voltage often results in a misfire, usually one cylinder....Check Battery voltage.

Also, you replaced the carburetors because a $20 Diaphragm went bad? This place has them: JBM Industries Rubber Carburetor Boot Socket Holders & Diaphragms

You made yourself a lot of extra work....

I do not have mikunis, but have noticed on this site and others, that pre-jetted carbs rarely work out of the box....

Also, VM30's are a little large for the CL360, and VM28 would be the more appropriate size.

It seems many people are led to believe a larger carburetor will perform better. This isn't usually true, unless you have some major mechanical work done, such as a more agressive cam, larger displacement, etc. What is appropriate on a mostly full throttle race track is not usually appropriate for normal street riding....

At any rate, check your voltage at idle and above 3000 RPM. The voltage on a charged battery is 12.6 Volt. A 100% discharged battery is 12.0 volts. This is assuming you have a traditional lead-acid battery (including AGM) and not the Lithium Ion batteries people are fond of using.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Ya if i would have known that much work had to be done I would have just done the simple diaphragm switch. Hey thanks for the Tip I will give it a shot. I already did try the old battery to see if maybe I had a bad new one. Same issue is happening I guess i could check the charging system maybe it is not working properly and leading to weird issues.
Thanks for the Info
 
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