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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I guess this will serve as my introduction post as well as my build thread. I've had possession of this 1972 CL350 that was left to me by a family member. It had been sitting in a barn then a shop since the 80's but cosmetically is in "decent" shape overall. I was able to start it and get it to idle on one cylinder two years ago before putting it back in storage, now that I'm done with an SL100 project I'm ready to begin restoring this bike and getting it back on the road. :cool:

I've attached two pics of how the bike currently looks sitting in my garage.

I'm currently waiting on a new battery to arrive for the bike before I start trying to get the bike running, until then I'll be strictly working on cleaning it up and inspecting the carbs. :cry:

What are the best sites for getting parts for these older Hondas? It looks like I'm going to have to spend some good coin for a new pair of air filters regardless of where I get them...

-Jake
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·


Thanks! Great link for parts that I was not aware of before. That's certainly the lowest price for an air filter that I've seen so far. I'll keep searching until I reach the point where I'm going to start the bike.

I plan to pull the carbs to inspect/clean them tomorrow morning. I'll probably be replacing every fuel/vacuum line as well as the fuel filters I see inline to the carbs tomorrow.

-Jake
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Instead of messing with carbs I decided to live the cables on the bike since they were all frozen up and not operating correctly. After removing them and running cable lube through the lines they now all function properly. Now I'm not worried about buying new cables which is great.

IMG_5073.jpg

I decided to inspect the front sprocket and clutch mechanism behind the left side cover and promptly had to cut two of the screw heads of since they were previously stripped by a previous owner. Looks like the hardware holding the cases together is made of the same cheese metal that old Hondas are known to have. :mad: I'll be replacing them with hex head screws today if possible.

The clutch bearing inside the sprocket cover was also something knew to me. I removed, cleaned, and repacked it with grease. The original grease was obviously from the 1970's and had hardened over time.

Slowly but surely, I'm making some progress. :cool:

-Jake
 

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There is nothing wrong with the screws Honda used, it is the so called mechanics that try to use Phillips screwdrivers on the JIS screws. If you use the proper JIS screwdriver they come right out. Another good option for removing the JIS screws is to use an impact driver. Most impact driver bits are straight cut like the JIS and fit pretty good into the screws.
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If you could go back in time and compare the overall quality of the hardware and machines of the era, I'd think you'd find that Honda was among the highest quality available at the time. A chisel used on the side of the round screw head as a last resort to getting a stripped screw head turning has always worked for me, I've never had to resort to cutting off a screw head. As Tools mentioned above, using the proper JIS tool works wonders on those screws still serviceable
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I didn't have any issues at all removing the screws that were undamaged with my JIS screw drivers. My main problems were with the ones that were already damaged by some hamfisted previous owner, they had to all be cut off except for one which I was able to dremel a slot in for removal with a flat head screw driver.

Now I find myself in a pickle since there where five total screws that were destroyed. I've decided to convert the sprocket cover bolts to stainless Allen heads for ease of removal in the future. The countersunk screws that where destroyed will be replaced by stainless versions since that's all that I can find locally, although I may have to machine my own for several of the more unusual lengths I'm finding.

-Jake
 

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You can buy Honda screw kits on ebay. Better then the cheap metal used in the $30 "every screw ever in any color you want" kits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You can buy Honda screw kits on ebay. Better then the cheap metal used in the $30 "every screw ever in any color you want" kits.
Hell, I feel silly for not looking there first. :mrgreen:

I've got a whole set of Allen head stainless screws on the way now. From one Jake to another, thanks!

I've begun the process of breaking loose all of the old ones and so far with my JIS screw drivers I haven't had any issues.

-Jake
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
While I wait on the battery I'm just cleaning up parts, one at a time. The fenders are in okay shape but have some small rust spots. The underside of the front fender looked pretty terrible but is cleaning up nicely.

IMG_5079.jpg

The front brake electrical switch that signals the brake light is bad and has fallen apart with age. I need to try to source a new one. I've found several online but need to make several measurements to ensure I get the correct one.

My next item to clean up will be the exhaust.

IMG_5077.jpg

-Jake
 

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Go to:
BoltDepot.com
or
StainlessCycle.com

Both have what you need.

there is also a complete list of all fasteners that can be sourced in the 350 Sticky Pages.

Lastly be VERY careful with Stainless (which require Anti-Seize Compound) or any other type of Allen Head Fastener.
They will allow to WAY over Torque the bolts and you can easily strip out threads. Use a Torque Wrench to prevent over tightening, and reduce the Torque by 10% when using Anti-Seize.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the heads up Yendor! I've had the same advice given to me by several friends so I guess I had better buy some more anti-seize before starting that project.

-Jake
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I took the shocks off and started to lean them up. They look to be in decent shape and it seems as if they can be disassembled or possibly rebuilt. That would be a project for another day though, for now they'll just get a thorough cleaning.

IMG_5083.jpg

The one on the left has been cleaned and looks half decent. :mrgreen:

-Jake
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Excellent, I've now got one on the way.

My new battery arrived today so it'll be put on the tender to charge while I'm out of town next week at a dualsport rally. I hope to start sorting through the electrical wiring when I return. Everything behind the headlamp looked good and I haven't found any cuts or splices done by previous owners so I "think" I'll be good to go after cleaning a few grounds/terminals.

-Jake
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I've got a boatload of small parts waiting for me at home. Having a blast at the dualsport rally but I really want to get back to work on the CL! :mrgreen:

Before I left home I removed the rear wheel and the axle bolt was froze up pretty good, I had to use a hammer/punch to remove it. It had some minor pitting in the center that kept it from coming out easily. I cleaned it up a bit and believe that it's still serviceable. Any suggestions?
IMG_5123.jpg

-Jake
 

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Just clean it up so it slides back in easily, and coat it with a thin smear of grease before putting it back together to keep it from corroding again.
 

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I really like a classic honda engine with original screwdriver head bolts. Allen heads are a fast way to know the engine has been tempered with. But to each his own, of course...
Are there any stainless fastener kits for classic japanese bikes, that would have the original-style heads?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Tampered with is good. At least I know it was maintained and not run into the ground like the ones that have every screw stripped out to where you know no maintenance was ever done to it :p.

Got most of the screws swapped out without much issue except for the starter screws which were a pain to remove due to the header pipe being in the way. All I have left to swap out are the screws and acorn nuts on the cylinder head which I'll do this afternoon.
IMG_5208.jpg

I replaced the blinker relay, turn signal bulb, and relaxed the front brake switch so now every light on the bike functions as it should. The only bulb left to replace is the turn signal indicator bulb in the tach housing and all of them will work. Now I'm contemplating using LEDs for the indicators in the tach and backlights.

I've done as much cleaning and polishing of the fenders and small parts as I'm going to for now. I plan to start working on the timing/ignition next in preparation to get the bike running.

-Jake
 

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Tampered with is good. At least I know it was maintained and not run into the ground like the ones that have every screw stripped out to where you know no maintenance was ever done to it :p.
Yes, of course, that was not what I meant. It's just that stock fasteners (in good condition) give it that original look...

I advise you to replace (at least the ones that are constantly on - rear light, contact light, lights in the gauges) the bulbs with LED ones. It really does make a difference (and they last a very long time). Some even use a LED H4 headlight. The stock charging system on all these bikes was in my opinion barely keeping up even when new. LED will only take a fraction of the power, so your battery will stay charged, even in very low RPM.
 
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