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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm changing the chain because it just looks like crap and I have no idea when the previous owner last swapped it. I'm assuming when the chain is worn (especially if it's really worn) it makes sense to do the sprockets too. My plan is to run a 17:36 instead of 17:34 - my expectation is mostly city (very local) and very little highway.

So, a few questions:
- Seems the D.I.D. 530x100L is the way go - is $44 for a chain a lot? Seem cheap?
- Any reason not to go with Outlaw Racing sprockets?
- Does my rationale - running a 36t in the back - make sense? Is it advisable for my use?
- Anything else I should swap while the wheel's off? I may take the wheels to an actual pro and have the brakes (rear) and wheel bearings inspected... just for peace of mind.

Side note: This is my first motorcycle (really don't even have a license or helmet yet), but I've been riding bikes (the ones with pedals) for 45 years and there's a surprising amount of overlap - gear ratios, truing wheels, rebuilding forks, dealing with dumb#*@& drivers...

Thanks!
 

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Just FYI, the original sprockets were 15 and 35, for a final ratio of 2.33. Sizes of 17 and 36 are close to that, at 2.12. Your rpm will be lower than stock by about 9%, with a corresponding loss of acceleration. Also, stay away from any O-ring or X-ring type chain, as it is likely to strike the clutch lifter arm.
 

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Sounds to me like you should return to the original 15 - 35 ratio to get the performance change that you are looking for.

D.I.D. chain is fine and so are Outlaw sprockets.

You should be able to check the bearings and brakes yourself. The bearings should be clean and rotate smoothly, just like bicycle bearings. They cannot be disassembled like older style bike wheel bearings but must be replaced as an inner, outer races and ball assembly. Replacement is not too difficult. Do you have service manual for the motorcycle? If not it would be a good investment.
The brakes should be clean and oil free, have at least 5mm of friction material on shoes or pads, and drum free of rust and deep scoring.
 

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It would be helpful if you included which model in your signature data; there are variations between models.
 

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I think you need a couple more posts before you can create a signature.

Good chain/sprocket advice above.

Wear is only half the equation on brakes. Especially on the drum brakes the glue that holds the friction material to the shoe will deteriorate with time. Unless you know they have been replaced it's a good idea (and relatively cheap) to install new ones.

That and a bunch of other stuff you might want to look at are covered here:

https://www.hondatwins.net/forums/6...n/16105-basic-checklist-new-you-old-bike.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thanks guys. I'm working on a '73 CB500 Four. I haven't pulled the drive gear yet, but given that it appears the rear sprocket - a 34t - isn't stock, I have no way of knowing if the drive gear is stock or not.

I have scoured the internet and can't find the specs on the O.E. gears... plenty of specs, how-tos, etc. but no definitive answer to what was stock. WintrSol, now that I've include that little detail (that it's a '73 CB500), can we (you) be certain the O.E. was 15:35?

And yeah - I need (!) to get a good svc manual. Where do you guys recommend I go for a complete manual?
Couple more questions...
- Anyone got a favorite chain tool?
- The shoes seem to be in good shape - no delaminating, scoring, etc. but, they're barely 5mm. Seems like it makes sense to do new ones now - since it's all apart (and clean!)... right?

SyKoTIR.jpg

I can "read" chainrings and cogs on a bicycle, but I don't speak motorcycle yet. Still, this looks a bit worn... like maybe 50% through its life?

k5QMhne.jpg

Thanks again guys. I really do appreciate the info (and patience) as I'm blindly digging into this old bike.
 

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OK, this section is for the DOHC twins; I don't know what was stock for the CB500/4.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ahhh... just realized my CB500 doesn't fit here. Looks like I should've asked these questions on SOHC4. Sorry guys.
 

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Links to Manuals (at Common Motor Collective)

Thanks guys. I'm working on a '73 CB500 Four. I haven't pulled the drive gear yet, but given that it appears the rear sprocket - a 34t - isn't stock, I have no way of knowing if the drive gear is stock or not.

I have scoured the internet and can't find the specs on the O.E. gears... plenty of specs, how-tos, etc. but no definitive answer to what was stock. WintrSol, now that I've include that little detail (that it's a '73 CB500), can we (you) be certain the O.E. was 15:35?

And yeah - I need (!) to get a good svc manual. Where do you guys recommend I go for a complete manual?
Couple more questions...
- Anyone got a favorite chain tool?
- The shoes seem to be in good shape - no delaminating, scoring, etc. but, they're barely 5mm. Seems like it makes sense to do new ones now - since it's all apart (and clean!)... right?

View attachment 276640

I can "read" chainrings and cogs on a bicycle, but I don't speak motorcycle yet. Still, this looks a bit worn... like maybe 50% through its life?

View attachment 276642

Thanks again guys. I really do appreciate the info (and patience) as I'm blindly digging into this old bike.


You can start with this one - the CB550F (4cyl) and CB500F (4cyl) models share a manual labled as CB550:

https://www.common-motor.com/manuals
 

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Regarding a service manual, this may be all that you need> CB500 It is in .pdf format so you can download and save.
 
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