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It appears that your right front bulb is out; the flasher unit will not blink only one bulb, which is the bulb out indication. Why that bulb is out is up to you to find.
 

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Thanks, again, Rick!! Gr8, all I needed to know. I'll swap bulbs to check if it's the bulb or a cable.

Warmest regards!
Don't forget to scrub out the socket with a good contact cleaner, like DeOxit, and make sure the ground is connected in the headlamp.
 

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Metsch,
The turn signal circuit is pretty simple. There is a black wire that powers the flasher, a gray wire that runs from the flasher to the left handlebar switch. The switch is a double throw, single pole. One side of the switch connects the gray wire to the orange (left signal). The other side of the switch connects the gray wire to the light blue (right signal). The orange (left side) and light blue (right side) are illuminated from the power supply to the ground. If the left (orange) is working proves the flasher and power supply is working. It is pretty clear the circuit is broken on the light blue (right) side. Either the ground is bad to the front right or the bulb is bad. These bulbs can look good but not make contact in the socket. I would just buy a new one.
 

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Just one question: even if the wire's bad, shouldn't the back flasher (and the instrument pannel indicator) still blink (instead of being solid)?
As I said, no, it won't; lack of flashing is the 'bulb out' indication, because there is not enough current to make the stock flasher work. If, however, you replace the stock flasher with one that is LED rated, it will continue to flash, even with a bulb out.
 

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It is pretty clear there is a wiring problem, most likely in the headlight shell. Pull the headlight out and look where the turn signal stem mounts on the inside. There should be a wire running out of the stem center. If that is the same light that was fitted at the factory it should be light blue. Make sure the wire (whatever color) is connected to the light blue coming from the left handle bar switch. Then there should be a ground ring around the stem. This needs to be connected to the green ground wire in the harness.

The dash indicator is grounded through the opposite side lights. The wiring diagram shows it connected to the orange and light blue wires. When the right side signals are turned on, power flows from the light blue side through the filliment and grounds through the filliment in the left bulbs. The light bulbs act like resistor in a circuit, the dash bulb has a higher resistance. Not enough current will go through it to light the left bulbs.

Is the bike fitted with the original bulbs and not LED? If it has LED it gets more complicated. The flasher should not be the problem. You can remove it and jumper the gray to black. This will make the lights on all the time while you trouble shoot. Also, the dash light can be removed to separate the left and right circuits.
 

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Odd that flasher doesn't flash; are you sure you have the contacts connected correctly? There is very little info on that page, but connected in reverse, it would probably do what you said.
 

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Odd that flasher doesn't flash; are you sure you have the contacts connected correctly? There is very little info on that page, but connected in reverse, it would probably do what you said.
The flasher requires a set amount of load to flash. When one bulb goes out the load is cut in half. On an old style flasher will stay on and not flash with one bulb out. This doesn't explain why it doesn't work with a LED flasher. I made this diagram of the typical Honda turn signal wiring. Even my '85 Goldwing is wired like this with these colors. The colors are: Red, Black, Gray, Orange, Light Blue and Green.
 

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This doesn't explain why it doesn't work with a LED flasher.
I guess I should have made it clear that I was referring to the LED flasher. Your drawing makes it clear why just changing the signal bulbs to LED creates problems; the indicator conducts strongly enough that both sides tend to light. I didn't want to go through the hassle of adding diodes and chopping up the indicator wiring, so I tried substituting a bidirectional LED in the indicator to prevent this, but it wouldn't light well enough, so my rear bulbs are filaments.
 

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I guess I should have made it clear that I was referring to the LED flasher. Your drawing makes it clear why just changing the signal bulbs to LED creates problems; the indicator conducts strongly enough that both sides tend to light. I didn't want to go through the hassle of adding diodes and chopping up the indicator wiring, so I tried substituting a bidirectional LED in the indicator to prevent this, but it wouldn't light well enough, so my rear bulbs are filaments.
If you can crimp the compatable bullit connectors, you can make the diode pack using 1N4001 diodes. It won't hack up the wiring. When I get some time tonight I will make a LED wiring diagram.
 

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If you can crimp the compatable bullit connectors, you can make the diode pack using 1N4001 diodes. It won't hack up the wiring. When I get some time tonight I will make a LED wiring diagram.
Unless you have no free ground terminal; then, you have to add one. Not real hard, but my headlamp is already kind of crowded, because I have a LED headlamp, and 'angel eye' LEDs in my front signals as running lights, for which I had to add contacts.
 

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This diagram includes the diodes for the dash indicator, the always on night time alternator mod and how to wire a regulator/rectifier. I don't recommend the always on night time mod. If you run with the headlight off, then the battery will overcharge.
 

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Unless you have no free ground terminal; then, you have to add one. Not real hard, but my headlamp is already kind of crowded, because I have a LED headlamp, and 'angel eye' LEDs in my front signals as running lights, for which I had to add contacts.
This mod does not take up much room. The diode pack I made is about 6 mm in diameter and 50 mm long. It has two female bullet connectors on one end a s single male bullet connector on the other end. I made a 50 mm long pigtail that has two female connectors on one end and a male on the other. In the headlight shell, removed one of the green wires from the main harness, plug the pigtail in, then plug the existing green into one of the female ends and the pig tail has an extra free ground point. I get it, there isn't much room in the headlight shell.
 

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This diagram includes the diodes for the dash indicator, the always on night time alternator mod and how to wire a regulator/rectifier. I don't recommend the always on night time mod. If you run with the headlight off, then the battery will overcharge.
I had that drawing with everything consolidated. On my bike I only used the diodes for LEDs and the R/R upgade. The headlight wiring is original.
 
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Assuming all of your lights are incandescent, ohm out the bulb in the right front socket. put the bulb back in and ohm out the wires in the headlight bucket going to the right front signal. It should be close to the bulbs measurement, if way off then the problem is in the stem or socket.
 

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Got any data on the flasher? Like, which terminal is in and which is out? If the data that came with it doesn't say, a clear close up photo could help. It is odd that an electronic flasher would do that.
It does appear that there is an open in the wiring between the turn switch and the FR bulb, or the bulb and ground. You should be able to measure near zero ohms from the output contact of the flasher to the center pin of the bulb socket with the switch set to right flash, and measure the same from the shell and engine fins or battery negative.
 

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You should be able get a cheap Voltmeter at most stores that sell auto parts, and maybe others; it doesn't have to be great, just functional. Most (if not all) have an Ohms function, which will do for continuity when set to the lowest scale. Just don't have the power on when you use it.
 

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I agree with replacing the switch. If it was my bike I would replace both front lamps just to keep the patina balanced. I have found the reproduction lights are not as high quality as the OEM Honda lamps. There is not much that can go wrong with the light. Before you change it, I would suggest swapping the wires in the headlight housing left and right and seeing if the right blinks when it is wired to the left.

The new switch is a good idea. I have a new one on my 450. For some reason the left switches are still available as new OEM. The right ones are not, I have a reproduction right switch and the housing is made out of plastic It works, kind of, there are dead spots between the head light switch positions. I have a good used Honda switch. It is on my list to rebuild it and replace the cheap plastic one.

Were you able to check the wiring to the diagram I posted? You really should get a continuity tester. They are simple to use. First put a jumper in place of the flasher, turn the engine kill switch to stop (this prevents the coils from over heating), ground one side of the test light, put the turn signal switch in right turn and start probing the light blue wires. Where it goes dead is easy to spot.

Stay with it, this is called learning.
 

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The difference in blink rate could be from a difference in bulbs; one side may draw a bit less power than the other, causing the stock flasher relay to change rates.
 
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