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Discussion Starter #1
My 1978 Hawk II has threatened to roll off the side stand in my almost level driveway numerous times. Yesterday, I turned my back for a moment and it finally succeeded. It's the stock stand, and it seems to be in good shape, with the original rubber still intact and hardly worn. Has anyone else had this problem? Any suggestions for making it less likely to happen? Here's the situation: I have a driveway that has a very slight downhill grade toward the road and a gravel surface. If I park my bike on the side stand with the bike pointed towards the road, the grade is just enough for the bike to roll forward, pivoting the side stand past the point at which the spring folds it neatly against the swingarm and laying my bike on its side. I had another bike years ago and never had that problem. Is there a way to make it less easy to move past the six o'clock position?
 

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There are 2 simple answers - first, only park on a slight uphill (point the bike toward the house instead of away) or second, leave the bike in gear so it won't roll. Few bikes have a design that prevent them from rolling off the side stand. Harleys do, the weight of the bike lifts the stand into a locked arrangement that prevents rolling... but I know of no Honda that does (though there may be). You have to make the adjustment to the situation since the bike isn't capable of it. Not to belabor, but I know you wouldn't leave your car in neutral when parked anywhere, much less on a grade.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you. The first suggestion had occurred to me of course, but it's inconvenient. The second hadn't. It's a good idea unless I've started the bike to warm it up. As to the comment about leaving my car in neutral on a grade, I wouldn't, but the grade on my driveway is barely perceptible. I was thinking more of a modification to the side stand to make it require more effort to move it past vertical.
 

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Don't have a Hawk but on my CM400 the sidestand rotates far enough past vertical that it takes significant effort to rotate it by pushing the bike. Possibly something is preventing your stand from fully extending.

Pictures?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That was the case with my last bike too, and it seems like it should be with the Hawk. It's raining buckets, so I can't take any new photos, but I'm posting a crop of a photo I took previously that shows the side stand. The bike leans toward the side stand a lot, so I think the stand is rotating as far forward as it's intended to. I confess I haven't crawled under the bike enough to investigate whether it's blocked or not.
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IMG_20200309_160056263_HDR-crop.jpg
 

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Your stand looks to be correct. Here's a couple others to compare with
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Here's an upside down shot of the kickstand mount.
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The piece at the very top is where the kickstand bolts to and the 2 straight sections are the stops. You could grind the vertical one back some so the kickstand would go further forward.
But the reality is that parking a bike even slightly downhill is a fight with gravity, a passing car on the street can create enough vibration to have the bike move very slightly forward.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you. I'll take Ancientdad's advice about putting it in gear unless I'm warming the bike up. For that, I'll have to make sure gravity is on my side. It seems like there was a high spot that the side stand on my old bike had to get over, or a detent that it had to be pushed out of that helped it stay down. I'm wary of grinding the stop because the bike already leans quite a bit and grinding the stop would effectively shorten the stand. Besides, it's a one-way street - there's no going back if it turns out to be a bad idea. At some point, I'll remove the side stand and see if there's anything that can be done that's not apparent while it's installed.
 

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My CM400E leans too much. Nothing looks worn. I just carry a small block of wood. Works perfect !
 

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My CM400E leans too much. Nothing looks worn. I just carry a small block of wood. Works perfect !
One of the problems with the side stand are the 2 ears that spread over time. You can squeeze them back together using a vise and a torch. That helps the excessive lean.
The other problem is due to never being greased/lubed the mount plate has worn a groove in it.
 

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I don't know if the "newer" ones are the same, but the late '60s to mid '70s side stand bolts have a shoulder on them and if you loosen the nut on the back, then tighten the bolt a little at a time, it draws the top of the side stand together a bit, then tighten the nut on the back and it keeps it there. It's easy to go too far so the side stand won't pivot freely, but if you go a little at a time it will reduce the lean caused by wear.
 

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It also helps if you turn the handlebars to the left when on the side stand.
 

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I originally mounted this to prevent my bike sinking off in wet grassland or even into hot/soft asphalt-road, looks like ****, works like hell !
 

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Just leave it in gear, when parked on the side stand. Never warm up your bike by letting it run at idle. Just start it and drive off. Running at idle causes unnecessary and excessive wear in the engine.
 

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Just leave it in gear, when parked on the side stand.
Absolutely agree, I said that in post #2

Never warm up your bike by letting it run at idle. Just start it and drive off. Running at idle causes unnecessary and excessive wear in the engine.
THAT depends entirely on what bike you're talking about. Might work just fine on yours, but if you advise someone with a different older Honda twin to do that and they held you accountable for that bad advice, it might cost you a few hundred dollars. And, the only way running at idle cause ANY issues is if it overheats from lack of cooling, or starves the engine of oil if idling too long on the sidestand.
 

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Warming it up on the center stand is a viable option and will probably help speed up top end oiling at startup.
 
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