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With Covid closing everything down this summer, I decided to pull out my dad's CB360T that had been sitting in the barn for nearly 40 years. Externally, it wasn't too bad with rust in some places, but no holes. The engine appears to be in great shape internally, and also has plenty of compression. Obviously it needed some cleaning up and a few parts needed replacing before I could attempt to get it running.

I replaced the throttle cables, the right hand switch (start/kill switch), both spark plugs, petcock valve, cleaned and rebuilt the carbs, and I currently have the old, rusted drive chain cut off. I set the valve clearance, the ignition timing, and I adjusted the points and the cam chain. I also confirmed that all of the fuses were good, and both spark plugs spark when turning the engine over. Everything works electronically including the starter, which doesn't have any issue turning the engine over, but I can't seem to get it to fire.

The very first time I tried to start it after making all of the previously stated adjustments, it did fire of the left side with the choke half on and the throttle open but would stall when opening the choke or releasing the throttle. The right side, however, stayed cold.

This is my first motorcycle, my first project, and I'm not sure where to go from here. Any ideas?

Thanks in advance!
 

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After 40 years of sitting the piston rings could be stuck in the grooves, so are you sure you have compression? if you could get a hold of a compression tester that would remove that as an issue.
Did you clean the carbs? Crank the engine and then pull the plugs to see if they’re wet.
while the plugs are out of the engine, put them back in the caps and lay them on top of the engine, crank the bike and see if there’s spark. Air screw setting should be about 1-1/8 turns out from lightly seated.
 

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When you cleaned the carbs did you make sure that the slow jets were clear? Did you replace all the rubber parts in the carbs with OEM Honda parts? What is the condition of the intake boots? If these are not sealing you will never get it to run correctly.
TOOLS
 

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Check points wires are not grounding inside points cover, it's a very common problem on 360's. The wires need to be tightened up in 'just right' position or it won't work. A lot of people also paint liquid tape inside of points cover (or even ordinary insulating tape temporary to check)
You really need to remove pilot jets and primary main jet discharge tubes to check all the holes are clear, the pilot jets are only about 0.012" diameter so poking with wire will almost certainly enlarge them (try very thin copper wire, maybe couple of twisted strands from an old phone charging or USB cable) You can also try soaking in white vinegar, carb cleaners don't do much for oxidised brass
 

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If only one side fires you may also have an intermittent ignition coil. The spark plug may have sparked when you check it but it may not be a strong spark or spark plug wry time. Also make sure you have every LITTLE piece of those carbs. I was having trouble getting my carbs to act right and come to find out I was missing a tiny little throttle shaft plug. You definitely want new intake boots if you have not changed them. Also google common motor collective they have really helpful videos. You may want to check out the diagnostics video it helped me out tremendously.
 

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CMC video's are often completely wrong in their instructions. I haven't checked too many but those I have checked are generally pretty bad,
 
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Also google common motor collective they have really helpful videos.
If you want to do things the proper way, you should block the CMC domain on your phone and computer. Every video I've seen of theirs has questionable methods, like using a chisel to remove cam bearings from a head that is not yet even removed from the top end of the engine. If you're going to subscribe to that, it's pointless to come here asking for advice as you'll usually find it to be contradictory to the great marketers who are not real Honda mechanics at CMC.
 
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