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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all,

This project is already mostly wrapped up, however I am coming back now to put together a project log with lots of pictures and more explanation. I'll make a post or two as I have time. Hope you enjoy coming along for the ride!

A little background first. This bike belonged to a neighbor just across the road from my family. It is a 1971 CB350K3, and he bought it new in 1972. He rode it for a few years, but put it away after he had put around 9,000 miles on it. During this time the bike picked up a few scratches, and appears to have been dropped onto the right side at some point (The brake lever is slightly bent, and the end of the right handgrip is chewed up). It must have just been tipped over and not laid down at speed because there is really no other damage. He also managed to blow out one of the original mufflers, so for a long time after the bike rode about with one original muffler and one replacement he picked up from somewhere. As far as we know (the PO's memory is a little fuzzy on this) there was no mechanical reason the bike was parked.

After it sat for many years one of the PO's sons decided he wanted to get it going again, so he did a bit of work to it and then started riding around. He put about 1,800 more miles on the bike, but at some point during this is stopped firing on the right cylinder. They played with it a little bit, but never managed to figure out why it wasn't running right, and so the bike was parked once more. This was in 1990.

Fast forward to the summer of 2019 and the bike has now been sitting in a little partially enclosed structure for nearly 30 years. It was protected from the sun, but only somewhat protected from rain and snow during this whole period. I should have taken a picture or two of how it was stored, but I never did. I do however have pictures of the bike encrusted in dust from storage, and I'll attach those to this post. Honestly it's a miracle the bike is as nice as it is looking back on how it was stored. I can't believe the seat survived having no protection from mice. A testament to how well these were made in the first place I guess.

Anyway back to the story. The PO is tired of watching the bike sit and rot away, so he asks if I'd like to take it and work out some kind of deal if I could get it running (if anyway is interested I ended up giving him a logsplitter in exchange for the bike). Obviously I said yes, and so the next day my dad and I walked over and dug it out of the shed. The tires (still the factory originals :eek:) held air, and the bike was in neutral, so I pushed it over to our garage and began a short inspection. Those of you with a good eye will notice something right away; the ignition switch can't be seen in the pictures, and the horn is just hanging there. I'll talk about that later.

Anyway, after a few pictures my sister and I (she wanted a mechanical project to work on, so she helped with the bike) pulled the spark plugs, dripped some oil in the cylinders, made sure there was oil in the crankcase, and I gently tried the kick starter. The engine turned over! This was our first major hurdle, a locked up engine would have been a different and much more involved project. As it was we stood a chance of getting the thing running without a rebuild. We screwed the spark plugs back in to keep the cylinders closed up, and then we hosed the thing down to get rid of as much dust as we could. After the bath, we started to disassemble the bike, and that first day ended with the bike sitting there minus a tank, seat, and airbox covers.
IMG_20190526_140217.jpg IMG_20190526_140226.jpg IMG_20190526_143916.jpg
 

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It's a nice survivor. Little things like the amount of fade on the top of the tank, or the bright red color of the redline area, mean the bike didn't spend nearly as much time out in the sun over the decades as many did. Looking forward to more pictures as you catch up to the present :D
 

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What an amazingly well preserved beauty. The fact that the tires and seat are as well preserved as they are as a true testament to how well it was stored. I am very intrigued to see how this turns out in your upcoming post as the 1971 model year is less documented on then the K4 and later generations.


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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
It's a nice survivor. Little things like the amount of fade on the top of the tank, or the bright red color of the redline area, mean the bike didn't spend nearly as much time out in the sun over the decades as many did. Looking forward to more pictures as you catch up to the present :D
The PO did make sure the bike was out of the sun for all the time that it sat, that's for sure. Protection from anything else though... not so much.

What an amazingly well preserved beauty. The fact that the tires and seat are as well preserved as they are as a true testament to how well it was stored. I am very intrigued to see how this turns out in your upcoming post as the 1971 model year is less documented on then the K4 and later generations.

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Wait until you see some of the pictures of how it cleaned up! The funny thing is, it really wasn't stored well at all. I'll have to grab a picture of the little structure it sat in for 30 years. It got it out of the sun, and the PO's son drained the gas, but that's really all they did to it. I still don't know how it survived so well sitting like that for so long.

Nice bike...but I wanna know what's under the cover next to it!
Ask and ye shall receive. That's my '68 Mustang hiding under there. You can see the GT hubcap just peeking out from under the cover. It's not a real GT, but I did use real GT parts on it. Here's a few older photos without the cover.

Mustang_1.jpg Mustang_2.jpg Mustang_3.jpg Mustang_4.jpg Engine_1.jpg IMG_1496.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #7
All right, project log part 2 inbound. Probably not any new information in this for the pros, but it might help a newbie.

One thing I wanted to mention first in this post that I didn't talk about in the last one is the removal of the airbox covers. The center attachment point under the chrome button on the air box pops off fairly easily. The two tabs that go into the frame at the top do not. The rubber grommets that hold the tabs were extremely hard and did not want to let go. I found it was easiest to pop the center first, and then work SLOWLY and CAREFULLY on the upper two. Once you get one of the two upper points out the other comes out pretty easily, but getting the first one can be tough. Working slowly and carefully will get them off eventually without damage.

The next task after removing the tank, seat, and side covers was to pull the carbs and airboxes. We knew that the carbs would need a rebuild after sitting, and we had no idea whether gas had been left in it or not. The airboxes are pretty easy to remove, one 10mm bolt at the top of the box that threads into the frame, one long stud that goes between both boxes and threads into brass nuts (which double as the center mount for the side covers), and one clamp on the carb boot. The black covers can be removed from the airbox by removing the long stud and releasing a tab at the top of the box. The covers can then be pulled right off. They might be a bit stiff because they fit tightly over the carb boots, but they'll pull right off. Removing the black covers is not necessary to remove the boxes, but you'll want to remove them to inspect the filter anyway, and I found removing the covers made removing the 10mm bolt a bit easier. The last step is to loosen the clamp on the carb boot and then pull the filter out and back and it should come right off the bike. Make sure you either bag and label the 10mm bolt or thread it back into the frame so it's not lost.

Fuel&Air.jpg Airbox.jpg

After some cleaning, I decided that my stock airboxes were in decent shape, so they went back on as is. I will probably pull them later and replace the element with foam, but they're working fine for now.

Once the airboxes were off the next step was to remove the carbs. The carbs are held onto the engine by the intake manifolds, just loosen a clamp and give them a yank and they'll pop off. To remove them completely you need to detach the throttle cables and the choke bracket. I found that it was much easier to do both of these things once the carbs were out of the manifolds. To remove the choke bracket, just loosen the bolt that connects to the choke bracket on the left carb. Once the bolt is loose you can just pop the bracket right off the carb. No reason to remove it from the right carb.

Choke_Bracket.jpg

To remove the throttle cables remove the adjuster bracket with a screw driver and then you can rotate the carb and cable around to allow the cable to slip through the slot in the mounting point on the throttle shaft.

Throttle_Cable_1.jpg Throttle_Cable_2.jpg

Pull the fuel lines off and the carbs will be free! Just be warned, sometimes the fuel nipples can pull out of the carb body along with the fuel line. This isn't a big deal, one of mine did it. I'll talk about how to address this later.

We did a bit of looking once we had the carbs and tank off. The PO's son had used some kind of tank liner that was still holding up well, so we left that alone. It also looks like he drained the fuel from the tank and carbs before parking it. This was an extremely good idea, our carbs were really pretty clean on the inside because of this. If you are going to store a bike for a long time, DRAIN THE FUEL!!! Not just from the tank, make sure the carbs are dry as well. If you drain everything it will sit happily for years with no damage. If you don't, you'll have a pretty gruesome fuel system clean / rebuild in your future.

At this point the intake manifolds were removed to check them from pliability and cracks. They were actually in good shape, so they went right back on. If you have any doubts, replace them. They can cause some weird / tough to diagnose vacuum and lean running issues. To end the day we stuffed a clean shop rag in each intake manifold to keep junk out of the cylinders. This is a good idea to keep things protected, but don't forget they're there when you reassemble!
 

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Great write up! I'm in the process of "refreshing" a friend's CB350 and went thru the carb removal and rebuild process just last week. Yes, it can be a real pain to remove and replace the plastic side covers without damaging the tabs. I've always tried to remember to squirt some silicone spray or WD40 on the mounting grommets before pulling things apart - it usually helps to make them more compliant. I know it's tempting to purchase cheap carb rebuild kits online, but do your best to clean and reuse all the brass jets that are already in the carbs. They're almost always better quality, and it's less expensive to simply buy the gaskets you need to reassemble the carbs. My carbs were in pretty good shape and came very clean after a day's soak in Simple Green, followed by spraying thru all the ports with aerosol carb cleaner and compressed air. I even managed to get the corroded chrome caps pretty presentable using some 0000 steel wool followed by chrome polish.
IMG_0566.jpg IMG_0567.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Alright, short entry today.

With the carbs off I packed them up and sent them off with my sister and dad to get rebuilt. Between the various configurations the Mustang has been in and all the small engines we have around, I have rebuilt my fair share of carbs, so I was happy to hand these off. My dad rebuilt one carb with my sister, and then let her rebuild the other on her own. They reused all the original brass parts, tested the slides, and did a bench sync. I had warned them about the felt washers on the throttle shaft before they soaked the carbs, so we were able to avoid drying them out and causing a vacuum leak. I don't have many details on the rebuild process because I did not participate, but one tip I have for people new to carbs is to pick up a cleaning kit for paint guns. They have lots of little wires and bore brushes that are perfect for the tiny passages in a carburetor. Soaking in carb cleaner and blowing out with compressed air is good, but you don't always get everything out that way.

While they were working on that my task was to start cleaning up the bike and some of the parts we took off. First I just wiped everything down with soapy water to get rid of years of dust and grease. The next step for the seat was to use a vinyl cleaner on the seat. I used an old cut-up T-shirt to apply the cleaner. I did this a few times to make the seat shine and make the soften up a bit. The cleaner was followed up with several applications of a vinyl conditioner / protector, also using an old T-shirt. Pretty straightforward, but it really helped the seat. We also got lucky that the seat pan was not rusted out.

To clean up the side covers and the tank I started with some rubbing compound just working slowly and really rubbing it in. After the rubbing compound I can back with polish and did the same as the rubbing compound, working slowly and really rubbing in in. I finished it all off with a coat of wax and then came back and hit the chrome trim and badges with a cleaner wax. I think it all came out pretty well. It's the best I can do without having a real buffer, and there is no way we were going to lose the original paint because it's just too nice.

Cleaned_Cover.jpg IMG_20190527_150922_1560699283473.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Great write up! I'm in the process of "refreshing" a friend's CB350 and went thru the carb removal and rebuild process just last week. Yes, it can be a real pain to remove and replace the plastic side covers without damaging the tabs. I've always tried to remember to squirt some silicone spray or WD40 on the mounting grommets before pulling things apart - it usually helps to make them more compliant. I know it's tempting to purchase cheap carb rebuild kits online, but do your best to clean and reuse all the brass jets that are already in the carbs. They're almost always better quality, and it's less expensive to simply buy the gaskets you need to reassemble the carbs. My carbs were in pretty good shape and came very clean after a day's soak in Simple Green, followed by spraying thru all the ports with aerosol carb cleaner and compressed air. I even managed to get the corroded chrome caps pretty presentable using some 0000 steel wool followed by chrome polish.
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Thanks Pops, I appreciate it. Hopefully it can help someone one day. You got those carbs looking great! Our came out really nice as well. I was really surprised how well my dad and sister got the chrome caps to clean up despite all the dust and pitting.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
The next task for me after doing some cleanup on the bike was to sort out the ignition system. The PO's son had put brand new points on the bike back in the 90's when he was trying to troubleshoot the dead cylinder. Given that the bike barely ran that way we were able to get away running those points because they were basically brand new! the PO also had an old set of points, so we are keeping those around as a backup. With the points sorted out I started working on the est of the system. We had ordered new coils and a condenser from CMC, so we had the new parts ready to go, but I could not figure out how to mount the coils. If you go back to the first post in this build thread you'll see the dusty dirty pictures there and the eagle eyed will notice something. You cannot see the ignition switch and the horn is just hanging on the other side of the bike. The PO's son must have removed the coil bracket while troubleshooting and never put it back on.

Once I figured out exactly what was missing (thanks 66Sprint) I knew what to look for. A quick look on ebay determined that I could get the assembly pretty easily, but I wanted to look for the original before I spent any money. I walked over to the PO's house and explained what I needed. After about 20 minutes of digging through his shed I found the whole assembly, bracket, coils, and condenser! Coils actually looked to be in excellent shape, so I will hold on to them as backups. I removed all the old electronics and replaced them with the new ones because we had them. The wiring on the CMC coils is identical to the stock coils, but the wire colors are different, so you have to be careful when connecting them. The biggest differences were both coil wires were blue, and the condenser wires were red. As far as I can tell it really doesn't matter which condenser goes to which coil, so the red wires aren't a problem, however both coils having blue wires means you have to be careful when connecting to the points to make sure you attach the HT lead to the same cylinder whose point is connected to the coil.

Original_Coils.jpg New_Coils.jpg

Next step was to mount it all up on the bike. I was exceptionally fortunate that the PO's son had kept everything together when he took the coils bracket off, which meant the only fastener I had to replace was one single M6 bolt. Really glad I didn't have to replace the spacers. Mounting everything up was pretty easy, and the horn, ignition switch, and flasher module were finally back where they belonged.

Now that the ignition system was in working order the next step was to test the rest of the electronics. I hooked up a spare ATV battery, checked the metric fuse, and everything worked except for the hand brake switch! The flashers both worked, but flashed very slowly, so we added a flasher module to the list of parts. The hand brake switch wasn't working because the wire was broken off right at the perch.

Last step was to check for spark. I spent a long time kicking the bike and using the starter looking for a spark. Nothing, completely dead on both sides. I broke out the multimeter and started tracing the system looking for power. It took me far too long to figure out why I had power at the points but not at the coils.... If you want to check spark, make sure the kill switch is on :mad:!

The text in red is incorrect as 66Sprint states below. There was no power anywhere in the ignition system
 

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It took me far too long to figure out why I had power at the points but not at the coils.... If you want to check spark, make sure the kill switch is on :mad:!
The phrase NOW in blue is impossible....The B+ power HAS to run through the coils to get to the points, and the coils get it through the "kill" switch.....

So if Kill is off, NO POWER AT COILS OR AT POINTS....
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
The phrase NOW in blue is impossible....The B+ power HAS to run through the coils to get to the points, and the coils get it through the "kill" switch.....

So if Kill is off, NO POWER AT COILS OR AT POINTS....
Yeah you're right now that I look at my wiring diagram again. There lies the issue with doing a retroactive project log, the details aren't fresh in my mind. I bet what I was thinking of was seeing power at the points after I turned the switch back on.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Okay, so at this point just to recap:

  • The whole electrical system works with the exception of the front brake switch
  • The engine turns over
  • The bike has been cleaned up a bit, lots of dirt, dust, and grease had accumulated over the years
  • The carbs are with my dad and sister for a deep clean and new seals
  • The tank / sidecovers have been cleaned up and polished / waxed, and the seat has been treated with vinyl cleaner and conditioner. Everything is looking awesome!
Okay, so at this point the next task for me was to drain the old oil, clean the sludge out of the centrifugal filter, and refill with clean 10W-40. This is also where the first real problems appeared. The first big issue was getting the oil filter cover off. As many of you know, the JIS screws are not very tolerant of Phillips bits, especially when they are stuck. Add to that years of the PO and his son using phillips bit on the screws already, and you get quite a mess. My method to get out really stuck screws was to take a 1/4" ratchet drive, put the appropriate sized socket in (also 1/4" I think) and the slide a screwdriver bit into the socket. This let me put lots of force directly down on the screw, and I could also regulate the amount of torque I applied much better. This method only failed on one of the six screws I used it on. As I learned later with this bike, an impact driver is the way to go, but if you need to get a screw out and don't have an impact driver this worked pretty well too. The mangled screw really wasn't an issue because we had already planned on replacing the fasteners with stainless steel allen head bolts. There were already some pre-boogered screws from the PO and his son that needed replacing as well.

I hate drilling out screws, but this one wasn't actually too bad. One of the few times I've actually been able to use an easy-out successfully. With that last screw out I popped the oil filter cover off and found a nice little surprise. Most of the retaining groove for the snap ring on the filter was cracked and barely hanging on. I discovered this when I went in with a small screwdriver to scrape out the sludge and part of the filter came out with it. No idea how this happened, over pressure in the oil system? Bad casting from the factory? PO / PO's son screwed up? Doesn't really matter I guess, just curious as to what caused it.

Here's a few photos of what I saw after I pulled the busted bits out. I knew I would have to pull the filter to replace it, and I didn't want to loose any pieces in the engine, so I pulled the loose bits before pulling the filter.

Broken_Filter_3.jpg Broken_Filter_4.jpg Filter_Bits.jpg

Anyway I hopped on eBay and found a replacement pretty easily. Ordered it up and started the waiting game. I also bought the special tool you need to remove the filter, and had to wait on that too. As you can see in the photos, I kept the pieces I took out so that I could match them up to the filter to ensure that I had removed everything and didn't lose things in the engine. As long as the rest of the filter body was in good shape, I could have technically reused it. It's pretty clear when you look at how the assembly is put together that the rotor in the filter can't actually go anywhere, so the snap ring isn't needed to retain the rotor. As I was told by 66Sprint, the purpose of the snap ring is to act as a stop for the rotor in the case of an over pressure situation in the oiling system. Without the snap ring the rotor would be free to move with the spring loaded part on the cover, meaning that there is no way oil pressure could be relieved. So to finally get to the point, the filter can technically work without the snap ring, it will continue to function without issue, however you risk other parts in your engine in the case of an over pressure.

On a side note, when you pull the oil filter cover, make sure you pay attention to the orientation. It can line up in three different places due to the evenly spaced screw holes, however there is only ONE correct orientation. The picture below shows the correct orientation.

Filter_Cover_2.jpg

It's a good idea to draw a line across the gap between the case and cover before you pull it to help you line it up. Putting the cover back on in the wrong orientation will cut off oil to the top end, making for a pretty quick and ugly engine death. This is one of the few thing I have seen on the bike that really does seem poorly designed, the holes on this cover should not be evenly spaced. They should be spaced out such that they can still apply the appropriate clamping force, but can only be lined up in one orientation. With a little bit of care and attention it's not a problem, but the consequences for making a small mistake are pretty bad. I'm not a huge fan of the CB360 design which requires pulling the whole right case, but at least you can't screw that one up. Just seems like a really simple solution and given the quality, skill, and attention to detail displayed in most of the engine It surprises me that this was overlooked on a fairly critical part. If it was a part that was never or rarely removed then it wouldn't be a big deal, but given how often this cover will be pulled if you're performing maintenance at the recommended intervals it is kind of a problem. Sorry, rant over.
 

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YES, you should replace the damaged oil filter rotor, but WHERE is the oil filter cap? (the piece the snap ring retains shown as Part #10 in the fiche page below)......The oil won't get past there if it is missing, it will simply dump back into the sump and MOST of the engine will not be lubricated......
Please tell me you removed it, and have it, but just didn't photograph it.......



honda-cb350k3-e-9-oil-filter-oil-pump_big3IMG01175415_eeb7.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #17
YES, you should replace the damaged oil filter rotor, but WHERE is the oil filter cap? (the piece the snap ring retains shown as Part #10 in the fiche page below)......The oil won't get past there if it is missing, it will simply dump back into the sump and MOST of the engine will not be lubricated......
Please tell me you removed it, and have it, but just didn't photograph it.......
Yes I do have the rotor (oil filter cap), I had just removed it and not pictured it. The replacement filter cup I purchased came with a new rotor, nut, thick spacer washer, snap ring, and the tab lock washer. Rest assured the whole assembly is back together the way it's supposed to be with unbroken parts.

Might be a bit confusing, but this whole project log is retroactive, so I've actually already replaced the filter and have been riding a bit. This thread is just to catalogue the work that was done. That's why I occasionally make mistakes (like the power to points but not coils in my last post) because the information is not fresh in my mind. I'll address the installation of the new filter in a future post, probably the next one.
 

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That's why I occasionally make mistakes (like the power to points but not coils in my last post) because the information is not fresh in my mind.
That'll teach you... :lol: next build, do a project log right from the start!
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Okay, this thread is going to take a turn here. I am probably not going to finish the description of reassembly due to recent events.

A bit of backstory first. I rode the bike quite a bit this weekend and was having a very good time. About 100 miles in after we got it ride-able the first issue appeared. The bike would not rev past 5k at all. It was bizarre, almost like a rev limiter. The engine would just break up and miss above 5k, but it would idle and rev up to 5k perfectly. This left me on the side of the road and my family trailered the bike back to the cabin. My first thought was an issue with the mechanical advance, so I opened stuff up, cleaned and lubed the advance mechanism, and then reassembled / retimed. The bike seemed to run and rev fine. Took it out on the same ride that had killed it the first time and it made it the whole way around.

I took it out to town the next day. ran fine on the way there. Had a nice ride on a nice day. On the way back the same issue cropped up just as I entered a curve. This is where things get fuzzy. I remember the bike cutting out and the sudden deceleration in the curve caused me to go down on the low side at about 40 mph. I remember sliding with my head up and coming to a stop and not quite understanding what had happened.

Fortunately for me and the machine the side of the road we ended up on was composed of about 1 foot of class V gravel and loose dirt / plants past that. Both the bike and I slid to a stop on our own, no hard objects were hit. The bike did not land on me or pin me underneath it. I was wearing a good helmet, riding gloves, jeans, and a thick flannel shirt. My head never hit the ground, so no idea how well the helmet would have worked. Pretty glad I didn't have to find out. The jeans did a great job protecting my legs, only bruises there. The flannel did well until the buttons ripped off. At that point I slid on my skin. Pretty minor road rash, nothing more than a big scrape really. Gloves did a good job, they had padded knuckles. All in all I ended up with a few bruises, two very sore shoulders, and a bit of road rash on my left arm. I count myself very lucky indeed. I'll add a picture of my road rash below for those that may care to see.

Now to the bike. I don't have any pictures of it for now. I was pretty shaken up at the time and I am now many miles away and will be for a while. The damage I remember was mostly around the headlight / clocks. Headlight bulb was destroyed, no glass left. Headlight bucket was cracked, maybe salvageable with some epoxy on the inside, maybe not. The little ear brackets on either side of the bucket are bent. Slight bend in the front of the fender. Small dent in tank. Not much for scrapped paint. Speedo was stuck at 40 mph, tach still worked. The bike ran once I pushed it out of the ditch and I rode it home. Not a good choice I realize, but at the time the only thing I could think to do was get me and the bike home. All in all it seems like the bike can be repaired. My biggest concern at this time is potentially bent forks and what is causing the intermittent ignition issue. The way the bike slid I don't think the forks are bent, but I will certainly have to look into that.

As near as I have been able to piece together this is sequence of events that happened:

  1. Normal riding, see a curve coming up
  2. Bike beings to pop and spit as I enter the curve
  3. Bike either cuts out or I hit the kill switch (will discuss below)
  4. Rapid deceleration
  5. Bik goes down on the low side and slides out in front of me
  6. Both me and the bike come to a stop
Now I am honestly unsure whether I hit the kill switch or not. All I know is the bike cut out completely and when I picked the bike up the switch was off. I do not remember hitting the switch, but it got flipped at some point. Perhaps I hit it by accident, or maybe I panicked in the moment and hit it. I am a very new rider, so either of these is possible. Me laying the bike down is definitely a combination of an ignition issue, inexperience, and too much speed. My speed was not unreasonable for the curve, but given my very limited experience perhaps a lower speed would have let me recover.

All I can do at this point is take away the lessons learned, be extremely grateful I walked away essentially unscathed, repair / replace damaged parts, and figure out what is happening with the ignition. Only thing I can think of is that oil coated the points and caused them to not conduct electricity properly. There was a little bit of oil in the points cover when I worked on the advance mechanism. Could just be cheap Chinese points too, we have no idea what the PO's son used all those years ago. This has definitely been a motivating experience for me to design an electronic ignition system for this bike as my senior design project. Lot of failed examples out there to learn from.

Sorry for the long post, had a lot to say I guess. This has not scared me into giving up on motorcycles or this cb350. I am learning from this and I will apply the lessons in the future. I will be taking a break for a while though. I need some time to recover, and then there is school and work to get in the way as well. I'll probably pick the bike up again over the winter, and hopefully I can have it ready to ride next season. I will come back to this thread to post photos of the damage to the bike next time I am near the bike.

On a side note, ancientdad you'll be happy to hear that I'll be continuing my project log in real time as I work through the repairs. Seems like you can pull some universal strings :eek:, I'll remember that next time I do a project! If I don't do my project log on time the world will force me to!:lol:

IMG_20190903_171959.jpg
 

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Glad you are ok after your spill!

As far as my history with any Honda Twin with similar symptoms as you described above, here are some things I have seen happen on my bikes over the years.

1. Battery not secure, or + terminal not covered and touches/grounds out under seat pan on bends.
2. Carb floats set too low and running out of fuel especially around bends.
3. Fuel cap vent blocked causing fuel flow to burp causing poor fuel flow to carbs. Check by opening cap while engine is acting up at speed if this is the case, the engine will suddenly be back to normal power, but be careful riding with one hand!
4. Poor battery strength. The Honda Twins must have a strong battery or they will not run properly....ever!
5. Check both carb vents on the sides of the carb body. I have seen one side clogged.
 
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