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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think (HOPEFULLY!!!!!!!)( I have found the perfect boxed aluminum swingarm for my
CB200T Mini-Cafe project!
This damned thing better fit! :lol:
I'm pretty sure these lil' bikes were never sold here in the US, but I hope to
implement some of its components onto my '74 200T.
Here is a pic of the swingarm of which........................................
I WILL OUT-BID EVERY ONE OF YOU F.................................. (Sorry, got carried away). :p
 

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Must be a non-US model for sure...Never heard of it...... Let us know if the conversion works!
 

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inline4 said:
I think (HOPEFULLY!!!!!!!)( I have found the perfect boxed aluminum swingarm for my
CB200T Mini-Cafe project!
This damned thing better fit! :lol:
I'm pretty sure these lil' bikes were never sold here in the US, but I hope to
implement some of its components onto my '74 200T.
Here is a pic of the swingarm of which........................................
I WILL OUT-BID EVERY ONE OF YOU F.................................. (Sorry, got carried away). :p
I don't know about the street legal versions - but I used to be an MSF instructor and the trainer bikes provided by honda were CB125T

They had an extra light bar so the instructor could see what gear you were in and a couple other functions that I don't recall.

I know they (the trainer models) weren't required to meet emissions standards and couldn't be titled for street use. They did make excellent trainer bikes though.

Ernie
 

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Either of you have a pic of the whole bike?......
 

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oops sorry about the big pic - the one pictured isn't a trainer but the ones we used looked very much like this one.
 

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It's a close, close brother of the CG125. Honda had, and still has two factories for the CG125. One is in China, the other is in Brazil. They've been making the motorcycle since the 1960's, and it's shipped all over South America, Africa, and some of the poorest countries in the world. Reason being is that it's a completely outdated but effective UJM (universal Japanese motorcycle).

Honda was one of the first to take their production into China under their own factory. The Chinese are very, very capable of producing good quality, but the factory must be owned and maintained by an outside source. General factories within China which are Government owned either wholly or in part are the ones which produce trash. Needless to say, Yamaha followed them not long after, and built their Chinese factory (and also one in Brazil) across the street from Honda (in both locations), and Yamaha began the production of the YBR125.

We were one of the first companies in the USA to go to China, and start our production in the motorcycle business as well. Once Honda had Chinese workers, other factories began copying the CG125, and it quickly became the most popular motorcycle in China, South America, and Africa. We went to China, got a factory (ShangHai EkChor Public) and put several different names on the motorcycle depending on where we were sending it to. The model we sent to South America and Africa was the Kumoto CG125, but the model sold in China as the Xing Fu XF125, etc., etc.

It was a great business until the mid 1990's, and when the South American Peso crashed, so did the business. The echos of that crash went all the way to Africa (they were doing trading at the time between each other), so the largest customers dropped. Reason being that when the South American Peso crashed, that motorcycle, even though we sold it for the same amount, it increased in cost to the retail buyer by almost 400%. Business over.

Anybody who has a 125cc Honda with the model CB, CG, etc, I have a lot of parts left. They are in Miami and were waiting shipment when the business crashed, but I'm toying with the idea of bringing them back and Ebaying the parts. There are 10 crates of parts which were supposed to be loaded into a container and shipped to Brazil, but they never made the boat, and they are still there. I believe the inventory is in the $200,000 mark, but I can't be sure of the actual number. Frames, engine cases, carbs, lights, chain guards, seats, cables, pistons, mufflers, head pipes, instrument clusters...you name it, the parts are there.

The main difference between the CB and the CG is really the "look design". The seats, tanks, and plastics, and wheels are not interchangeable. The CG125 had the longer, flatter seat, spoke wheels, longer standard gas tank, and very little plastic. However, several other parts are completely interchangeable. Just looking at the pic, I know for a fact the instrument cluster, forks, handlebars, controls and mirrors are interchangeable, and I've got probably 250 pistons which I would bet are a direct match up.

Sorry about the long post, but I just found it interesting that we stumbled upon this, and it was a pretty large part of my life. Anybody want some Honda 125 parts, let me know. I probably have enough parts to fully assemble a few motorcycles, but there would still be a LOT of parts left over.
 

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That's very interesting I always wondered what the deal was with these.

Students liked 'em and were always asking where they could buy one.

I and other instructors thought they were purpose built for the course.

That wouldn't have been very practicle in hindsight.

In addition to having the extra light bar all the trainer models I saw were red
with a black engine and exhaust and no striping or other adornments.

We also used some 200 Twin stars and I always prefered demoing the exercises on
the 125s they were excelent for low speed manuvering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Nathan that was one helluva post!
Thanks for your input, and if this swingarm bolts up to my CB200T w/o a lot of hassle
then just imagine the possibilities. :mrgreen:
Jim
 

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Thank you Jim, I appreciate that. As I said, it was an extremely long and large part of my life (although I was extremely young at the time), and I remember a lot of details. Mainly because now in my current position, I still deal with some of those very same customers, although some have disappeared, never to return. I am planning a trip to China soon, in hopes of purchasing the YBR125 directly from the Yamaha of China factory (from the back door, of course) for export into Russia, Angola, and Columbia. Keep your fingers crossed for me!

Regarding the swingarm swap you're talking about, I'm afraid that I can't be of much help. I haven't seen those bikes in complete condition for years, and I'm not familiar with your model. However, what I can tell you is:

-The CG125 was a rear dual-shock bike, similar to the older, larger CB line. This was one of the main cosmetic and comfort differences between the CG125 and the CB125 (besides tank and plastics)

-The CG125 rear swingarm was possibly a little longer, definitely a bit skinnier and thinner, and wouldn't have been quite as beefy as the CB125 swingarm.

I know that probably doesn't help you much in this case, but it's all I've got. Good luck!
 

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Theres something dorky about square headlamps and clocks :?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
leethal said:
Theres something dorky about square headlamps and clocks :?
I agree with you on that point.

Anyway, some disappointment with the arrival of the CB125T swingarm. It is 3 inches longer than
the 200 arm and weighs about THREE TIMES AS MUCH!!!! :(
Unfortunately it is made of steel instead of aluminum.
Oh well, another swingarm for my constantly growing collection. :roll:
 

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If you want to get rid of it, try to Ebay it, but your best bet is to post it as "sell worldwide", "will ship worldwide", and make the listing in both english and spanish. You won't get much money for it, but I suppose it's possible to get your money back, and it will leave your collection. Mexico City (which isn't too far) purchased thousands and thousands of those bikes, and I'd say it's probably your best bet of selling it there.
 
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