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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Folks!

I recently purchased a 1974 CL200 with what appears to be low mileage (I say it that way because I cannot tell if the speedo/odo on it now was the original). Sometime next fall I plan to start a cafe project using this bike as my base.

I read in two old websites ("old" meaning not kept up and therefore no way of verifying the posts) that early 200s had an oil pump problem or perhaps a recall. I cannot verify these statements anywhere, so they may just have been erroneous or mistaken reports. But, I wanted to ask if any else has heard of this? If so, is there any information out there on how to check the oil pump to see if it is one that needs to be replaced? Perhaps the oil pump body is different on the good oil pump and the bad oil pump? Maybe with engine numbers?

Any insight would be welcomed. For example, if there is a reader of this site who was working in a Honda shop in 1974 [hey, it could happen :-D ] and they have no memory of any 200 twin recalls, I am willing to set aside the posts I read as erroneous. Alternatively, if someone does remember it happened, any insight you have on the affected units, replacement pumps, etc., would be most welcome.

Thanks all!
 

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I have no knowledge of any recalls regarding CB200 oil pumps. Never heard of a CB200 with a bad one, either.
Their oil pump is no different than any of the other Honda twins of the era.
The CB360 started a different kind of oil pump, but the CB200 is a standard piston type, producing good flow but almost zero oil pressure..........

Here's the manual, it will give the specs -

http://home.comcast.net/~tbpmusic3/HondaCB_CL200.pdf
 

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Sensei
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Actually, the "trick" racing pump used in f-160 racers is the stock 160 or 175 pump, bored out to use the bigger 200 piston........Almost all the oiling failures (on the smaller twins) I've seen were caused by either a bad oil pump gasket/seal to the passages, bad pressure joint at the centrifugal filter, or an actual blockage in the passages due to overusing silicon sealant.... NEVER by pump failure (Not to say it couldn't happen, but....)
Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hmm, OK. Yea, these pumps are pretty simple, basically being the pump body with the piston and the inlet/outlet check valves. I was wondering when I read about the supposed failures what they could be, other than simply a few bad castings or improperly machined bodies, maybe (or maybe even accidentally assembling a 175 pump piston in a 200 body during the model switch-over on the assembly line from the 175 to the 200, which wouldn't create the needed vacuum to draw the oil into the pump). This is me just thinking in random; I have no evidence to back it up.

I realized I would feel better if I checked the condition of the shift forks, shift drum, and tranny gears anyway, so .... what the heck, I will be taking it down to the bare cases. I would be *REALLY* annoyed at myself if I had the whole project done and after riding the bike a few miles I discovered there was a transmission problem. Better the to check this winter.

So, I will pay extra attention to the oil pump condition, including its ability to "suck" when the plunger (piston) is pulled. I have a vague memory that the oil pump gaskets (oil pump-to-case gasket) on the 160s/175s, and so I assume the 200s as well, was a very thin, precise gasket, that was not supposed to be used with any kind of sealer. Sounds right?

I have also decided to see if I can come up with a relatively cheap parts bike (with a complete bottom end - or maybe just a whole bottom end if that is what I find), including the oil pump, from a later year 200 ('75 or later) and see if I can see any difference. One of the fortunate things I have is a little time to collect parts ;)

Well, if anyone has any further thoughts on the matter, keep me informed. Many thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I meant to ask 66Sprint:
By "bad pressure joint at the centrifugal filter", do you mean the part of the centrifugal filter that fits into the middle of the filter on the crank end, but stays with the part of the filter that comes out when you remove the filter cover from the LH engine case? It has a spring fitting (a spring behind the bit that is supposed to fit snugly into the center of the centrifugal filter that stays on the crank, the piece that also can be pulled out to clean the filter's interior and has an o-ring around the edge if you want)? I want to make sure I don't make a known mistake by oversight .... :oops:
 

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Sensei
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Yes,...... I am discussing the spring loaded steel "cup" with an "hourglass" shaped hole in it that fits/seals against the brass insert of the part Honda calls a "cap" (the part with the spinner "vanes" that you remove to get to the notched nut that holds the centrifugal filter on the crank end...)....Excessive clearance or lack of full pressure here allows some/more of the pumped oil to "drop" directly back into the sump rather than travel to the top end, crank, or transmission..... For this reason, one has to be careful NOT to use a case gasket that is too thick...... (BUY the correct gasket for this)..... For the same reasons, the oil pump gasket MUST seal fully...a small tear or leak will also reduce the pressure and flow rate....
On the 'full" racers, we by-pass this problem by plumbing in an oil cooler and NOT using the centrifugal filter..... Since the oil gets changed regularly and after only a few miles of racing, no filter is not a major problem...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
66Sprint:

OK, thanks. By chance, do you know where I can get an oil flow diagram/chart for the 200? I have seen them for other bikes, but have not seen one for the CB/CL 200s. If one was never available from Honda, maybe one of the 160/175 racers produced one for for their twins, and it would apply to the 200 as well?
 
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