Honda Twins banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Could someone recommend a good chain breaker/rivet tool for a cam chain? I've had the engine for a while and had no time or money to spend on it. Now I'm ready to break everything down and see what I'll need parts wise. I broke an extractor pin on a tool I bought online, similar to the Motion Pro product. Probably should have ground the pins down first. Had it half way out when it popped. Forgive me if I post some things the wrong way. I'm relatively familiar with computers, but not with venues, forums such as this. I've been a member since August 2018, and haven't posted much but check in to read the posts periodically. When I get something going I'll have lots of posts and pictures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,085 Posts
I bought the Stockton chain tool through Amazon but I wasn't very happy with it, and I believe it's very similar to, if not the same, as the Motion Pro. I usually grind off the heads of the link pins first, then the tool will push it out pretty easily. If your engine turns over (which I assume is a 450, but you didn't say and that's always helpful), you should look for the previous staked link (or pressed-on link plate, as some are). It will look different than the rest, and will come apart there more easily
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yes its a '72 K5 CB450. I think I remember seeing the Stockton tool. I may just try to get another extractor to replace the one I broke and grind the pins before pressing. The one I pressed is half way out. I guess it will be ok to spin it looking for the staked master link. Maybe the tool I have will be sufficient to stake the new link when I get there. Thanks for the quick reply. I have to sign off for now. May be back on tonight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
339 Posts
If you grind the pins down flush you should be able to break it with a screwdriver or chisel, just pry /tap the plate off

Sent from my SM-J320V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,085 Posts
I wouldn't rotate the engine with a link pin pushed halfway out - last thing you need is for it to come apart while you're turning it over and bend a valve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,085 Posts
Honestly, the box and components look similar to my Stockton. The main body of mine is steel and most of the parts are fine, but the tip to break the chain is softer steel than is required to do the job right more than once - literally, mine worked great once, then the tip was slightly bent and got worse the next use. I ended up using the breaker tip for the staking tip by grinding it to s semi-blunt point and I manually break the chains now by grinding off the link pin heads and gently punching out the link. This one is also cheaper than I paid for the Stockton. Hopefully the tips are made of better steel in this one. Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Perhaps if the basic tool body is OK it's worthwhile me buying it and then making up some better quality tips - I've sometimes machined old allen keys to replace small punch tools though this isn't something you should have to do with a brand-new tool. Maybe even silver steel (drill rod) hardened and tempered would be better. Or even see if the original tools would properly harden.

This all reminds me of a Chinese brake flaring kit I bought a few years ago - I ended up making all new dies for it and it was still not good enough because there was too much wobble in the threaded spindle. It deformend about 7 out of 10 flares. In the end I bought a UK-made Sykes Pickavant tool and it produces effortless and perfect flares every time.

EDIT: I ordered one of the generic Chinese tool kits (same as the Stockton). It has its faults, but worked pretty well and at least all of the parts are steel. The main problem with mine was that the cam chain pin jammed in the anvil as it was being pushed out - it got about half way and I could feel the increased resistance. When I investigated further the bore tapers so needs to be drilled out. The threads are a little on the slack side but I greased everything before use and it was fine. The tool's driver pin got a little mushroomed at the end and I don't think it would last for repeated work so I'll machine up a replacement out of something more durable. The rivet tool may be better with the ball-end removed, the end drilled out and a ball-bearing pressed in.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top