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Discussion Starter #1
With 97k miles on my 1974 CL450K6, the front brake drum is wearing thin. I call the drum the portion of the wheel to which the spokes are attached. I'll see tomorrow if it is showing any aluminum though the steel. New brake shoes don't fill in the gap and both brake arms track over 45 degrees until the shoes make contact. Things are just worn out.

Has anyone built up wheel linings with 1/16" or thinner steel? I'm thinking of purchasing 2.5' of steel, maybe 1" wide, bend into a 10" diameter hoop, drill holes through it, then mount inside the wheel and weld to the wheel at the holes and at the ends. Use an angle grinder to smooth the welded holes out. The steel/aluminum that exists would be a heat sink for the new steel lining weld spots. Thoughts?
 

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Well for 523 Euros plus shipping you can have a new one:
https://www.cmsnl.com/honda-cl450k6-usa_model50476/hub-front-wheel_44601292010/#.XSLD1lMpCdM

For $63 and nearly $100 shipping (depending on your location I suppose)
There is this low mileage example:
https://www.ebay.com/i/253625685055?chn=ps&norover=1&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-117182-37290-0&mkcid=2&itemid=253625685055&targetid=596465943308&device=m&adtype=pla&googleloc=9001888&poi=&campaignid=1689407495&adgroupid=74365778388&rlsatarget=pla-596465943308&abcId=1140476&merchantid=6296724&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIyaGXwLqk4wIVGoGzCh3jGQ-bEAkYBCABEgLW1_D_BwE

And if you have a look here and scroll down there is a list of other bikes the same hub was used on which includes CB450 K1 and K2, CL72 and CL77
https://www.partzilla.com/product/honda/44601-292-010?ref=4ec8760847fdde688093ae34bdf0758e225d33af

I've never heard of relining a brake hub as you've described, but I'm sure the correct part can be made. I'd assume the relining process would be similar to replacing a cylinder sleeve. I remember reading how Alan Millyard created a 4LS front hub from scratch for a replica Honda racer, he added his own iron brake linings to a fabricated hub so it certainly can be done.
 

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Your way will not work!!!! First I would measure the ID of the drum and check against specs. If it is confirmed to be out of spec, I would then check with a company that relines brake shoes and see if they could do a thicker lining. If no luck there you will need to first find a lathe big enough to turn the drum. Then turn the ID smooth and round. After that, you will need to machine the OD of a steel ring to at least a 0.004" press fit. Then press the new ring into the drum and turn the ID back to the factory ID. This way it will be round and true with the axle.
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+1, Michael morse,over at https://www.vintagebrake.com/ can hook you up with some oversize linings. BTW, did you measure the drum diameter,against the factory service manual specs? If the drum was out of spec I would just source a good used hub somewhere, gotta be a bunch cheaper than putting a custom liner inside the drum.
 

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Late CB/CL72 and 77 are NOT the same as the 450's....They are 36 hole hubs and the 450 has holes for 40 spokes......
 

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Curious that they're not the same (36 vs 40 spokes) good catch there. I took a look and none of the rim numbers coincide either.

I guess you can't trust those cross references on parts sites (like Partzilla) as much as I thought.
 

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Actually, the CL77s do have 40 spoke front wheels. Early small brake versions have 40 spokes both front and rear, the later ones have 40 in the front and 36 in the rear. The 40 hole front hub has a different part number than the one for the 450.
 

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Mike is again correct, and apparently, the CL 77 I got my wheel from was actually running a CB77 hub (36 spokes), but it was laced to a 19" rim (Not the 18" I vaguely remember as being on the CB).......

A "Bitsa" part and I didn't even register it as such......
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I rushed to conclusion as I opened up the 40 spoke hub and steel isn't worn too far but the brake shoes are. Nominally 3/32" thick and worn to 1/32" at the thinnest part. Common Motor Collective sells new shoes.

I did take the overall diameter across the shoes with them relaxed, 7-5/8". When rotated beyond 45 degrees to where the rotational parts almost interfere with the stationary, diameter is now 7-7/8". New shoes is all I need. But I would still ponder and consider welding up the wheel if its ever came to that. Wouldn't be mixing steel with aluminum, just steel with steel. Not having a continuously smooth surface but with welded holes attaching both isn't uncommon as I've seen discs on motorcycles with drilled holes through them for the pads to rub against.
 

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There is a LOT of difference between a disc brake and a drum brake!!!! You have been told that the method you are wanting to do will not work and how to do it correctly. Proceded at your own risk.
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Discussion Starter #12
The reasons I've read and accept for not weld repairing a drum as I offered up has much to do with 1) hardness (forged steel as compared to drawn), 2) susceptibility of high spots that will get hotter than the rest under light loading, 3) metal can be stuffed off with the soft material and 4) it just isn't done except in the very rare instance where former drum material is ground down and sprayed on with an arc or something like that. There used to be an old guy down the street I could share ideas and had good experience to advise me. He's gone and now I'm the old guy. So I'm asking here.

I've seen weld repairs of motorcycle frames but that is different from a cast and forged drum. Thanks for all comments.
 

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97K miles is impressive! I thought I had the record, with 85k on my Bomber. Hats off to you, sir- you should plan a celebration when the old girl hits 100,000. That has to be a rare club :)

As for your project, I would not think of messing about with the hub like that. I have a drum that's still serviceable that you can have, free, to get you to the magic mileage. Im in Tacoma, PM me!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Update. Front drum is fine, new break shoes from Common Motor Collective were just great, thick, so that I moved the splined shaft levers on the drum a couple of notches back to where they were from the factory, I suppose. Concern is for the rear wheel and severe rust it has had over the years. Chrome is bubbling up from the rust that grew next to the inner tube, maybe the chrome is all that is holding the rear wheel together kind of thing. I'm communicating with two members on wheels and there is the $65 plus $100 shipping one of the early messages offered, so there are options out there for me. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks to mighty daniel for directing me to a local Craigs list link in Seattle, I did pick up a beautiful rear wheel, complete, very reasonable. The guy has a shop with many more motorcycles he told me. Had a beautiful front fender for a CL450 scrambler, decent rear fender, and lots of small parts. Would have given me free rear shocks. Has cables. PM me if you want his phone number so you can text him. Didn't have to pay shipping which was also nice.

As mentioned earlier, the new brake pads from Common Motor Collective are great on the front wheel on old drum. No problems at all now. With me changing tires though so often due to flats I caused by pinching the tube, I found the way to inflate and center the tire on the rim is to have the valve stem pushed back inside as much as possible as held by the nut. Hammer the tire with a mallet and squeeze it in towards the valve stem area. Then when half full with air and the tire beads are pushed out, pull the stem back out. Also, talc that area inside around the tube first.
 
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