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So I did a quick search, did not find any solid info, here it goes. Can anyone give a good break in proceedure for my 175? Basically, I broke it down, changed all the gaskets and seals, honed the jugs, put some fresh rings, cleaned up the valve train(lapped, new guide seals), new cam chain and tensioner, rebuilt the carbs. I just gave it a nice freshen up. I used assembly lube on the valve train, a little in the cylinders, so it should be safe on initial start-up. I'm looking for info on oil specifics, running the engine in, cycles to follow, just basic do's and don'ts. I plan on sticking with dino oil as the regular oil(unless i'm advised differently, amsoil does make some tempting stuff). Thanks!
Larry
 

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I'll have to agree.... Warm-up the engine,(operating temp) and ride it like you stole it!....
 

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I have to agree with Bill and Steve. In the race world we take them out and run them hard for a dozen laps and it's broke in. Granted, race motors get rebuilt more often so it's not as important as it might be on a long term street motor.

But let me give you another example. In the light aircraft world after new cylinders and/rings are installed the standard procedure is to run it at 75% power (basically that's full power) for several hours. On these aircraft engines they are typically 4 or 6 cylinder horizontally opposed air cooled motors. The key is to not overheat the motor. The explanation I've received is that you want to achieve high cylinder pressures to help force the rings against the cylinders and "seat" them. What they tell me you don't want is to run the engine easy and have the rings just lightly rub against the cylinders. It causes a glazing or burnishing or the cylinder walls or rings and, in the end, it doesn't seal as well.
 

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Just take it to the shop that has a dyno and let them do a couple of runs with it.
Then you will know how much HP you have going to the wheel after all your work and the engine will be properly broken in.
 
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