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Maybe I'm posting in the wrong area. Not getting any response. My 71 cb175 needs new shoes all the way around. Still had the originals. What are the best and where can I get them? I noticed the shoes on the rear are smaller than front. I cant find a place that sells the correct sizes. Any hep would be appreciated.
Thanks
LGR
 

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I've used both Vesrah and EBC shoes and neither have been perfect, but the EBCs were far better than the Vesrah shoes. The issue is they aren't properly surfaced to fit the drum correctly - they aren't square to the drum as delivered and take quite a while to bed in. Not a big deal with rear brakes, but front brakes are your lifesaver and if you lose 60% of your braking power when you change to new shoes, you better ride some backroads for a while to get them squared up so they stop well. Here is a search result with a lot of possibilities

https://www.google.com/search?q=honda+cb175+brake+shoes
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the response tom. What are your thoughts on using the original shoes. they don't seem worn at all.
 

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Historically brake shoes have been a poor fit and there were machines specifically for cutting a full surface at the correct radius allowing full braking performance.
I have heard (but not yet tried) that you can use rubber cement to affix sandpaper to the inner drum surface and rotate the wheel by hand until a full surface is achieved, chalk marks on the shoes will help determine progress and the rubber cement is easily removed afterward. Brake pads are no longer asbestos so common dust precautions will suffice.

Has anyone tried anything like this?
 

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Thanks for the response tom. What are your thoughts on using the original shoes. they don't seem worn at all.
Tom isn't online right now so I'll jump in with a caution not to reuse old brake shoes. The friction material can delaminate from the backing and spin around in the drum until the wheel suddenly locks up. There are stories and photos in other threads.

It would be ok for pushing and stopping a non-running bike around the shop, but I wouldn't trust them for any more than that.
 
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^^^agree with Alan on the old shoes... despite how good they may look, many here have seen the delamination and some have actually experienced it with a wheel lock-up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Okay, Good enough for me. I will not use the old shoes. Can you guys tell me what kind of grease this is in the front hub. I think it might be for the speedo. Its very thick

Thanks
LGR 0.jpg
 

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It's probably thick because it's old. I would use regular wheel bearing grease, most likely, what ever you have on hand will be ok. I wouldn't overdo it, you don't need the excess oozing out into the brake lining.
 

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I use high-temp wheel bearing grease on mine. As far as brake shoes go, I prefer the EBC ones.
 

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EBC H308 front, EBC H309 rear.

Old shoes ? - this might happen.

20181118_104438.jpg
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Sorry to bother you guys again. I want to be clear about my question on the shoes. As you see in the photo the left shoe goes on the rear drum and right shoe on front. It's not the thickness of the pad it's the size of the shoes that are different. When looking for new shoes it seems they are all the same size. Am I wrong? Your input is greatly appreciated.

LGR _DSC0121.JPG
 

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Hopefully the folks who sell you the new shoes will know the difference between the front and the rear.
 

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Brake shoes.

In the old days to make brake shoes work, first put the wheel in a lathe and skim the drum to make sure it was round. A big lathe. Then mount the new relined shoes on the backing plate with a packer, maybe about 3 mill thick, or enough to jack the shoes out so they won't fit in the drum, between the shoes and the cam. Then put assembly in the lathe , between centres and turn the shoe material down until it's just under the internal diameter of the drum. Take out the packers and away you go, or rather away you stop. It probably seems like a lot of stuffing around but it's a lot quicker than trying to bed them in with use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for all the replies. Got the shoes and will install today. Hopefully no issues. Ill let you know.
Later
LGR
 
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