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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thanks to some helpful folks here, and reading lots of old posts, after 20+ years in basement storage, I've got my Dad's 64 CA95 running. Took it for 60 sec ride on this nice New England Spring day! Going to be a fun around-town ride this Summer.

Not being a 'biker', I don't know what's 'normal'. The exhaust pipes are little blue on the first bend, and seem to be hot, after starting, letting sit idling for 5 minutes. I've seen folks say a rich or lean condition can cause this, or exhaust seal leak, etc. Just dodn't know where to start, or if it's even an issue/concern?

I've rebuilt the carb & petcock, cleaned gas tank, lubed all cables, new plugs. Cleaned the original air filter with vacuum, but it seemed to be in ok shape so I didn't replace it. Not sure if older air filter is ok or should be replaced.

Thx for any tips.

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Typically blamed on a lean condition. Best approach is to start with a thorough tuneup including a compression test. Follow that up with a series of plug chops to identify any mixture changes needed.

IIRC your carb has a metering rod with a series of notches. Placing the clip in the lowest notch will give the richest mixture. Back in the day seems everyone put the clip in the lowest notch. Gotta pack as much fuel as possible in there!!!!!!:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thx for response JT. Guess it's time to track down a compression gauge! I had to google what a 'plug chop' is lol. Your memory is correct, the carb has a set of notches, and I used the middle. May go have to to lower.
 

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Pipe bluing is something motorcycles do. You don't see it very often on a Honda, but as J-T says is can indicate a lean condition. Back in the day British bikes always had blue pipes. It is because Triumph, BSA and others used single wall exhaust pipes. Honda has a double wall pipe. It is possible that over the years the inner pipe has deteriorated and the hot exhaust gasses are reaching the outer pipe. Before anyone goes off on British bikes, this is one of the reasons why they are so light weight. In 1970 a new Triumph 650 weighed about 40# less than a comparable CB450.

Very nice bike, but I do have one question, why is it a spring day in New England? It is a typical cold wet day in Seattle....
 

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Yes, it did snow today for a bit there... but then it cleared up enough to ride.

I read this thread earlier today and decided to try moving the needles on my CL175. I've got some flat spots in the power band I figured maybe it's a little lean. The pipes are a bit blue too. I was third from the top (middle). I moved it all the way to the bottom. We'll see how it goes!
 
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