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Thanks to Bill Lane for dropping a Honda Mech Super Secret (from now on known as a HMSS) valve adjusting technique on me. It was so easy and works so well! The long and the short of the "technique" is to adjust them with a warm engine by ear while the bike is running. The use of a mechanics stethoscope (sp?) or a long screw driver amplifies the sound to your ear. Loosen one valve until it clatters, tighten till the engine starts to bog down back it off till it's happy. Tighten the lock nut making sure the adjuster doesn't move and TA DA!


I also definitely recommend building the little timing light the book says to use to get the opening of the points dead on. Makes huge difference in how it times.

Bill hope you don't mind me giving away the secret but it just works too well not to share.

Eric / Novafrk
 

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Novafrk said:
Thanks to Bill Lane for dropping a Honda Mech Super Secret (from now on known as a HMSS) valve adjusting technique on me. It was so easy and works so well! The long and the short of the "technique" is to adjust them with a warm engine by ear while the bike is running. The use of a mechanics stethoscope (sp?) or a long screw driver amplifies the sound to your ear. Loosen one valve until it clatters, tighten till the engine starts to bog down back it off till it's happy. Tighten the lock nut making sure the adjuster doesn't move and TA DA!
I also definitely recommend building the little timing light the book says to use to get the opening of the points dead on. Makes huge difference in how it times.

Bill hope you don't mind me giving away the secret but it just works too well not to share.

Eric / Novafrk

Well, just make sure everyone knows it's for 350's ONLY.

And don't get too "greedy" - live with a little bit of clatter, for the sake of your cam and lifters.
At their best, 350's had a lot of top end noise.

Never, ever try it on a 450 !!!!!

It's not really a "secret", we just never wanted customers to know it took so little effort on a 350.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the clarification Bill. So what was the book rate on a valve adjustment? Bet you made bank on that!

Eric
 

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Yeah, the 350 tune-ups were gravy.
The shop manager used to divvy them up between us so none of the mechanics got honked off.
I think flat rate was an hour & 1/2 maybe.
 

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It's cool to hear about these old techniques, Did you ever check any clearances after doing it by ear, just to see how close you were?
 

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gord said:
It's cool to hear about these old techniques, Did you ever check any clearances after doing it by ear, just to see how close you were?

Yes I did - they were typically just a bit looser than spec, but not much.....
 

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Well, that ain't just the 'HMSS' technique. That's standard operating procedure for shade-tree mechanics or those 'down on the farm'.

I watched my dad & older brothers set valve clearances by ear on any number of different bikes back then. Set the intakes for a light click, set the exhausts for a slightly louder click.

:D
 

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Novafrk said:
Thanks for the clarification Bill. So what was the book rate on a valve adjustment? Bet you made bank on that!

Eric
Our shop rate was (I think) about $20 per hour - multiply that times the flat rate hours, and the mechanic got half.
 

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I know you said 350 only... and don't want to sound too dumb, but I hear the 350 and 360 are pretty similar. Can I use this tip for my 360 or not?
 

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Bone said:
I know you said 350 only... and don't want to sound too dumb, but I hear the 350 and 360 are pretty similar. Can I use this tip for my 360 or not?
I don't think so - 360 has a tappet adjuster thingy on the end of the tappet, right??
350/450 have tappets on eccentric shafts, you turn the shaft to adjust.
 

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I guess. I'm out of my league :) The manual and Clymer's both say to put a tappet feeler gauge in between the valve stem and tappet adjuster screw. Without a good picture, I'm as useless as tits on a bull. I may skip valve adjustment for now and move on to the ignition timing, which was described in great detail on these forums.
 

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Bone said:
I guess. I'm out of my league :) The manual and Clymer's both say to put a tappet feeler gauge in between the valve stem and tappet adjuster screw. Without a good picture, I'm as useless as tits on a bull. I may skip valve adjustment for now and move on to the ignition timing, which was described in great detail on these forums.
Bill was saying the same thing as the manual for the 360. On the 350 and 450 it uses a completely different method to adjust the valves. It does not use a tappet adjust screw like the 360, so the technique discussed with the engine might not work.

With that said, I've adjust many Mopar and Chevy V8's using tappet screws and the engine running. If you don't have experience adjusting valves you might NOT want to try that.

In this case, just follow the manual.
 

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The 360 uses the little round access holes to get to the screw & lock nut type adjuster.
I simply set mine about half again as loose as the factory said & left them. It's slightly clicky, idles well, & starts good. When I set it to stock specs it idled funny & was hard to start hot. :?

BTW. . .the easy way to set this clearance is to close them to zero lash & back the intakes off 1/4 turn & the exhausts 5/16 turn & lock them down. Just make sure you set both intakes & both exhausts exactly the same.

Also, make very sure your wrench does not hit the edge of the access hole when you tighten the lock nut. This mistake costed me an engine once. The lock nut & adjuster screw backed out & went through the timing chain!! :oops: :shock: :? :cry:
 
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