Honda Twins banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,458 Posts
hard to tell just from the looks alone but I would guess mid to late 80's
Only way to confirm is to look at the VIN
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
hard to tell just from the looks alone but I would guess mid to late 80's
Only way to confirm is to look at the VIN
Looking for a fixer upper have not seen it yet for real go look on Saturday


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,085 Posts
Check out ngwclub.com and join there so you can ask, tons of info and knowledgeable Wing owners there who will be able to answer your questions. If you post the VIN and it's no newer than '88, I can check it in my Honda ID Guide
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
1984 to 1987 seeing it is a 1200. It is an Interstate so is the base unit. The 84 units had rear wheel issues but the later years were OK and the wheels swap out.

It looks a little rough. The 1500 from 88 to 2000 is a better buy with more support and available parts. You also go from 4 carbs that cost major $$ to rebuild to one carb that seldom has issues. Rear shocks are suspect and expensive for all the wings. The brakes are linked so that can add potential problems if there has been poor maintenance.

I would be very reluctant to pay much for a rough Wing that has been sitting or put much money into it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,537 Posts
The mirrors indicate it is a 84. But my 85 interstate has 84 mirrors on it. Brakes on these take a lot of $$$ to restore. The gas take takes a lot of work to get out for cleaning. Some folks on NGW clean them in place. The rear wheel bearings are only an issue if the bike has been abused by overloading. My '85 was off the road for 10 years. I paid $500 for it and spent another $3000 on it and 38 days in the garage. I would be more worried about the stator. The engine has to come out to change it. My 85 is a sweet running bike and is great on the freeway. I'm glad I did it. What these pictures don't show are: the work required to overhaul the brakes, overhaul the hydraulic clutch, install new wheel bearings, remove the gas tank for cleaning and lining, removing the carburetors twice for overhauling and to get them right, pulling the swing arm to grease the bearings, removing the drive shaft to service the splines, replacing the cam belts, new radiator hoses and cap and rebuilding the shocks. Then after getting it on the road finding out the radiator was shot. The week after returning from a 1200 mile trip through eastern Oregon the stator went out and there were four weekends pulling the engine to repair it. I think it is finally sorted out. it is a nice bike and I will not live long enough to wear it out. I love these old 4 cylinder wings. I'm working on an 81 standard model. If I had to choose between the two I would have the 1100. They are more like a CB and can be pushed harder than the 1200. The early 1100s have tighter gear spacings and the engine turns slightly higher RPM.

85 GL1200 front.jpg 85 GL1200 Side.jpg garage work (19) Web Size.jpg Engine Out Web Size.jpg

Edit: there is no such thing as a cheap Goldwing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Did not end up getting it was sitting in a snow bank covered in snow would of had to un shovel it and everything to much cud be wrong “junk” in my eyes


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Whenever considering any old bike - look at the surroundings. Well kept home/garage? Probably a well-kept machine. Area looks like a dump? Pass it by. A well-kept GL1100, 1200, or 1500 should go 200k miles with little difficulty. Alternators would be major failure, and although requiring engine removal it is a straight-forward job. Carbs are fine if ethanol is avoided, stabilizer used, and regularly operated. I'm a fan of the 1000s, but the others are great, also. I also ride an 1800 that we've put 114k miles on so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,980 Posts
One thing to watch for,in the oldewings, is rust in the lower frame section. Pay special attention to the area around the center stand mounts and lower main tube sections. It can all be repaired,of course, depends on what you feel like doing and what you paid for the motorcycle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,980 Posts
Did not end up getting it was sitting in a snow bank covered in snow would of had to un shovel it and everything to much cud be wrong “junk” in my eyes


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
My basic rule of thumb: the deeper the snow, the lower the offer.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JamesPal

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
My basic rule of thumb: the deeper the snow, the lower the offer.
And thy lost the key so going into not even knowing if it turns over my buddy is a locksmith and cud make a key I guess I cud of put in N and jump the starter to see 400$ is all thy would take I’m all set


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top