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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm digging great chunks of what looks like amber out of a second hand fuel tank that I've just bought.

I think the big lumps are out now, but there is clearly a coating of the stuff on the tank floor. I had to drill holes in the stuff in order to break up the lumps small enough to pass through the filler neck, and the smell given off during drilling was very much like styrene, as used in body filler. Otherwise, I'd have assumed that it was some sort of epoxy.

I'm wondering if MEK ( Methyl Ethyl Ketone, aka Butanone ) might dissolve it ? Or any other chemical / solvent available to the public at large ?

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It does look like some kind of resin, strange how it ended up in a tank in such large quantities. If you have some different kinds of solvent around you could try breaking off small bits of what you have already extracted and let it soak in some different solutions for a day or two to see the effect. Try MEK like you mentioned, probably acetone as well. Hopefully you can find something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've ordered a litre of this stuff, from Villiers Services, not Feked as picture.

sealeater.JPG

Universal sealant eater. For removing old,lifting tank sealer prior to refinishing. This product will remove sealants based on Novolac Epoxies, Amine Epoxies, Polyester resins and paint from the inside of steel or alloy fuel tanks
While in Tesco yesterday, I picked up 3 bottles of Harpic Extra Strength, as it was on offer, basically 10% HCL with added perfume, to be used once / if the sealant comes out OK.
 

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Richard the stuff I use is called Spirits of Salts and it’s a stronger solution of HCl Acid which eats rust. I finish off with phosphoric Acid which leaves a phosphate coating which reduces the flash rust; then when drying I use acetone to absorb any water in the crevices. Once dry and rust free you can use your tank without a coating as long as you keep petrol in the tank and use the bike regularly.
 

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Once it's clear I recommend going to this chap. He was based near Luton. He did my Bomber tank and it is still perfect. it was outside for 12 years to give you an idea if the issues he faced with it.

His name is Steve email [email protected] phone 01234 381990
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Richard the stuff I use is called Spirits of Salts and it’s a stronger solution of HCl Acid which eats rust. I finish off with phosphoric Acid which leaves a phosphate coating which reduces the flash rust; then when drying I use acetone to absorb any water in the crevices. Once dry and rust free you can use your tank without a coating as long as you keep petrol in the tank and use the bike regularly.
Thanks for that.

In a previous life, I worked in a hospital laboratory, with access to concentrated HCL, HN03, H2S04, plus a whole range of solvents in bulk. Sadly, or should that be happily, those days are long gone. H&S was already spoiling our fun before I retired.

So the plan is - HCL from toilet cleaner, followed by phosphoric acid courtesy of Machine Marts rust remover, then possibly acetone from Amazon. I'm a bit surprised that Amazon sell acetone in bulk, as you read about terrorists resorting to buy it in small quantities from Boots, as nail polish remover.


I've lined a couple of tanks with POR15 with good results so far, I'll see what this one looks like after the derusting treatment.
 
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