Honda Twins banner

21 - 26 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,706 Posts
Interesting. Just shows what can hide behind a shiny website.

There's one close to me. When I first got my CL175, I rang the guy about getting a frame repair done. His attitude was so dismissive and negative that I haven't bothered with him since. I would have been a genuine customer, guess they can afford to turn business away.

Classic and Modern Bikes - Bike Restoration and Repair
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
Looking at the pictures and the way the drum brake rod has come apart and twisted around the axle. Can anybody explain how this has happened as the nut and captive bolt that go through the drum arm are still on the rod?
I can understand how the nut came loose and the rod came apart and ended up bending around the axle but everting is still i place. Isn’t it?
 

·
66Sprint
Joined
·
26,297 Posts
AS the assembly rotated, the clevis end of the brake arm was twisted and opened far enough to release the rod, spring, joint (slug/barrel bar/trunnion), and nut......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
AS the assembly rotated, the clevis end of the brake arm was twisted and opened far enough to release the rod, spring, joint (slug/barrel bar/trunnion), and nut......
Thanks 66Sprint. What I don't understand is how did the brake arm rotate to release the slug/barrel bar/ trunnion? causing the damage. Is there anything within the drum brakes that could have caused this?
 

·
66Sprint
Joined
·
26,297 Posts
The torque-stay bolt came out.......because the nut vibrated off.....because of a missing cotter.......Next time brakes were applied was at speed.....Shoes do their job and bind to drum, but without torque arm connection, brakeplate rotates with wheel...As it spins, the rotation pulls harder on the linkage rod, locking the shoes even tighter, wrapping the rod around the axle to its limit.....IF there is still momentum force to dissipate, the rod could break, OR the arm clevis could splay open, twisting as the trunnion continues to pull on one side of the clevis slightly longer than the other, ( which is a Physics thing, ask me for the experiment that proves it), OR the tire/wheel locks up, sliding until force abates..... The weakest link always gives first (same experiment)....... In THIS case it was the clevis that gave first......Most of the time it's tire adhesion that fails first, resulting in a skid.....
 
21 - 26 of 26 Posts
Top