Honda Twins banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My recently restored Honda cb350 which has been rebuilt really poorly by a UK restorer. I won't go into details just yet as I'm working my way through the stickies in here to see if I can the bike running.
I just happened to look down at the bike in the garage and noticed the brake rod to the rear drum brake had twisted around the rear axle. Any idea how this might have happened. I was so stressed on my first ride out with the bike staling, no power, white smoke through breather that I did not notice this brake issue. It wasn't a great restoration job but He didn't leave the bike like that with me. Please see pics. IMG_7262.jpg IMG_7262.jpg IMG_7263.jpg IMG_7264.jpg
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,725 Posts
You would know immediately if this happened to you while riding... when the torque arm for the rear brake backing plate comes loose, whether the bolt in it fell out of the forward end at the swingarm or the rear end of the arm at the brake backing plate, the next time the rear brake is applied it spins the backing plate and winds all the parts up and around the axle - usually resulting in locked rear brakes and sliding to a stop. You may not have noticed it, but it almost had to be that way when you got it back from him... or someone else rode the bike and you didn't know
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,725 Posts
The arm looks pretty bad, probably wouldn't come out very well if straightened. The rod might be usable, depends on how well you can get it straightened out. eBay would be a source for good used parts.

Based on just this experience, I'd suspect anything the shop or individual touched...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,508 Posts
In the last picture it appears that the brake anchor arm is still in place. Maybe it was reinstalled after the incident but nothing else fixed. Better go thru the whole machine with a fine tooth comb, in case he left you some other "surprises".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
This happened to me in the spring. If the nut that holds the brake strap to the hub comes off, the hub can rotate and this happens. Luckily I was able to get the replacement parts for about $60 total.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,725 Posts
In the last picture it appears that the brake anchor arm is still in place. Maybe it was reinstalled after the incident but nothing else fixed. Better go thru the whole machine with a fine tooth comb, in case he left you some other "surprises".
Yeah, I think it was put back together after the fact and hoped it wouldn't be noticed... likely to be more "surprises" if the shop/guy is that sketchy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
631 Posts
Look at the other end of the brake torque arm, the Swingarm end, is the bolt, washer, nut and split pin present? If the bolt is missing from either end of the torque arm, and the rear brake is applied, when the bike is moving, you'll get the result you've got. I was fortunate in that an MOT Tester found the bolt was there, but my nut, washer and split pin was missing before this happened to me! You will need a new brake rod, and spring; probably the trunnion and nut; and a new lever arm, check the splines haven't stripped on the actuating cam too. And finally fit a new split pin on your axle nut.....it's missing in the photos...it would seem worthwhile spending £30 getting an MOT inspector to look at your bike to see if there are any other surprises waiting for you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,658 Posts
it would seem worthwhile spending £30 getting an MOT inspector to look at your bike to see if there are any other surprises waiting for you!
Seconded whole heartedly !

The MOT exemption for historic vehicles that are actually being used is madness, IMHO.

Different matter if it is just a museum piece.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,970 Posts
Better the rear than the front. I had a front one come loose years ago, and when I applied the brake, the entire brake assembly rotated and locked up, flipping the bike at about 40 mph and sending me sliding down the road. Not fun... That said, I'd check the front brake stay also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the replies guys. Im not going to give up on this bike but Its really testing me. Yet to have ride on it in 4 Years. The restoration guy had it for 3 Years. I did a compression test tonight with 125 PSI on both pistons on a stone cold engine with no carbs on. What do you reckon?
I had no power whatsoever when I tried to ride during this ride where the drum brake arm came apart. I could have walked faster and the bike kept stalling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Ive got a box full of goodies from Common motor collective to try and revive this bike. Carb service kit, electronic points, new pet cock, oil lines and clamps, fuel line filters, carb floats, ....
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,725 Posts
Ive got a box full of goodies from Common motor collective to try and revive this bike. Carb service kit, electronic points, new pet cock, oil lines and clamps, oil filters, carb floats, ....
Oh jeez... you didn't buy that Shockwave thing - did you? Since you're getting stiffed for international shipping anyway, can we recommend price-checking other places like 4into1.com for some of this kind of stuff? You'll save money... and don't use the new brass in the carb kits, clean and re-use your old brass
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Oh jeez... you didn't buy that Shockwave thing - did you? Since you're getting stiffed for international shipping anyway, can we recommend price-checking other places like 4into1.com for some of this kind of stuff? You'll save money... and don't use the new brass in the carb kits, clean and re-use your old brass
It does actually have a bowyer Branston kit already installed so the shockwave might not get fitted. Thanks for the advice with the brass parts.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,725 Posts
It does actually have a bowyer Branston kit already installed so the shockwave might not get fitted. Thanks for the advice with the brass parts.
You have been paying attention to the Shockwave test thread here - right? One of the beta testers is a member and his failed during a group ride recently...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
544 Posts
You probably don't like doing your own work but it might be wise to:

Tighten the shock upper and lower bolts.

Remove each tire and replace it if it is over 4 or 5 years old. Check the spokes. When you replace the tire remember which tools you used and start making a kit for the bike. Check online parts fische if you have questions. I like to run Seafoam through the gas for any bike that has been sitting.

Beyond that change the oil after about 300 miles or 500Km. Then follow the owners manual maintenance schedule. Keep the battery on a tender and clean. Enjoy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Where are you?

David Silver and CMSNL seem to have plenty of parts and the shipping will be less painful.

I'd name and shame the "restorer" too. The MOT is a racket to sell non-strident horns and replace the brake light lamps that mysteriously blow as they wheel it in for test, but anyone selling service work and missing nuts on the brake linkage wants throwing out of the industry.

+1 on the tyre advice. Mine came with one date stamped 1999. The tread is fine which pleased the seller, but you can see how aged the rubber is. If the tube is as bad it's one pot hole away from a blow out.

Andy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,658 Posts
The MOT is a racket to sell non-strident horns and replace the brake light lamps that mysteriously blow as they wheel it in for test,
That might have been true 20 years ago. Reputable MOT testers want to keep their licences, and are not there to drum up trade for the service departments. I'm happy with the standard of the work I do on my own bikes, and I'd be mortified if one of mine failed on a major safety related issue*, but I value having a second pair of unbiased eyes looking over my handiwork. No different that putting a race bike through scrutineering.

In the UK, bikes that are MOT exempt are getting the café racer, brat bike, whatever treatment, at the hands of bodgers whose only interest is to sell the things at a profit to clueless newbies who don't have the skills to maintain their new purchases. I'd bet that a compulsory MOT test on these 'modified' bikes would soon sort out a lot of faulty workmanship.

* That said, my Hornet just failed on a missing rear number plate light. Said light has been missing for years, ever since I fitted an aftermarket LED rear light, and has passed the MOT each time until now. Same shop, different tester. :-?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,725 Posts
* That said, my Hornet just failed on a missing rear number plate light. Said light has been missing for years, ever since I fitted an aftermarket LED rear light, and has passed the MOT each time until now. Same shop, different tester. :-?
The human element!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Where are you?

David Silver and CMSNL seem to have plenty of parts and the shipping will be less painful.

I'd name and shame the "restorer" too. The MOT is a racket to sell non-strident horns and replace the brake light lamps that mysteriously blow as they wheel it in for test, but anyone selling service work and missing nuts on the brake linkage wants throwing out of the industry.


Im Forest of Dean, Glos, UK.
I will happily shame him. He had the bike for 3 Years and dumped it on me. Carb parts missing, white smoke and fuel bellowing out of breather tube, oil leak on gear shifter and top end, back brake, fuel lines worn and degrading, drum came apart, bike won't go above walking pace and stalls.

Apart from that its had a full rebuild, everything new apparently. This is the company https://www.aspirerestorations.co.uk
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top