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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Thought I’d go through and document how I restored the two gauges on my 1974 CB360. Obviously, I can not be held responsible for anything associated with this modification if you decide to try this yourself. It's informational only. Disclaimers surely are a wet blanket.

After attaching my newly re-chromed crash bar, the whole bike looked great…well except for the faces of both gauges. I’m sure you all realize the slippery slope a restoration produces. It’s difficult to just say “STOP”! I looked at the speedo gauge and the redline portion was…well orange. I decided to pull the trigger over the winter and attempt the restoration.



After reviewing some recommended gauge restoration procedures, I ran across a really neat project from CaptB incorporating a small digital voltmeter within the face of the tach.

http://www.hondatwins.net/forums/1-project-logs/21268-gauge-restoration-volt-meter-mod.html

What a great project that is quite functional. So after ordering the meter, I started the project.

Here are the tools that I used which should be self explanatory.




The hose clamp secures the chrome compression band around the gauge so as to prevent flexing of the band as one pry’s the chrome ring slowly off. The blue rubber strip may be inserted between the chrome ring and the hose clamp to prevent marring the surface of the chrome. One may also substitute duct tape instead of the blue rubber.

The prying tool is a paint can lid remover easily acquired at the local Wal-Mart. I filed the edges of the paint can lid remover smaller for easier prying of the chrome ring:



Slowly work your way around the ring several times until the ring slides off:





Next I slowly and gently rocked the curved needle nose pliers under the tach needle to pop it off. Take your time with this procedure.



Remove the two face screws to remove the faceplate.



I next marked the face plate as to where the voltmeter would be mounted, avoiding clearance problems when later reassembling.



The rectangular opening was cut and filed smaller than the outside dimension of the voltmeter.



Next the face was wet sanded to remove the lines of the voltmeter opening and to produce a flat surface for new decal face placement. Then a trial fit of the voltmeter.




I secured the voltmeter to the underside of the tach face with 5 minute epoxy and also secured part of the wires also.



Continued Below...
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
I next talked with Catiawheels pertaining to a customized speedo and tach face. He was able to change the color from the original dark green to a blue that complemented the color of the bike. He also moved the “x1000rpm” to above the tach needle and then added “VOLTS” below the needle in a fashion that were centered correctly. He has a store on the major online auction site. Kudos to him for a fantastic customized tach and speedo face.



Because the gauge cases were chipped and scratched over the years, I decided to wet sand the rough spots and repaint. I also baked the painted cases at 180 degrees for two hours which potentially only speeds the curing time and flows the paint.







Next I drilled a hole through the case removing metal filings produced and then reassembled the tach faceplate. A knot was tied prior to feeding the wire through the case. (I know…overkill). Also a vinyl grommet was incorporated within the case to prevent chaffing.





The next part was challenging to say the least. I soldered the wires of the voltmeter to a flat pin plug and then carefully folded the retainment lugs into the insulation of the wires for a secure connection. I also used some shrink tubing to finish off the internal electrical connections.





Prior to reassembling the gauge, I painted the tip of the needle with some on hand fluorescent needle paint. One could also use fluorescent finger nail polish.



The process of re-assembling the gauge involves slowly re-crimping the compression band back onto the gauge. I used a small portion of duct tape on one end of the needle nose pliars to prevent marring the surface of the top portion of the visible ring. The key is to take your time with the compression process of the ring around the gauge.

A trial test on the bike with a new LED tach gauge light was made against the unrestored speedo gauge with the original incandescent bulb. What a significant difference.



Continued below...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Satisfied with the new look and function of the tach, the speedo was next to be re-faced. The 70mph indicator mark, which was once originally red, was somewhat difficult to see any color.



The same similar procedures were applied to the speedo gauge and case.



And the final results. Personally well worth the time and effort to clean up the final appearance of the bike.







 

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look to see if there is a small set screw on the knob.
 

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Very nice work!! Looks awesome.
Now can you give us a little info on that vintage ski-doo hanging in the garage?
And how many ice augers does one need? LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Very nice work!! Looks awesome.
Now can you give us a little info on that vintage ski-doo hanging in the garage?
And how many ice augers does one need? LOL
Whoa...been riding too much I guess.

Grew up with the Johnson line of outboards. If you couldn't identify an outboard coming toward you in the 60's, then man, you were classified as a lily. Hence the interest in outboards. Years ranging from approximately 1911 through the 1940's. All great runners.

The vintage sled you see is an unrestored 1966 Johnson Skee-Horse snowmobile. Twin opposed with approximately 14 horses. Extremely limited use from 1966. Other sleds include the Ski Doo Nordics from 1969 through 1971 and a 1972 775 TnT sled. Also a restored 1971 Johnson Skee-Horse. Boy was that the cat's meow in 1971. Slow but who cares??? Wild colors then:



 

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I'm restoring a tach. The face plate screws are missing. Does anybody what the screws are?
They aren't M2x.40 (too small) or M2.5x.45 (appears too big).
 

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Trying todo my speedo. Does anyone know how to remove the rubber captor the trip odometer? It's preventing m from getting things apart.

View attachment 56040
Just push it into the housing and it will stay onto the mechanism and go through the hole in the housing as one unit.
 

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0620161322b-1.jpg
This is what I started with. 0809161755.jpg
This is a decal.
0809161830.jpg
I cut a hole in a piece of 2x6 to hold gauge. I used a mallet and a socket driver to 23rd crimp the band.
0809161830a.jpg
0809162001.jpg
Reassembled gauge. Still kicking myself for not painting needle tip.
0811162053.jpg
Speedometer is original. 0811162053a.jpg
Used green leds instead of incandescent.
 

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These are great renovations.

I took the gauges of my bike today and the rubber gaskets between the black case and the back plate have pretty much desolved. Are replacemnts easily available or has anyone found a suitable alternative?
 

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Can't seem to find a howto for my bike! I have a 1968 CB250 with the all plastic body speedo / tacho with the raised front clear plastic. Is thee any way I can get these apart?
I have to replace to plastic on one , as it's cracked and I need to to get it registered (They are tough down here on licensing, people get knocked back for trivial things like missing reflectors, not stock exhaust, wrong fender etc) Anyway, I'm going to buy a cheap not working gauge to get the good plastic from and then hopefully someone givs me some tips in the interim and I can swap them out. Plus the faces are badly faded and I need to buy some new overlays anyway as they are faded from being in the sun and are in M/PH and I want to change to K/MH. Many Thanks guys.
 

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what about getting some universal aftermarket gauges for your CB250?

Pretty sure it's a standard speedo ratio of 2240:60 mph or 2330:100 kmh for Japanese motorcycles
And the tach should be 7:1 ratio
 
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