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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just moved from Colorado to Texas and after pulling my bike of the trailer it will no longer start. It's a 1974 Honda CL360 and I had the carbs tuned/synced a month ago and the bike rode fine the day before moving.

This is my first bike and so I am still new to the art of CV carb adjustment.

After many many kickstarts (battery dead from trying to start it) I had the bike running for about a minute, but it idled rough and felt like it wanted to die when giving a little throttle. Eventually it stalled and now I cannot get the bike to start again.

Currently the mixture screws are the standard 1 1/4 turns out and the idle was set at ~1300 rpm.

I have no idea what jets are currently in the carbs, but at a minimum I would like to get the bike running well enough to get it to the shop for some professional assistance.

Thanks in advance.
-John
 

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You're too rich now. Gotta step it down on the main jet.
 

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The altitude change shouldn't cause the type of troubles you're describing. Have you checked that you're getting fuel to the carbs? You wouldn't be the first guy that worked all day on a bike that had the petcock turned off. :oops:
 

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J-T said:
The altitude change shouldn't cause the type of troubles you're describing. Have you checked that you're getting fuel to the carbs? You wouldn't be the first guy that worked all day on a bike that had the petcock turned off. :oops:
Done that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have done that before, but not this time.

There is definitely fuel in the lines, and the petcock is on. Now whether its pulling any into the float bowls.... I don't know. Is there a way to check? I suppose that the float needle could be blocking fuel but I'd hate to take them out unless someone figures that is probably the case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I just pulled the spark plugs and they are definitely fouled. Don't know if that's the entire issue, but worth swapping. It had been running a tad rich in Colorado, hence the fouled plugs, but I figured it would be just right when it got back down to sea level. I'll replace these and see if that fixes anything.

-John
 

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First, it won't run properly with a weak/dead battery.... Once that is fixed it should run (install new plugs)..... You need to be slightly richer at sea level as the air is denser/heavier there......So, I believe the plugs were already fouled, it wouldn't start because of that, and you killed the battery....
 
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