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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
(Better ask this question while I still have the receipts from the hardware store!)

I am not a fan of the (partially stripped) phillips head screws on my engine covers that I needed to remove with an impact driver. I am very interested in replacing all of them with allen head screws.

I was able to get a stainless steel set for the points cover and the alternator cover. However for the length of screw required for the clutch cover, right side cover, and starter motor cover, the only option available was the black oxide allen head screws. Anyone know if black oxide reacts poorly with aluminum? If they are going to start rusting after one riding season, I will return them and maybe order custom from McMaster Carr or something like that (I just prefer buying stuff like this in store where I can feel and measure).
 

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Try going to BoltDepot.com. They have metric hex socket bolts in 18-8 and 316 stainless as well as the black oxide. And for a lot less money.
I would prefer the stainless myself as black oxide isn't as corrosion resistant as plating.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good deal. I will return the black oxide and buy the SS ones online.
 

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There is always the possibility of over tightening these socket head bolts.
What precautions should be taken.?? One of the problems with the
phillips screws on these bikes if that they are JIS, not phillips.
 

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If you take Jim's advice and get the kit, the vendor has very specific torque values included. As well as the recommendation to use never seize.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Done. Purchased kit from eBay seller. I like easy. Plus it was way cheaper and you get more stuff compared to what is offered on like common motor.
 

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Black oxide will rust pretty quickly. I just trash-canned a bunch of them and replaced them with stainless ones.
 

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There is always the possibility of over tightening these socket head bolts.
What precautions should be taken.?? One of the problems with the
phillips screws on these bikes if that they are JIS, not phillips.
I've stripped my share before I learned. Tighten just till you can tell its there and maybe 1/8 more. There's a reason they use 8 bolts to hold a 2 oz. cover on. I had to have stainless caps awhile back but these days think the originals, if nice, look better, or maybe just "right".
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Installed a bit from the eBay kit last night. I added a healthy amount of anti-seize to the threads as well. The stainless socket head bolts look really nice on the engine, and give it a sort of "riveted" look. Tightened everything to "fingertight" and then a 1/8th of a turn more.
 

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Just keep in mind the Allen Heads will allow you to WAY OVER TORQUE the fasteners.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Follow up question:
So this kit comes with 6mm cylinder allen-head bolts (one on each side of the head that connects to the cylinders), called the "cylinder head insulator bolt" in the manual. Original spec is 5.1-8 lbs-ft. Is this torque value still applicable, or should I use the spec listed in the eBay seller's literature?

Additionally, this kit also comes with allen-head replacement bolts for the the 14 cylinder head cover bolts. I haven't seen a torque spec for the original bolts in the manual. What torque specification recommended for these?
 

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Use the vendors specification. He knows what he is talking about. He specifies using a lower torque when using never seize or blue loc-tite because this acts as a lubricant and will properly tension the bolts at a lower torque value.
Note that when you torque a bolt, the recommended value tensions the bolt (stretches the bolt) to a point below its yield point. This tension will prevent loosening unless some force which exceeds the tension (hopefully, you, when removing) comes along.
 
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