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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
No pictures of the bike yet, need to drag it out into the open to get some before pictures.

Work Completed:
Clean and rebuild Carburetors.

I have ordered:
New fuel Tank, in my OEM Color - Received:

fueltank.jpg
Front Brake Caliper Cylinder in Stainless Steel
Center Stand
Some Wiring Brackets
Brand New Petcock
Signal Lights (For the Brackets)
Fuel Tank cushion rubbers (Lost Mine).

I will also need:
Battery
Front and rear Rim and Spokes
Tires
Tubes
Higher Capacity Stator Coil and fancy cheap regulator/rectifier Ala Kohler.
Electronic Ignition (Maybe PAMCO)
LED Lighting
Muffler Pipe Wrap to hide the old MAC 2 into 1 exhaust.

35 Watt H4 Bulb. A long time ago I converted to an H4 5 1/4 automotive headlight. 55/60 watt. It lit up the road great, but the alternator couldn't keep up. Stock is 35W/50W candle, er bulb.... I have the original back. I have quite a few LED Bulbs, and will replace most of the other lights with LED so I can run the H4 55/60 watt in the future. Until then , a 35/50W H4 will work for brighter than stock lighting.

As it is, I have about $600 into it. I already cleaned and rebuilt the carbs.

I figure about $2000 to $2500 to finish, altogether.

But my old (Owned it since 1978, 34 years)Honda will ride again, better than ever.

Some other items:
In 1980, I bought an Oil cooler and optional thermostat for it. I had to drill the clutch-side cover and tap a fitting into the oil passage. the oil goes throught a 3 way valve, depending on temperature, and either goes through the cooler, or bypasses it. I'll post picture later.

Also, I drilled and tapped the 2 top fork caps and put nylon air lines between the 2 forks and tee'd to an air gauge. I run about 5-7 PSI in the forks. Keeps them from bottoming out. Pictures on this to follow as I move along.

I figure the bike may be ride-able next spring, unless life throws some changes (Make God laugh, tell him your plans) my way.
 

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Re: '76 CB360t Restore

Life always throws changes your way; thats about the only thing you can count on.

Best of luck on the build. The tank looks great, what happen to the original?

I just got mine on the road after carting it around for 27 years. I wish mine was something closer to a 360t. I like that model.

Even so, I am having a blast on my little one.

Look forward to the rest of your rebuild.

John
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Re: '76 CB360t Restore

When I originally parked the bike, I neglected to drain a half tank of gas. The tank looks like it has asphalt in the bottom and the paint was pretty bad shape.
The cost (since I am mechanical, but painting I leave to those more skilled) would be as much to clean and restore the old tank as to get this one.

The carbs were pretty bad too, but I am pretty good at rebuilding carbs (I make a lot of extra cash in the 70's rebuilding carburetors for the guys in my Army unit , who were also mechanics,).
I chiseled out the tar, thoroughly cleaned them, replaced the jets, and they look better inside then out right now.

The tank is awaiting disposition, but I may try selling it to offset the cost of the new tank. I see there are quite a few people better at restoring tanks than I am. But as a former diesel mechanic, and now a mechanical engineer, I have no fear of tearing the motor down. I once replaced my shift forks (on a 69 CB350) right out of the trunk of my car. Easy as pie. But painting, ugh, I can't seem to do it well, and don't have the space to even start it right.

I will clean and rattle can the frame and stuff, but a good candy sapphire paint with clear coat will always escape me.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Re: '76 CB360t Restore

Some more items came in. A Stainless Steel 304 Brake caliper piston. Shouldn't ever rot/rust or decay. A seized brake piston was what grounded my bike in the first place. And a shiny new Petcock.



Have a new seal coming from Bike Bandit.

My "new Used" center stand has arrived too.



Along with some missing chassis wiring harness clips.



Still waiting for the tank cushions:



Should be here by Saturday.

I haven't decided yet whether I want to get it running, then tear it apart and clean it up, or just strip it down, clean and paint the frame and re-assemble it with new improved parts. I am leaning right now into just pull it apart, clean and paint, and reassemble. I won't want to pull it apart once it is drivable, and it really needs the cleaning.

Hopefully I can get a picture of it for the "Before" file.

The wheels are my next order, along with the magic Kohler Regulator/rectifier. But I need to build up a few more $ in the old bank account.

For now, I think my next step is to rehab the front brake caliper. After that, I will have some excitement about continuing.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Re: '76 CB360t Restore

Some Pictures of the old Gal:

Left Side View:


Right Side View:


Front 3/4 View - Air horn are near top of fork.


The little gauge is air pressure for the front forks.


This is the air compressor for the air horns


Oil cooler and thermostat


Oil cooler Plumbing, there is an internal passage plugged to, so the oil goes to the cooler.


I rebuilt the front caliper today. I also cleaned , de-greased, wire brushed, primed, and painted glosss black. Pictures to follow later after the paint dries. .

What a mess.

I also put the center stand on, as it it easier to work on. Added air to the tires (oddly, they still hold air).

Gonna need lot of TLC.
 

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Re: '76 CB360t Restore

That's interesting, they cooled the oil before they filtered it, could stick a simple spin on filter housing in line with a cheap paper filter and save on oil.

Other than that, if the engine makes good compression leave it alone. Take it out, clean every thing, paint and what not, put it back and ride the crap out of it. Where are you located, most cooler mods end up way down south?

That's the first time I have seen a the 2 into 1 out the left side, unless something is wonky. :?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Re: '76 CB360t Restore

Compression, via kick start, is still good.

Early MAC exhaust. Had to fabricate a stop for the Kick Stand. It's why I took off the Center stand. Lost the center stand, so I just replaced it, but will need to fabricate a stop for it. It hits the pipe.

I was in NYC when I installed the oil cooler.

I hadn't thought of an external filter, but it might be a good Idea, as the centrifugal filter, in my opinion, is a little weak.

The problem with the external filter is only where to mount it....
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Re: '76 CB360t Restore

It's alive!

After an Oil change, I had to know if it would even run.

Hooked up a temporary battery, a service fuel tank...took a little time before it kicked over, but it ran!

Turned it off, tried a restart, instant run.....
Got my camera, took a vid....started again...right away!

It needs the valves adjusted, carbs synced, some adjustment, but it is firing on 2 cylinders, and starting easy.


I ran a a half gallon of gas through it, playing around with the carbs.....will let it cool and do a cold valve adjustment next, then I need to pull the carbs and double check the linkage.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Re: '76 CB360t Restore

Tonight, I put a Stainless Steel Speed Bleeder on the front brake caliper. I refilled the fluid and bled them.

The brakes are still a little soft, but will stop me faster than dragging my feet.

As I pull the brake lever, I can see the brake lines expanding, So the next round of money may go into stainless steel brake lines.

I put Galfer SS brake lines on my NH750, and it made a world of difference in feel and travel.

I am pretty confident all the air is out, so the lines are my primary suspect for a soft lever.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Re: '76 CB360t Restore

I've insured the Bike and will register it shortly. Last time it was registered by me was in 1987.

Also, I didn't know if I will need any pictures for the retitling (my title is in my name, but from NY, where I lived, need to title it in NJ) So I threw the old gas tank on and took a picture.

For you amusement:

 

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Discussion Starter #11
Re: '76 CB360t Restore

Picked up a cheapo battery today. $35. Should be good enough for now. Took out the battery box, wire brushed it and primed it. Will repaint it black when the primer is dry. Cleaned the rust off of the starter solenoid and inspected the wiring. I think I am going to have to replace the lead from the battery to to the solenoid. Feels too "soft" like it may break. I tossed out an old Computer UPS and it had some heavy battery leads that I saved for no apparent reason. I think one of them is just about the right gauge, and has the right ends. Will update as progress is made.

I also found a company nearby that does soda blasting. No idea of price, but will call them for an estimate soon. I would like to strip the frame and repaing, and having someone blast it clean will takes months off my progress. But I want to get it at least ride-able as is, for now. the strip and paint will be for the winter.

the Ancient Hawaiian disease symptoms are bothering me. Some of you my of experienced it too. It is called Lackamoney. I am about out of cash for now, and will take a little time to build up. I have some more parts just in. SS polished bolt set, some Tygon fuel line, and waiting for a SS carb screw set too. This way I replace the bolts as I take things apart and put them together.

I also polished the point cover case using my Dremel and some rubbing compound then the polishing compound. Took a while, but it is shiny now, though not mirror bright yet. However, it appears I may be able to do an adequate job on the engine cases. I also started checking out the Duplicolor HiTemp engine paint. When the mechanical parts are good, I am going to strip and paint the engine.

I am having trouble sleeping, just thinking about how cool the bike is going to be. I think I like it more now, then when I bought it in 1978, and I did like it then.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Re: '76 CB360t Restore

When the bike ran, I noticed the carbs were not synced well....I had thought I set them up pretty well, but my memory must of lied. I discoverd the idle adjustment cable/screw was completely un-threaded.

So I finished spraying the battery box black. Letting it dry.

I removed the carbs and checked them out. Installed the SS Screw kit too. The idle cable/screw required a bit of work to get working properly, not sure why, but it is right now. I put the carbs back together, and used a small drill bit to do a preliminary sync. Should be good enough for now.

Also in tonight from the mail was some nice, transparent yellow tygon fuel line and 2 small fuel filters. I prefer the paper type external filters.
The other item is the Insurance ID Cards. Will need to go to Motor Vehicles and get this registered and plated.
Carbs are back on, throttle cables adjusted and routed.

T damaged the pod filters putting them around the battery box. They pulled away from the element at the chrome end cap. For now, I am going to STV seal them, but later, i'll put some foam pods from UNI on. The are flexible and will bend around the battery box.


That's it for tonight. If I do some more work, I'll try to post a few more pictures.
 

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Re: '76 CB360t Restore

I enjoy the stainless on my carbs too, makes for getting the float bowls off pretty simple. I have always had issues with the JIS/Philips originals.
 

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Re: '76 CB360t Restore

Yes sir they are, I'm looking forward to this winter to pull the side covers off mine and strip the SH!*#&$^&@*&Y paint job I did and polish them up nice to match. One thing I can say, DON'T use BBQ paint if you can't bake it and even then it is NOT fuel resistant.

One thing I did do was trade out the screws for the point cover that came with the SS kit, I found some at my hardware store that were around 1/8" Allen instead of the Phillips they gave me.

Was gonna ask, on the oil cooler hook ups, where did you tap for the inlet? The crank case or the clutch cover?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Re: '76 CB360t Restore

thats the clutch cover, under the oil filter. It taps into the oil passages in the cover that feed the filter. I did it in 1979 0r 1980, and I don't have the details. I had to drill and tap the case. I was braver then.

I will have the cases off sometime in the future, I need to clean the filter for sure...I'll take some good shots and post them.

The hardware, except for the thermostat (which was optional, IIRC) is standard brass fittings, hose, and the cooler looks like a transmission cooler from a car. The shot needed most is the exact passage I needed to block. I can't remember exactly what I did 32 years ago for some reason....LOL

Except for winter starts, the cooler gets full low after warmup, as the oil is quite warm.
 

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Re: '76 CB360t Restore

The (An) oil cooler can be added anywhere in the passages leading to and from the filter AS LONG AS you can tap and install a plug in the original passage between the outlet (to the cooler) and the inlet (back from the cooler) .....I always preferred after because I think hot thin oil will separate its carried particulates more easily, but that's just my opinion (never tested to verify)....
A cold/pressure bypass/thermostat is always a good idea as well......
The pro's split the return line and send cool oil directly to the cam(s), and also return some to the main gallery to the other parts of the engine...If you do this, you have to also block the original stud passages at both ends, otherwise, some oil will "stay" trapped or move very slowly in/through them (due to some pressure coming from both sides), and get excessively hot, effectively negating the purpose of this modification.....
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Re: '76 CB360t Restore

66Sprint said:
The (An) oil cooler can be added anywhere in the passages leading to and from the filter AS LONG AS you can tap and install a plug in the original passage between the outlet (to the cooler) and the inlet (back from the cooler) .....I always preferred after because I think hot thin oil will separate its carried particulates more easily, but that's just my opinion (never tested to verify)....
A cold/pressure bypass/thermostat is always a good idea as well......
The pro's split the return line and send cool oil directly to the cam(s), and also return some to the main gallery to the other parts of the engine...If you do this, you have to also block the original stud passages at both ends, otherwise, some oil will "stay" trapped or move very slowly in/through them (due to some pressure coming from both sides), and get excessively hot, effectively negating the purpose of this modification.....
Yup, these are the pictures from my bike...done 32 years ago:

Oil cooler and thermostat


Oil cooler Plumbing, there is an internal passage plugged to, so the oil goes to the cooler.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Re: '76 CB360t Restore

Been busy on home repairs the last couple of days. I had to get a new set of feeler gauges. Couldn't find my old set. They will probably turn up now that I bought some new ones.

So next is a good valve adjustment, then Timing. Once the motor is prepped enough to run, I need to work on the wheels and spokes. I'd like to replace the wheels, but for now, I think I can replace the 2 broken spokes in the rear (Stripped threads) and just clean them enough to be ridable. When funding is increased, I'll replace them then.
 

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Re: '76 CB360t Restore

hello my good grammar Nazi. I was just thumbing through the threads and cam across this one. Your bike is very nice and i feel soon to be better! I noticed a lot of differences between my 75 and your 76, i was wondering if it was stock changes or your after market? on my handle bar mounts i have a chrome half moon on the top two bolt holes, your rear fender from the picture appears to be shorter and once more your header fasteners are of a different design just curiosity! trying for proper punctuation on my phone and i apologize if it is hard to read
:ugeek:
 
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