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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got the rear wheel off my 350G and am attempting to disassemble it. First up, the hub and, right this second, removing the sprocket. I've removed the four nuts which hold down the sprocket and removed the Giant Circlip and the Great Big Washer, however the sprocket does not want to move; or rather, it'll move a fraction of a millimeter rotationally and mayyyyybe as much as 1mm in the direction of the threaded ends ("up"? "off"? "in a pullward direction"?), but in both cases, the threaded ends all move with it. Is this just another case of 'soak things in various chemicals, heat them up, and hit them with hammers until they free up or you break something" ? If hammers, what should I (or should I not) be striking?
 

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The bolts that secure the sprocket are "PEGS" that sit in rubber bushings mounted in the rear hub.

The big washer & circlip is it what keeps them from pulling out.
The Studs prevent rotation and the rubber bushings sfoten the start up and shift transistions.

Just go ahead and pull them out no harm will be done.
The ends of the bolts are likely rusted to the sprocket.
It can be removed with all (4) studs attached, then soaked or heated to loosen the rust.

Do you have a MANUAL ?

If not go the the Manuals page of the Common Motor collective and download the 350 Factory service manual.

Also go the the CMNSL Site they have excellent Parts Fisch Diagrams you can look over to see the exploded view of how things go together.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Alas, the issue is that I can’t pull them out; the circlip and washer are out, but pulling up on the sprocket gets me nowhere; I can lift the entire wheel (tire and all) off the ground by the sprocket even tho the circlip isn’t there. FWIW, I’ve got copies of the manual and have explored the fiches at cmsnl for more hours than that is probably healthy. :)

As I understand it, the pegs slot into the wheel bushings, but the wheel bushings are a metal outer sleeve, a rubber middle section, and a metal inner sleeve. Is it possible the pegs have galvanically welded themselves to both the sprocket and the bushings?
 

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Here is mine taken apart. Without the circlip the sprocket just lifts out. Take pictures too, so its easier to see what you are looking at.
off.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I need to get better about posting pics when asking questions; force of years of habit of having to describe problems over the phone. =)


So, here's a pic of the bits I've taken off, just to level-set:

IMG_3627.jpg

...and here's the wheel as it sits:

IMG_3628.jpg

IMG_3629.jpg

IMG_3630.jpg


One things I did notice is that while I can lift the sprocket a fraction, I can only do that from one "side", where the hub has 4 sides, one at each threaded rod; I'll call them N/S/E/W for the sake of simplicity. If the sprocket lifts up maybe as much as 1mm from the South side, it lifts maybe half that on the adjacent (E/W) sides, and virtually none on the North side.
 

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Kroil or PB Blaster, liberally + heat from a heat gun + judicious tapping with a rubber mallet + patience = it'll come off.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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Perhaps a bit of wood on the far side and taping it around.
 

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Bingo; bit of heat + 1" dowl from the back through the spokes + a few not-terribly-hard shots with a deadblow and it's off. Thanks.
Glad you got it off, but seriously, go on Amazon, and order a can of Kroil, if you're going to work on old bikes. Trust me.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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PB Blaster &.or Kroil both are good for loosening up rusted parts.

Glad to hear you used a 1" dowel and easy hits. It is way to easy to get frustrated and start to hammer away and really cause damage.

Just an FYI but I suspect from the tone of your posts you know this.
"IF & WHEN" you need to whack on a bolt - thread a NUT on the it so you don't mushroom over the threads at the end.
You could have done that with the STUDS for the sprocket and it most likley would have broken the rust grip usually all it takes is some gentle shock.
 

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I'm not sure if it is just the pictures, but some of your studs look bent over. You may need to check them for straightness before you try to get a new sprocket on there.
 

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I'm not sure if it is just the pictures, but some of your studs look bent over. You may need to check them for straightness before you try to get a new sprocket on there.
the pictures are pretty good, aren't they? nice close-ups to look at, and I got the impression the holes in the sprocket had gotten slightly "squeezed" around the studs, kinda into the threads just a little, which could have explained why the sprocket was stubborn at first. Aren't those studs also accessible through the brake drum side of the hub so a drift can be used through the center of the bushings?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Just an FYI but I suspect from the tone of your posts you know this.
"IF & WHEN" you need to whack on a bolt - thread a NUT on the it so you don't mushroom over the threads at the end.
If you imagine a person who is woefully ignorant, I know less than that person; any and all advice welcome. Up until now, my motorcycle mechanical experience has been limited to oil changes (many), chain/sprocket, minor suspension work (replacing shocks, changing fork oil), and mild carb refreshes. I bought this bike as a way to start learning to work on bikes, so assume I know nothing about basically any topic under discussion.

You could have done that with the STUDS for the sprocket and it most likley would have broken the rust grip usually all it takes is some gentle shock.
Noted, and thanks. That’s the next item on the list, actually. Followed by bearing removal and (possibly. maybe. ) taking a shot at the cush drive. I’ve read enough stories about that on this forum to make me a bit leery of taking that on this early in my education, tho. Also, I don’t yet have a good drill. Or a barbeque grill. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Aren't those studs also accessible through the brake drum side of the hub so a drift can be used through the center of the bushings?
If I’m right, not really; the G shares those rubber covers on the back-side with the CB350F.

(Aside: I’m posting this directly from my phone, so I’ve no idea what that will do to the image)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm not sure if it is just the pictures, but some of your studs look bent over. You may need to check them for straightness before you try to get a new sprocket on there.
The photo is at least some of it; if they are bent, it’s not by nearly as much as the close-up + wide-angle lens distortion would lead one to believe. I’ll take some photos of the studs once I have them out.
 

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Sitz, the cush drives can be a big pain. I use a 1" hole saw, which fits perfectly to remove them. Preferably with a drill press, but I've also used a cordless drill, very carefully.

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